1. University of Virginia
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Undergraduate Course Descriptions - Spring 2018

English Surveys

ENGL 1500 - Masterworks of Literature

Section 001 - Sources of Shakespeare
MW 330-445 (Shannon House 107)
Instructor: John Parker

Hardly any of Shakespeare's plays originate with him.  He borrowed plotlines, characters, themes, and, often enough, verbatim wording from prior works in ways that, if you tried the same thing today, would probably constitute plagiarism.  We'll read his work alongside these sources with the hope of developing a deeper understanding of terms like influence, imitation, allusion, quotation, renaissance, revival, and theft.  We will have to ask what it means, if anything, to speak of Shakespeare's originality — was this, in fact, his primary talent or was his gift for remakes?  What does it mean that earlier periods had such different ideas about attribution and copyright? And where do the conspiracy theories around his authorship fit into all this?

At the same time we'll need to look at our sources for Shakespeare's plays: some of the most famous — Hamlet, King Lear, Othello — exist in multiple, equally authentic versions, though they differ from one another substantially.  How do editors decide between these competing sources when they produce contemporary editions?  How do you know which version you're reading in a modern textbook?

We'll use this double focus — on the sources Shakespeare adapted to write his plays and on the earliest printed sources for modern editions of Shakespeare — as a way to investigate larger questions about authorship, textual authority, and the meaning of authenticity.

ENGL 1550 - Literature and the Professions

Section 001 - Money Talks
MW 200-315 (Wilson Hall 325)
Instructor: Herbert Tucker

A reading-centered course for first- and second-year students who would never major in English but still want to give literature the old college try.  We’ll be tracing the literary fortunes of money in works concerned with the business of making it: how much money can mean, and how little; monetary vs. other values; the human costs and benefits of a business career; money and language as parallel systems of symbolic exchange.  Readings in drama from Shakespeare to David Mamet, and fiction from Dickens to Sinclair Lewis, with a poem here and there for good measure.  We’ll end with novels about advertising and corporations, having spent the middle of the term with a Victorian blockbuster about financial meltdown whose ominous title – The Way We Live Now – declares what, at the bottom line, this course will be all about.  A specially configured classroom will let us mingle professor’s lectures with small-group interaction and students’ oral presentations.  A short paper or two.  In lieu of a final exam, students will maintain a portfolio that tracks their reading and learning across the semester.

ENGL 2020 - History of European Literature II (4 Credits)

Lecture:
TR 1230-145 (Astronomy Building 265)
Instructor: Paul Cantor
Cross-listed with CPLT 2020.

This course surveys European literature from the seventeenth century to the twentieth.  Although it builds upon work in ENGL 2010, 2020 is a self-contained course and can certainly be taken by students who have not taken 2010.  As a course in literary history, it seeks to develop an understanding of period concepts, such as “Romantic” and “modern,” as well as concepts of genre, such as “the novel.” Among the topics to be discussed are the rise of the novel, the nature of the Enlightenment, the Romantic revolution in poetry, the new role of women in literature, responses to revolution and imperialism, nihilism and modern literature, and the issue of postmodernism.  Readings include (sometimes in the form of selections) Tartuffe, Robinson Crusoe, Candide, Faust, Persuasion, Wuthering Heights, Notes from Underground, and Waiting for Godot, as well as poetry by Blake, T. S. Eliot, and Rilke and short stories by Kafka. All foreign language works will be read in English translation.  Two lectures and one section meeting per week.  Requirements:  three papers and a final examination, as well as regular attendance and participation in discussion sections.  The course fulfills the Second Writing Requirement, and  can be used in lieu of an ENLT course as the pre-requisite for the English major; under the CPLT 2020 rubric, three hours of it can be counted toward the English major under the “literature in translation” option.

Discussion Sections:

Section 101
R 200-250 (Shannon House 107)
Instructor: Tom Berenato

Section 102
R 300-350 (Shannon House 107)
Instructor: Tom Berenato

ENGL 3030 - Global Cultural Studies

Lecture:
MW 100-150 (Wilson Hall 301)
Instructors: Michael Levenson

Global Humanities (Global Cultural Studies) offers an interdisciplinary approach to the varying conditions of world cultures during the decades just before and after the new millennium.  Through encounters with work in a wide variety of media (including film, popular song, avant-garde art, memoir, political philosophy), the course emphasizes the recent cultural histories of North Africa and Southern Europe, China, South Asia, and the Middle East.  Important regional events – such as the place of Gandhi in present-day Indian politics, the Chinese treatment of the artist Ai Wei Wei, the use of documentary film in the Arab spring – will be placed within a network of broad global exchange.  At every stage, we consider the making of contemporary culture within the important contexts that surround it: the campaign for international human rights, the independence movements in Africa and Asia, the resurgence of religious faith around the world, the power of the dominant economic model.  Throughout the semester, students will compose regular blogs on a regional topic that reflects their interests and convictions.

Discussion Sections:

Section 101
W 400-450 (New Cabell 338)
Instructor:

Section 102
W 500-550 (New Cabell 338)
Instructor:

Section 103
W 600-650 (New Cabell 338)
Instructor:

Section 104
R 400-450 (New Cabell 191)
Instructor:

Section 105
R 500-550 (New Cabell 191)
Instructor:

Section 106
R 600-650 (New Cabell 191)
Instructor:

Section 107
W 200-250 (Location TBA)
Instructor: TBA

Section 108
W 300-350 (Shannon House 108)
Instructor: TBA

Section 109
W 500-550 (New Cabell 058)
Instructor: TBA

Section 110
R 600-650 (Bryan Hall 332)
Instructor: TBA

ENGL 3820 - History of Literatures in English II

Lecture:
MW 1100-1150 (Wilson Hall 402)
Instructors: Stephen Cushman & Michael Levenson

The history of literature from Romanticism to the present. The course is a study in landmark literary events, including the poetic revolution at the beginning of the nineteenth century, the ascendancy of the novel in the Victorian age, the audacious experiments of Modernism and Postmodernism, and the complex conditions of literature today. The course is also an encounter with radiant individual texts by authors such as Keats, Blake, Dickinson, Woolf, Faulkner, Hurston, Plath and Roy. We approach these works as indispensable elements of cultural memory, keenly aware of our own position within a global and digital age.  English majors, possible English majors, and non-English majors all warmly welcome.

Discussion Sections:

Section 101
R 1100-1215 (Dawson's Row 1)

Section 102
W 200-315 (Dawson's Row 1)

Section 103
W 200-315 (Location TBA)

Section 104
R 1100-1215 (Bryan 233)

Section 105
R 1230-145 (New Cabell 036)

Section 106
W 500-615 (New Cabell 315)

Section 107
R 200-315 (Location TBA)

Section 108
W 330-445 (Location TBA)

Section 109
W 330-445 (Dawson's Row 1)

Section 110
R 930-1045 (Dawson's Row 1)

Section 111
R 330-445 (New Cabell 183)

Section 112
W 630-745 (Bryan Hall 310)

Section 113
R 500-615 (Wilson 238)

Section 114
F 830-945 AM (Shannon House 108)

Section 115
W 500-615 (New Cabell 407)

Section 116
R 200-315 (Dawson's Row 1)

Section 117
R 1230-145 (Dawson's Row 1)

 

Introductory Seminars in Literature

ENLT 2100 - Introduction to Literary Studies

Section 001 - Will and Jane in the World
TR 200-315 (New Cabell 415)
Instructor: Claire Eager

As we explore literary reading and writing across genres and time periods, our guides will be not only those two outsized figures of literary celebrity, William Shakespeare and Jane Austen, but also their global contexts, then and now.  Focusing on a few plays and novels, along with some lyric poetry of the Renaissance and Romantic periods, we’ll ask:  How do global events such as war and colonization appear (or disappear) in these works?  How have later writers, artists, and filmmakers engaged Shakespeare and Austen on issues of gender, class, and race?

Section 002 - Introduction to Literary Study
TR 1100-1215 (Cocke Hall 115)
Instructor: Herbert Tucker

This course for prospective English majors aims to impart and hone the skills they will need as they advance through the departmental curriculum.  The syllabus varies from year to year, but analysis of literary genres in verse, prose fiction, and drama will be faithfully highlighted.  As we practice reading, we'll also get lots of practice writing that peculiar genre the critical essay, a form with demands and pleasures of its own.  We'll look closely, read deeply, think widely, speak boldly, and write clearly in overnight exercises, shorter and longer essays, midterm and final exams and, above all, the focussed and collaborative discussion that fills our twice-weekly meetings.  A group visit or two to local theaters will be likely.  A new digital resource, “For Better for Verse,” will help to improve acquaintance with the metrics of verse.   (Casual registrants are discouraged from picking this course solely in order to satisfy the Second Writing Requirement: there are many easier options out there.)

ENLT 2511 - Masterpieces of English Literature

Section 001
MW 330-445 (New Cabell 068)
Instructor: Samuel Lemley

ENLT 2514 - Modern American Authors

Section 001 - American Modernisms 
TR 800-915 (New Cabell 064)
Instructor: Megan Haury

Our course “American Modernisms” will serve as both an introduction to major concerns of American studies and also a survey of American literature produced during the modernist period, to include novels, short stories, and poetry. “Modernism” is often figured primarily as an international or global movement; what does it mean, then, to consider “modernism” in the nationalistic context of American literature? What is illuminated about modernism, and what about the meaning of “America” in the literature of the period? We will consider formal and thematic innovations in American modernist texts as they sought an art to equal and express a fragmented, de-centered modern experience. We will also take into account the transnational foundation many of these texts build upon to explore “America” as a space and an idea. Examining a plurality of “modernisms” in our course, we will think through multiple sites of intervention in modernist art and think through different contexts for the creation and dissemination of that art by a variety of authors. In the process, we will study issues of immigration, race, ethnic identity, gender, language, and national identity with respect to this construction of American modernist literature. Likely authors for the course will be Ernest Hemingway, Nella Larsen, William Faulkner, Willa Cather, Zora Neale Hurston, Jean Toomer, Claude McKay, Wallace Stevens, F. Scott Fitzgerald, William Carlos Williams, and Marianne Moore, among others.

ENLT 2523 - Studies in Poetry

Section 001
TR 1230-145 (Maury Hall 113)
Instructor: Adam Friedgen

Section 002 - What is a Poem?
MW 330-445 (New Cabell 407)
Instructor: Peter Miller

What is a poem? Is it a series of rhyming and rhythmic words? Or the alphabet and ink used to store those words? What about metaphor, simile, personification, and other “poetic” devices? In this class we’ll get down to brass tacks on the oldest of literary genres, paying particular attention to how linguistic definitions of poetry can never quite escape matters of air, paper, vinyl, and other mediating substances.

While focusing mainly on poems from the last century, this course will dance selectively through the entire history of English language poetry, from Geoffrey Chaucer’s fourteenth-century Canterbury Tales to a contemporary rap-influenced remix of these tales by the Black British poet Patience Agbabi. In between, we’ll ask why John Milton shunned “jingling” rhymes in Paradise Lost, and why Edgar Allan Poe brought them back with a vengeance. Why William Blake believed illuminated manuscripts could cleanse “the doors of perception,” and why Emily Dickinson kept her manuscripts mostly indoors. These and other questions await in a course that will include two papers (5-7 pages each) and two exams, but which will be mostly devoted to talking together about what makes poems tick. No advanced knowledge of poetry is required to enjoy and do well in this course.

ENLT 2524 - Studies in Drama

Section 001 - Women in Drama
MWF 1100-1150 (Bryan Hall 332)
Instructor: Adriana Streifer

In this age of Netflix, what do plays mean to us, and what is their role in our cultural landscape? In what ways would our answers be similar to or differ from the responses of theater audiences in other eras? Reading plays and watching theater from other eras requires us to step outside of ourselves and engage in some imaginative time travel and cultural anthropology.

In this course, we’ll embark on a time-travelling adventure by reading and watching key plays written by women, or featuring significant female characters. We will focus our attention on representations of and by women because doing so allows us to respond to some of the major thematic questions theater poses, such as:  What are proper roles for women in the public sphere, including on stage (and what does “proper” mean, and to whom)? Is identity a performance, or is it authentic? Can we even distinguish performance from authenticity? How do we define honor, and who gets to have it? What responsibilities do individuals have to their communities, and vice versa? How are economic systems, racism, and misogyny interrelated? When addressing these questions, we’ll also ask ourselves how the answers have changed over 2000 years, and how they have stayed the same.

The course requirements include attending a performance of Caryl Churchill’s Top Girls, and discussion with the actors and director, at Live Arts on Wednesday evening, February 14th. Check your availability on that date before enrolling in the course.

ENLT 2526 - Studies in Fiction

Section 001 - Novels to Live By
TR 930-1045 (New Cabell 411)
Instructor: Karen Chase Levenson

The premise of this course is that part of the pleasure we look for when reading lies in thinking about some of the more profound questions about life: where do I find purpose; what are worthy ambitions; how does one find or follow a vocation; what is the relation between truth and belief; what is a meaningful life; what is an ethical life? We will read three great (and lengthy) novels, each of which poses and struggles with these (and similar) questions. There is no didactic intent here: the spirit is philosophical investigation and the method is literary analysis. The novels are:  Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina, Dostoevsky’s The Brothers Karamazov, and Eliot’s Middlemarch.

You will write weekly responses in addition to one short and one long essay. There will also be reading quizzes and a final exam.

Section 002 - The Devil in English Literature
MW 200-315 (Bryan Hall 332)
Instructor: Britta Rowe

Section 003 - Statecraft: The Art of Propaganda
TR 330-445 (Bryan Hall 330)
Instructor: Sherif Abdelkarim

ENLT 2530 - Studies in Global Literature

Section 001 - Beach Reads, Littorally
TR 1230-145 (New Cabell 407)
Instructor: Alsion Glassie

New World colonialism had to step ashore. Thus, our investigation of the literature and culture of Hemispheric beaches and coasts begins in the early modern period, arcing toward a substantive unit on the literary, cultural, and political responses to sea level rise and other coastal impacts of climate change. We’ll also critically examine the politics and assumptions of the “beach reads” category. Expect readings from various literary genres and periods, with secondary readings from social science, marine science, and environmental policy.

ENLT 2547 - Black Writers in America

Section 001
T 330-600 (Cocke Hall 101)
Instructor: Jeffery Allen

Section 002 - Race, Crime, and Justice in African American Literature
TR 1230-145 (Cocke Hall 101)
Instructor: Sarah Ingle

This course will explore the history of race, crime, and justice in African American literature and culture from Nat Turner's 1831 slave rebellion to today's Black Lives Matter movement. What is justice? How does the history of racial oppression in America complicate traditional ideas about the relationship between law and justice? How do African American writers both use and defy the genre conventions of traditional American detective fiction and courtroom dramas? In an attempt to answer these questions, we will spend the semester discussing portrayals of race-related crimes, criminal investigations, and legal proceedings in literature, film, and music from the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries. Our syllabus will include texts by Charles Chesnutt, Pauline Hopkins, Langston Hughes, Rudolph Fisher, Nella Larsen, Chester Himes, Richard Wright, Ann Petry, Martin Luther King, Jr., Gwendolyn Brooks, Toni Morrison, and Walter Mosley. We will also discuss music by Billie Holiday and Nina Simone and movies by Anna Deavere Smith and Spike Lee. This course fulfills the second writing requirement.

ENLT 2550 - Shakespeare

Section 001 - Shakespeare and Company: Language, Spectacle, and Violence
TR 200-315 (New Cabell Hall 411)
Instructor: Gretchen York

At the beginning of Shakespeare’s Hamlet, the murdered king’s ghost wanders the parapets of Elsinore, and his cries for retribution still thrill audiences today. But Shakespeare’s ghost is only partly Shakespeare’s invention: revenge tragedies, which piled bodies high onto the Renaissance stage both before and after Hamlet, were fueled by spirits who demanded that their wrongs be righted through violence. This course, keeping King Hamlet in mind, will introduce students to the study of Shakespeare by putting his plays in conversation with those of the period’s other major dramatists. How does Shakespeare transform theatrical conventions that appear first in the plays of Thomas Kyd or Christopher Marlowe? What do later playwrights like John Webster learn from his works? And why did Shakespeare emerge from this community of authors to become the touchstone for the study of English drama? To investigate these questions, we will survey several genres of drama, attending to the relationship between theatrical spectacle and linguistic virtuosity in plays like Hamlet, The Merchant of Venice, Richard II, and The Tempest.

Section 002 - Introduction to Shakespeare
TR 930-1045 (Bryan Hall 330)
Instructor: Matthew Davis

This course will provide an introduction to Shakespeare for students with little or no previous exposure to the Bard. It is intended especially for students who suffer from that dread disease Shakes-fear.  We will begin by reading Gary Blackwood’s Shakespeare Stealer, a work of historical fiction, written for young readers, which provides a very accessible and surprisingly accurate introduction to Elizabethan London and the world of Shakespeare’s acting company. After this introduction, we will read seven or eight Shakespeare plays – probably three or four of the great tragedies (Hamlet; King Lear; Macbeth; Othello) and four history plays, which comprise a “tetralogy” or series of four linked plays (Richard II; Henry IV, Part I; Henry IV, Part II; Henry V). During the course of the semester, we will watch the critically acclaimed “Hollow Crown” TV series, which includes productions of the four history plays, and go to see Hamlet and/or Richard II performed live at the American Shakespeare Center in Staunton. This means that, in addition to (moderate) textbook expenses, students should be prepared to pay for theater tickets and (if necessary) chartered bus transportation to and from Staunton – additional costs may range from $40 at the low end to $220 at the high end.

ENLT 2552 - Women in Literature

Section 001 - Contemporary Women's Texts
TR 200-315 (Cocke Hall 101)
Instructor: Susan Fraiman

An introduction to close reading and critical writing focused on recent works by women in a variety of genres and from a range of national contexts.  Possible works (final list still to be determined) include stories by Nigerian writer Chimamanda Adichie; a graphic narrative of growing up by U.S. cartoonist Alison Bechdel; a film directed by Lebanese-American Rola Nashef; images by queer, South African photographer Zanele Muholi; Moroccan feminist Fatima Mernissi’s memoir of a “harem girlhood.”  Our discussion of these texts will address basic formal issues: modes of narration; the difference between “story” and “plot”; the use of framing and other structural devices; the constraints of genre; the handling of images, tone, and diction.  Likely thematic concerns include the effects of colonialism and migration on women; explorations by women of growing up, growing old, marriage, maternity, queer sexuality, work, and creativity; ties and tensions among women across boundaries of nation, generation, race, and class; the divergent meanings of feminism for women around the world.  We will work not only on becoming attentive readers but also on learning to conceive and organize effective critical essays.  This writing intensive course (three papers totaling 20 pages) satisfies the prerequisite for the English major as well as the second-writing requirement.   There is also a final exam.

Section 002 - Feminism and Fiction
TR 330-445 (Bryan Hall 334)
Instructor: Annie Galvin

Perceiving gender always involves an act of interpretation: we read bodies, gestures, relationships, personal and public histories every day. This course will examine how gender presents itself in literary forms, specifically in novels (alongside the occasional essay). Reading across centuries and genres, from social realism to sci fi to YA, we will grapple with the concept of feminism, an orientation and political movement that changes with context, and how women-identified writers portray gender and relationships in their work. The syllabus may include work by Jane Austen, Virginia Woolf, Maxine Hong Kingston, Angela Carter, Zora Neale Hurston, Gabby Rivera, Octavia Butler, and Kathy Acker.

ENLT 2555 - Special Topics

Section 001 - Courtship and Its Discontents
TR 11:00-12:15 (New Cabell Hall 489)
Instructor: Rebecca Rush

“What tale would you like best to hear?”

“Oh, I have not much choice! They generally run on the same theme—courtship; and promise to end in the same catastrophe—marriage.”

—Charlotte Bronte, Jane Eyre

Why do so many of our tales, from Renaissance sonnets to modern rom-coms, recount the thrills and woes of wooing? And why do they so often come to an abrupt halt with what Jane Eyre calls the “catastrophe” of marriage? In this course, we will deliberate about what draws novelists, poets, and playwrights to the theme of courtship. And we will anatomize the many different ways in which they bemoan, scrutinize, and relish the twists, turns, detours, and pot-holes in the road to love. Authors include John Donne, William Shakespeare, Jane Austen, Oscar Wilde, Henry James, and Carol Ann Duffy.

Section 002 - Queer Texts and Theory
TR 930-1045 (Bryan Hall 334)
Instructor: Rebecca Levy

This course will be an introductory exploration of a handful of key queer texts from the last century.  We will progress chronologically, and through these texts, students will witness the development of queer thought and identity, from the beginning of the 20th century to the present.  The texts we read will provide insight into shifting historical attitudes, modes, and questions pertinent to queer literature.  In addition to gaining a nuanced understanding of these works as individual texts, we will attempt to answer the question of whether queer literature can be classified as a coherent, separate genre.  What would be the benefits of doing so?  We will discuss and analyze literary texts, historical documents, and theoretical frameworks.  Students will have a chance to engage with questions of censorship, of representation, of the intersection of identities, and of the relationship between activism and scholarly work.

Section 004 - Advanced Introduction to Poetry
TR 330-445 (Bryan Hall 312)
Instructor: Walter Jost

“If you don’t enjoy reading, there goes literature.” --Gore Vidal

In his book Melodious Guile, poet-scholar John Hollander writes: “Classical rhetoric became in the Renaissance a metaphor for what it had originally been, a theory of poetry instead of a manual for oratorical power.  In poetic rhetoric, we are convinced by tropes of logos, pathos, and ethos—[that is] of meaning, feeling, and authority . . . to grant rightness to a fiction or interpretation, to confer on it . . . the truth of . . . belief.”  Reading literature as a mode of symbolic action attunes us both to its calculated designs on us and to our own needs for practical resources to lead our lives. This course studies the subtle ways that “rhetoric-as-persuasion” operates in poetry to shape our beliefs and attitudes towards the world outside the classroom.  It is designed for those with a strong motivation to read poetry and write well about it.  We will read a wide variety of British and American poetry from Shakespeare to Ashbery.   2 papers and a final.

Section 005 - Fantasy and Science Fiction
TR 1230-145 (Bryan 233)
Instructor: Karen Huang

In this course, students would read and view fantasy and sci-fi narratives, both American and global. These narratives would encompass a range of print and audiovisual media, including but not necessarily limited to short stories, novels, graphic novels, films, TV series, and digital media. Students will be encouraged to consider what the possible worlds depicted in works of fantasy and sci-fi do, and how they critique and/or illuminate the structures and politics of our world. In reading or viewing some works in translation, students will also be prompted to investigate the translatability and transmutability of non-Anglophone/non-Western narratives of fantasy and sci-fi.

Academic and Professional Writing

ENWR 1505 - Writing and Critical Inquiry: Stretch I

Section Locations Variable
Fall Semesters

Offers a two-semester approach to the First Writing Requirement. This sequence allows students to take more time, in smaller sections and with support from the Writing Center, practicing and reinforcing the activities that are central to the first-year writing course. Like ENWR 1510, ENWR 1505-06 approaches writing as a way of generating, representing, and reflecting on critical inquiry. Students contribute to an academic conversation about a specific subject of inquiry and learn to position their ideas and research in relation to the ideas and research of others.  Instructors place student writing at the center of course, encourage students to think on the page, and prepare them to reflect on contemporary forms of expression.  Students read and respond to each other’s writing in class regularly, and they engage in thoughtful reflection on their own rhetorical choices as well as those of peers and published writers.  Additionally, the course requires students to give an oral presentation on their research and to assemble a digital portfolio of their writing.

ENWR 1506 - Writing and Critical Inquiry: Stretch II

Section Locations Variable
Spring Semesters

Offers a two-semester approach to the First Writing Requirement. This sequence allows students to take more time, in smaller sections and with support from the Writing Center, practicing and reinforcing the activities that are central to the first-year writing course. Like ENWR 1510, ENWR 1505-06 approaches writing as a way of generating, representing, and reflecting on critical inquiry. Students contribute to an academic conversation about a specific subject of inquiry and learn to position their ideas and research in relation to the ideas and research of others.  Instructors place student writing at the center of course, encourage students to think on the page, and prepare them to reflect on contemporary forms of expression.  Students read and respond to each other’s writing in class regularly, and they engage in thoughtful reflection on their own rhetorical choices as well as those of peers and published writers.  Additionally, the course requires students to give an oral presentation on their research and to assemble a digital portfolio of their writing.

ENWR 1507 - Writing and Critical Inquiry: Stretch I for Multilingual Writers

Two-semester course (1508 to be taken in spring)

Section Locations Variable
Fall Semesters

Offers instruction in academic writing, critical inquiry, and the conventions of American English for non-native speakers of English. Space is limited, and priority is given to students who are required to take the sequence by recommendation of the admissions office, the transition program, or the writing program.

ENWR 1508 - Writing and Critical Inquiry: Stretch II for Multilingual Writers

Section Locations Variable
Spring Semesters

Offers instruction in academic writing, critical inquiry, and the conventions of American English for non-native speakers of English. Space is limited, and priority is given to students who are required to take the sequence by recommendation of the admissions office, the transition program, or the writing program.

ENWR 1510 - Writing and Critical Inquiry

Section Locations Variable
Fall and Spring Semesters

Approaches writing as a way of generating, representing, and reflecting on critical inquiry. Students contribute to an academic conversation about a specific subject of inquiry and learn to position their ideas and research in relation to the ideas and research of others.  Instructors place student writing at the center of course, encourage students to think on the page, and prepare them to reflect on contemporary forms of expression.  Students read and respond to each other’s writing in class regularly, and they engage in thoughtful reflection on their own rhetorical choices as well as those of peers and published writers.  Additionally, the course requires students to give an oral presentation on their research and to assemble a digital portfolio of their writing.

ENWR 1559 - Writing for Life

Lecture:
T 200-315 (Ruffner Hall 177)
Instructor: James Seitz

Discussion Sections:

Section 101:
R 330-445

Section 102:
R 200-315

Section 103:
W 3:30-4:45

ENWR 2510 - Advanced Writing Seminar

Section 001 - Writing about Culture/Society
TR 1100-1215 (Dell 1 104)
Instructor: Kate Stephenson

Section 003 - Writing about Science & Technology
MW 330-445 (New Cabell 389)
Instructor: Corey Shaman

Section 004 - Writing as Mindful Practice
TR 330-445 (New Cabell 315)
Instructor: Devin Donovan

Everywhere we look, from course catalogs, to hospitals, to corporate boardrooms, mindfulness practice is being offered as an essential antidote to stress, distraction, and burnout.

In this course, we’ll investigate the history and current popularity of mindfulness to develop our own understanding of its usefulness. Throughout the course we will put acts of mindfulness in conversation with acts of writing to see what that combination might produce. Using writing as a form of discovery, we’ll explore how mindfulness might make us better writers, and how writing might make us more mindful human beings.

Note: This class will ask you to participate in some light physical activity, including breathing exercises, light yoga, and experimental composition.

Section 005 - Writing about Culture/Society
MW 330-445 (New Cabell 489)
Instructor: Lindgren Johnson

Section 006 - Documenting Difference
TR 330-445 (New Cabell 407)
Instructor: Sarah O'Brien

ENWR 2520 - Special Topics in Writing

Section 001 - Writing as Technology
MWF 1100-1150 (Bryan 203)
Instructor: Patricia Sullivan

Section 002 - Public Speaking
MWF 900-950 (Bryan 334)
Instructor: Megan Haury

Our class approaches the topic of public speaking as a critical inquiry we will undertake together, exploring the nature of “public speaking” itself while asking questions about what makes a “good” public speaker and what makes memorable public speech. Throughout the semester we will interrogate speeches and public speaking in order to develop significant lines of inquiry on speech, allowing us to better understand the varieties of speech we might engage in at UVA and beyond. While some of us may have occasion for sustained traditional speeches, we will all engage in a variety of other types of speech in professional and academic life, in discussions, presentations, meetings, and interviews; we will also engage in public speaking in a variety of community settings, and ceremonial events as well. To narrow our inquiry, we will specifically focus on American political rhetoric this semester, reading a variety of well-known American speeches that range from the birth of the nation through the present day. This will allow us to consider specific norms of political speech and political performance as we also consider a range of related issues and questions about voice, audience, purpose, methods, and language, among other things. To that end, we will also incorporate analysis of films, a novel, and other fictional texts as well as theoretical essays on speech and language to help us form a strong basis for our questions about speech. The exploration of speech as performance itself will undergird our class conversation this semester and will allow us to develop a rich set of questions and issues to illuminate speech of all types.

Section 004 - Writing as Technology
MWF 1000-1050 (Bryan 203)
Instructor: Patricia Sullivan

Section 006 - Project-Based Writing
TR 1230-145 (New Cabell 309)
Instructor: Kate Kostelnik

Section 008 - Public Speaking
MWF 800-850 (New Cabell 291)
Instructor: Megan Haury

Our class approaches the topic of public speaking as a critical inquiry we will undertake together, exploring the nature of “public speaking” itself while asking questions about what makes a “good” public speaker and what makes memorable public speech. Throughout the semester we will interrogate speeches and public speaking in order to develop significant lines of inquiry on speech, allowing us to better understand the varieties of speech we might engage in at UVA and beyond. While some of us may have occasion for sustained traditional speeches, we will all engage in a variety of other types of speech in professional and academic life, in discussions, presentations, meetings, and interviews; we will also engage in public speaking in a variety of community settings, and ceremonial events as well. To narrow our inquiry, we will specifically focus on American political rhetoric this semester, reading a variety of well-known American speeches that range from the birth of the nation through the present day. This will allow us to consider specific norms of political speech and political performance as we also consider a range of related issues and questions about voice, audience, purpose, methods, and language, among other things. To that end, we will also incorporate analysis of films, a novel, and other fictional texts as well as theoretical essays on speech and language to help us form a strong basis for our questions about speech. The exploration of speech as performance itself will undergird our class conversation this semester and will allow us to develop a rich set of questions and issues to illuminate speech of all types.

ENWR 2700 - News Writing

Section 001
TR 800-915 (Bryan 203)
Instructor: Brian Kelly

Development of basic writing skills, with craftsmanship the emphasis. Study, discussion and rewrite of old and new media stories. Workshop setting. Readings from texts and various other sources. Progress from short hard-news pieces through speech stories, legislative and political coverage, to use of narrative and on to features in general. Repeated writing drills. Essential to follow current events as well. Satisfies second writing requirement.

Section 002
TR 930-1045 (Bryan 203)
Instructor: Brian Kelly

Development of basic writing skills, with craftsmanship the emphasis. Study, discussion and rewrite of old and new media stories. Workshop setting. Readings from texts and various other sources. Progress from short hard-news pieces through speech stories, legislative and political coverage, to use of narrative and on to features in general. Repeated writing drills. Essential to follow current events as well. Satisfies second writing requirement.

ENWR 3900 - Career-Based Writing and Rhetoric

Develops proficiency in a range of stylistic and persuasive effects. The course is designed for students who want to hone their writing skills, as well as for students preparing for careers in which they will write documents for public circulation. Students explore recent research in writing studies. In the workshop-based studio sessions, students propose, write, and edit projects of their own design. (Meets second writing requirement.) 

Section 001
MW 200-315 (Ruffner Hall 125)
Instructor: John Casteen

Section 002
MWF 1000-1050 (Shannon House 108)
Instructor: Jon D'Errico

Creative Writing

ENCW 2300 - Poetry Writing

An introductory course in poetry writing, with a primary focus on creating new poems in a workshop setting. Students will study basic poetic terms and techniques and revise and arrange a series of poems for a final portfolio. The course will also have extensive outside reading and non-creative writing requirements.  While first- and second-years are the primary audience for ENCW 2300 and should register for the course using SIS, third- and fourth-year students can request to be added manually. For the add procedure (as well as other creative writing policies) see this page.

Section 001
MW 500-615 (Bryan 328)
Instructor: TBA

Section 002
TR 1100-1215 (New Cabell 042)
Instructor: TBA

Section 003
TR 500-615 (The Rotunda 152)
Instructor: TBA

Section 004
MWF 1000-1050 (Bryan 312)
Instructor: TBA

Section 005
TR 500-615 (New Cabell 287)
Instructor: TBA

ENCW 2530 - Introduction to Poetry Writing - Themed

Section 001
TR 500-615 (Bryan 328)
Instructor: TBA

Section 002
MW 500-615 (Bryan 334)
Instructor: TBA

ENCW 2560 - Introduction to Fiction Writing - Themed

Section 001
TR 500-615 (Bryan 235)
Instructor: TBA

Section 002
MW 500-615 (Bryan 334)
Instructor: TBA

ENCW 2600 - Fiction Writing

An introductory course in fiction writing, with a primary focus on creating short stories in a workshop setting. Students will study basic narrative terms and techniques and revise several short stories for a final portfolio. The course will also have extensive outside reading and non-creative writing requirements. While first- and second-years are the primary audience for ENCW 2600 and should register for the course using SIS, third- and fourth-year students can request to be added manually.

For the add procedure (as well as other creative writing policies) see this page.

Section 001
TR 1100-1215 (The Rotunda Room 150)
Instructor: TBA

Section 002
MW 600-715 (Bryan 312)
Instructor: TBA

Section 003
TR 500-615 (Bryan 310)
Instructor: TBA

Section 004
TR 930-1045 (New Cabell 042)
Instructor: TBA

Section 005
MWF 900-950 (Bryan 310)
Instructor: TBA

Section 006
MWF 100-150 (Bryan 330)
Instructor: TBA

ENCW 3310 - Intermediate Poetry Writing I

Section 001
W 200-430 (Bryan 330)
Instructor: Paul Guest

A weekly 2.5-hour class for students advanced beyond the level of ENCW 2300. Emphasis is on workshop of students' own poems, with focused writing exercises and written responses to relevant outside reading, as well as class discussions on issues of contemporary poetry.

Instructor Permission Required, contact Prof. Paul Guest at pmg4w@virginia.edu for application details.

Section 002
T 1000-1230 (Dawson's Row 1)
Instructor: Debra Nystrom

Restricted to Instructor Permission

A weekly 2.5-hour class for students advanced beyond the level of ENCW 2300. Emphasis is on workshop of students' own poems, with focused writing exercises and written responses to relevant outside reading, as well as class discussions on issues of contemporary poetry.  Final poetry portfolio required.

Admission is by Permission of Instructor Only.  APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS:  Sample of student work (4-5 poems) to be submitted IN A SINGLE DOCUMENT (either electronically in MS Word, or a hard paper copy) --by three weeks before the beginning of classes next semester-- to Professor Nystrom’s email address at dln8u@virginia.edu or to her English Dept. faculty mailbox in Bryan Hall’s faculty lounge; submissions should include a cover sheet with name, year, email address, telephone number, major, prior workshop experience, and other workshops to which you are submitting.   Every effort will be made to notify students of acceptance during the week prior to the beginning of classes, so that students may finalize their schedules in SIS.

Section 003
T 230-500 (Bryan Hall 233)
Instructor: Rita Dove

RESTRICTED TO:  INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION

COURSE DESCRIPTION:  A weekly 2.5-hour class for students advanced beyond the level of ENWR 2300. Emphasis is on workshop of students' own poems, with focused writing exercises and written responses to relevant outside reading, as well as class discussions on issues of contemporary poetry. Final poetry portfolio required. ADMISSION BY PERMISSION OF INSTRUCTOR ONLY.

DETAILED APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS:  Sample of student work (6-8 poems) to be submitted IN A SINGLE DOCUMENT (electronically in MS Word, and/or a paper hard copy) NO LATER THAN 12:00 PM Noon on Friday, December 15, 2017, to Professor Dove's email address at rfd4b@virginia.edu or to her English Dept faculty mailbox in 229 Bryan Hall; EACH SUBMISSION MUST INCLUDE a cover sheet with name, year, email address, telephone number, major, prior workshop experience, and other workshops to which you are submitting. ALSO, COVER SHEET AND ALL POEMS MUST BE SUBMITTED IN A SINGLE MS WORD DOCUMENT.

NOTIFICATION:  Every effort will be made to notify students one week prior to the beginning of classes in January, so students may finalize their schedules in SIS

ENCW 3610 - Intermediate Fiction Writing

Section 001
T 400-630 (Dawson's Row 1)
Instructor: Elizabeth Denton

Instructor Permission Required.

Read short fiction.  Write your own.  Students will write two stories and revise one. Creative responses to weekly reading assignments encourage students to focus on the most fundamental building block of the short story:  scene making.   Active classroom participation and love of reading and writing are essential.

To be considered for this class, please send a short story (up to 15 pages) to me at ed3m@virginia.edu by Friday, December 1st.  Attach a note telling me who and what year you are, your email address, what workshops you’ve taken and with whom, and whether you’re applying to other workshops. I will alert you through SIS as soon as possible.  INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION means you must submit work to be considered—see above.

Section 002
R 400-630 (Dawson's Row 1)
Instructor: Elizabeth Denton

Instructor Permission Required.

Read short fiction.  Write your own.  Students will write two stories and revise one. Creative responses to weekly reading assignments encourage students to focus on the most fundamental building block of the short story:  scene making.   Active classroom participation and love of reading and writing are essential.

To be considered for this class, please send a short story (up to 15 pages) to me at ed3m@virginia.edu by Friday, December 1st.  Attach a note telling me who and what year you are, your email address, what workshops you’ve taken and with whom, and whether you’re applying to other workshops. I will alert you through SIS as soon as possible.  INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION means you must submit work to be considered—see above.

Section 003
M 1100-130 (Bryan 233)
Instructor: Thomas Pierce

Instructor Permission Required.

ENCW 4350 - Advanced Nonfiction Writing

W 230-500 (Bryan 233)
Instructor: Thomas Pierce

For advanced students with experience in writing literary nonfiction. Involves workshop of student work, craft discussion, and relevant reading. May be repeated with a different instructor.

ENCW 4810 - Advanced Fiction Writing I

W 400-630 (New Cabell 064)
Instructor: Jeffery Allen

Instructor Permission Required.

ENCW 4830 - Advanced Poetry Writing I

M 200-430 (New Cabell 415)
Instructor: Gregory Orr

Instructor Permission Required.

We will meet once a week for a two and a half hour workshop which will focus on student production and revision of poems, craft topics, and exemplary poems which can help us become more aware of strategies and qualities of successful poems. Students will be writing poems on a regular basis in response to assignments and will be generating poems of their own according to their interests in particular styles or themes.

Class Limit: 12.
Admission by Instructor Permission Only. Interested students should submit 6 sample poems, their year, and poetry writing background in a SINGLE WORD DOCUMENT ATTACHMENT.
DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION: DECEMBER 1. Early submissions encouraged as I will begin filling the class before the deadline with qualified applicants.

ENCW 5310 - Advanced Poetry Writing II

R 200-430 (Bryan 233)
Instructor: Debra Nystrom

Restricted to Instructor Permission.

This workshop is for students with a good deal of prior experience in writing and revising poetry. The class will involve discussion of student poems and of assigned reading, with particular attention to issues of craft.  Students will be expected to write and revise six to eight poems, to participate in class discussion and offer detailed notes in response to other students’ work, to keep a work journal, to attend several poetry readings, to turn in close-reading responses to three assigned readings, to write one longer paper and participate in a group presentation. 

Instructor Permission is required for registration.  APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS:  Sample of student work (4-5 poems) to be submitted IN A SINGLE DOCUMENT (either electronically in Word, or a hard paper copy) --by three weeks before the beginning of classes next semester-- to Professor Nystrom’s email address at dln8u@virginia.edu or to her English Dept. faculty mailbox in Bryan Hall’s faculty lounge; submissions should include a cover sheet with name, year, email address, telephone number, major, prior workshop experience, and other workshops to which you are submitting.   Every effort will be made to notify students of acceptance during the week prior to the beginning of classes, so that students may finalize their schedules in SIS.

ENCW 5610 - Advanced Fiction Writing II

R 700-930 (Bryan 310)
Instructor: John Casey

Instructor Permission Required.

Poetry Writing Program

ENPW 4820 - Poetry Program Poetics

Section 001
M 200-430 (Bryan 330)
Instructor: Paul Guest

Restricted to Instructor Permission.

ENPW 4920 - The Poetry Capstone Course (Part Two)

Instructor: Lisa Spaar

This is the second part of a two-semester project [The Capstone Course (ENPW 4910/4920)] designed for fourth-year students in the Department’s Area Program in Poetry Writing.  The Capstone project is a year-long investigation of faculty and student-directed, shared texts that allows advanced poetry writing students to read widely and across disciplines in areas of individual aesthetic interest, to begin to think beyond the single poem and into ways poetry manuscripts can be organized, to become more deeply aware of their own patterns and evolving aesthetic, and to create new work.  The spring semester involves a combination of weekly discussion of individual student manuscripts and one-on-one conferring with the instructor.  After mid-term, students are assigned a graduate student mentor, who also offers the poetry manuscript a close reading.  The course culminates in the production by each student of a manuscript of original poetry.

OPEN ONLY TO 4TH-YEAR STUDENTS IN THE AREA PROGRAM IN POETRY WRITING BY PERMISSION OF INSTRUCTOR.

Literary Prose

ENLP 4550 - Topics in Literary Prose

Section 001 - Designing the Short Novel
T 200-430 (Bryan Hall 203)
Instructor: Jane Alison

This class is specifically for students in the Area Program in Literary Prose but open to anyone interested in exploring the design of short novels. We will examine how authors have worked within the narrow yet interestingly elastic boundaries of narratives that run 100 pages or so. Have writers developed multiple characters and spaces, or instead deepened only a few? How much time have they deployed? Have they worked with single or multiple points of view? Have they developed a knot of narrative strands or made a single strand especially knotted? Have they avoided strands altogether and worked with blocks? What shapes have they found for the whole? We’ll pay particular attention to ways that narratives follow or resist the famous dramatic arc, and to ways that even a “temporal” art can employ elements of visual design. You will read and respond, in discussion and writing, to a dozen short novels and will take part in mini-workshops of exercises crafted in response to readings. Texts may include works by César Aira, Nicholson Baker, Marguerite Duras, Jenny Erpenbeck, Gabriel García Márquez, Jamaica Kincaid, Tao Lin, Dorthe Nors, Joyce Carol Oates, Marie Redonnet, Philip Roth, Justin Torres, Jeanette Winterson, and Tobias Wolff.

INSTRUCTOR’S PERMISSION REQUIRED: please send a note discussing your interest in the class to jas2ad@virginia.edu.

ENLP 4720 - Area Program in Literary Prose Thesis Course

Section 001
M 330-600 (Bryan Hall 312)
Instructor: Christopher Tilghman

Directed writing project for students in the English Department's Undergraduate Area Program in Literary Prose, leading to completion of an extended piece of creative prose writing.

Medieval Literature

ENMD 3130 - Old Icelandic Literature in Translation

Section 001
TR 330-445 (Cocke Hall 115)
Instructor: John Casteen

A survey of major works written in Iceland from around 1100 to the end of the Middle Ages. The texts include several family and regional sagas, short narratives related to certain of these, to historiography of the settlement period, and to Iceland's conversion to Christianity, and a few selections from the Poetic Edda and the Edda of Snorri Sturluson.  All readings are in translation.

ENMD 3510 - Medieval European Literature in Translation

Section 001 - Women’s Voices in Medieval Texts 
MW 200-315 (Cocke Hall 115)
Instructor: Sara Torres

From stories of virgin martyrs to courtly damsels, from loathly ladies to biblical heroines, medieval audiences encountered countless female figures of desire, deviance, and devotion. Some of the women who emerge from the imaginative landscape of medieval texts inspire chivalric prowess and spiritual growth; others serve as allegorical figures for philosophical and theological ideas. Still others are vilified for their inconstancy and written off as gossip girls or “belles-dames sans merci.” Together we will explore representations of female vocality and cultural constructions of gender in several genres of medieval literature written by and about women. We will hear the voices of women “authors” themselves—both those who wrote lyrics, lais, and prose treatises and those who narrated devotional meditations or autobiographical accounts to amanuenses—and consider themes of courtly love, female exemplarity, domestic conduct, and sanctity. Readings will include works by Marie de France, Christine de Pisan, Margery Kempe, Giovanni Boccaccio, and Geoffrey Chaucer.

ENMD 4500-001 - Geoffrey Chaucer’s Adventures in Virtual Reality

TR 930-1045 (Bryan Hall 328)
Instructor: Elizabeth Fowler

The Book of the Duchess, The House of Fame, The Parliament of Fowls, and The Legend of Good Women, Chaucer’s four poems about dreams, are surreal, sweet, funny, philosophical, emotionally intense, and visually overstimulated.  They are even more interesting in our age of complex VR tech, because dreams provoke Chaucer to think about the experience of art in a way that’s directly relevant to the sensory and artistic issues that confront virtual reality game developers. We’ll explore the strategies that written language has for producing experiences in virtual reality: effects like immersion, presence, and para-sensory experience. How is it that we “see” and “feel” things when we read? How do we “go” places in stories? I’ve designed this course for curious beginners who will enjoy thinking and talking about what happens in art; no prior experience is necessary. Middle English is just different enough from ours to make its conjuring tricks more visible; we read slowly and catch it in the act. Probably two short written projects and two exams will be required, plus a little side-reading about VR and the history of visual art.

ENMD 4500-002 - Advanced Studies in Medieval Literature I

TR 330-445 (Bryan Hall 334)
Instructor: Peter Baker

ENMD 5200 - Beowulf

TR 1100-1215 (Bryan 334)
Instructor: Peter Baker

Renaissance Literature

ENRN 3110 - Literature of the Renaissance

Section 001 - Renaissance Lyric and the Making of the Self
TR 200-315 (Bryan Hall 328)
Instructor: Rebecca Rush

An introduction to the peculiar charms and challenges of lyric poetry in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, from the rollicking rhymes of John Skelton to the libertine lines of the Earl of Rochester. As we work through the most intricate and lively passages of Renaissance lyric together, we will ask: What counts as lyric? Why is lyric associated with passion and self-expression? How did lyric poetry reflect and transform Renaissance understandings of the self? Authors include Sidney, Shakespeare, Wroth, Donne, Jonson, Herbert, Herrick, Philips, and Milton.

ENRN 3220 - Shakespeare II

Lecture:
TR 1100-1215 (Wilson Hall 301)
Instructor: Clare Kinney

A survey of the second half of Shakespeare's career: the major tragedies and the late plays (the so-called “romances”).  Among the things we’ll be looking at: genre, gender, and performance; the power of love and the love of power in tragic and tragi-comic universes; alienation, transgression, “tragic knowledge”––and writing beyond tragedy.   

Plays we’ll read: Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, Macbeth, Antony and Cleopatra, The Winter’s Tale, The Tempest.

Course Requirements: Regular attendance at lectures and lively participation in discussion section; two 6-7 page papers; midterm; final.

Discussion Sections:

Section 101
R 1230-120 (Location TBA)

Section 102
F 1000-1050 (Bryan Hall 235)

Section 103
R 200-250 (Bryan Hall 334)

Section 104
F 1100-1150 (Cocke Hall 101)

Section 105
R 1230-120 (Bryan Hall 334)

Section 106
R 330-420 (New Cabell Hall 068)

ENRN 3250 - Milton: Classic Christian Iconoclast

TR 930-1045 (Ruffner Hall 179)
Instructor: Dan Kinney

In this course we will study the the interconnections between Milton's literary career and the general political and cultural ferment of Civil War England. We will sample the dizzying range of generic innovations and experiments that inform Milton's work from short early lyrics and prose pamphlets through Paradise Lost. Class requirements, lively participation, one short and one longer paper, and a final exam.

ENRN 3400 - Drama in English from its Beginnings to 1642

MW 200-315 (Shannon House 107)
Instructor: John Parker

This course surveys a wide range of medieval and Renaissance drama prior to the closing of the London theaters in 1642.  We'll begin reading (in translation) some Latin plays staged as part of the Mass on Easter and Christmas, before moving into the vernacular drama of the later Middle Ages — mainly cycle plays drawn from scripture and the apocrypha, but we'll also look at a saint's play and a morality.  The latter part of the course will cover the commercial drama staged in London during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.  Playwrights may include Marlowe, Kyd, Jonson, Middleton, Shakespeare, Webster and Ford.  The relation between our two periods will make up a major thematic preoccupation of the course: what happens during "the Renaissance"?  How different is it from "the Middle Ages"?  In what ways?

ENRN 4500 - Advanced Studies in Renaissance Literature

Section 001 - Afterlives of the Epic
TR 200-315 (Bryan Hall 330)
Instructor: Dan Kinney

What becomes of the epic, especially (but not only) in Renaissance England? Where has it been, and where does it still have to go? Why does the most elevated of literary modes in traditional reckonings end up seeming passe or impossible to so many moderns? Works to be read include Homer's epics, The Aeneid, The Inferno, Paradise Lost, Robinson Crusoe, The Dunciad, and The Waste Land. Class requirements: lively participation including brief email responses, two shorter or one more substantial term paper, and a final exam.

Section 002 - Reinventing Hamlet
TR 200-315 (Bryan Hall 310)
Instructor: Clare Kinney

Hamlet is the Shakespearean play everybody’s heard of; it is also perhaps the most mysterious and elusive. It has a huge afterlife in both elite and popular culture; it has been reinterpreted, appropriated and adapted by commentators and creative artists to serve very different agendas at various historical moments.  In this seminar we will first (re)read the play in some depth before exploring the resonance of its reshaping and revision in a variety of media.  We’ll look at dramatic reinventions  (e.g. Tom Stoppard’s Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead); novelistic reinventions (e.g. John Updike’s Gertrude and Claudius), cinematic reinventions (e.g. the Hamlet movies of Almereyda and Olivier); we’ll also pay attention to global Hamlet and to the critical reception of the play. Why does this particular work provoke so many creative reinventions?  And what do its more subversive rewritings suggest about the cultural forces underlying the apparently unceasing need to revisit and/or “correct” and/or supplement Shakespeare’s project?

Course requirements: regular attendance and lively participation in discussion; an oral presentation; one short and one long paper; a series of e-mail responses to our readings.

ENRN 4530 - Seminar in Medieval and Renaissance Studies

Section 001 - Shakespeare's History Plays
MW 330-445 (Bryan Hall 334)
Instructor: Katharine Maus

Shakespeare was fascinated by history throughout his career—what was possibly his first play (Henry VI part 2, originally called The First Part of the Contention), was based on English history, and so was his second-to-last, Henry VIII, or All is True. In between he wrote a great many plays based on historical events in medieval England and Scotland, and in ancient Rome. Many of these plays are still frequently performed and their resonances in the modern world emphasized (in New York City just this past summer, a Shakespeare in the Park production of Julius Caesar controversially represented the titular character as a Trump-like figure.) In all his history plays Shakespeare asks fundamental questions about how political communities  are constituted, about what makes authority seems legitimate or illegitimate, about whether there is a connection between character and destiny, about how moral rules change in times of crisis, and about how and why the answers to these questions seem to vary depending on circumstances and cultural context. In this seminar we will read and discuss a number of Shakespeare’s history plays; I have not yet designed the syllabus but probable assignments include Henry VI, part 2, Richard III, Richard II, Henry IV part 1, Henry V, Julius Caesar, and Coriolanus. Where appropriate, we will also avail ourselves of live and film performances.  Writing assignments: 5-page midterm paper, 10 page final paper.

Restoration and Eighteenth Century Literature

ENEC 3200 - Eighteenth-Century Women Writers

TR 1100-1215 (New Cabell 309)
Instructor: Alison Hurley

During the eighteenth century, social, economic, and technological developments converged to alter the ways in which texts were produced and consumed.  The result of these innovations was a new print culture that offered women the opportunity to step onto the public stage as professional authors for the first time.  Female authors, nevertheless, remained intensely aware of their “delicate situation” within the literary public sphere.  They responded to this situation by deploying a variety of authorial strategies that ingeniously combined self-promotion with self-protection in order to legitimize their appearance in print.  This class will be particularly interested in examining the relationship between gender and genre during the eighteenth century.  Our readings will highlight a series of specific literary forms – conduct literature, drama, poetry, the novel – each of which implicates gender in distinctive and compelling ways.  Our authors will include, but not be limited to, Aphra Behn, Anne Finch, Eliza Haywood, Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire, Jane Austen and Mary Wollstonecraft.

Class requirements will include weekly reading-response papers, frequent reading quizzes, two essays, and a final exam.  Our class meetings will be largely discussion based.

ENEC 4500 - Advanced Studies in Eighteenth-Century Literature I

Section 001 - English Poetry 1660-1789
T 300-530 (New Cabell 068)
Instructor: Michael Suarez

This class will focus on the close reading of English poetic texts from the Restoration to the French Revolution.

Nineteenth Century Literature

ENNC 3210 - Wordsworth, Byron, and Austen

TR 330-445 (Bryan Hall 328)
Instructor: Andrew Stauffer

A survey of the work of three Romantic-era British authors: poets William Wordsworth and Lord Byron, and novelist Jane Austen. Each is committed to a different brand of realism that runs athwart and interacts productively with the more visionary tendencies of their contemporary Romantics. We will read widely in their works and discuss their imaginative relations to one another, and to other writers of the period. 2 papers, midterm and final exam.

ENNC 3500 - Nineteenth Century Topics

Section 001 - Dangerous Women
TR 1100-1215 (Bryan Hall 235)
Instructor: Cristina Griffin

When the phrase “nasty woman” rose to the forefront of our cultural discourse over the past year, the label rested on a long-standing conception that women can be dangerous just by being women. In this class, we will look at the particular formations of dangerous women that materialized in the nineteenth century, an era in which women simultaneously remained held down by the law and yet unbound by newly possible social roles. Across texts by Jane Austen, Robert Browning, Christina Rossetti, Mary Elizabeth Braddon, George Eliot, George Bernard Shaw, and Thomas Hardy, among others, we will consider what precisely made women dangerous as well as the other side of the coin: what put women in danger? What forms of female agency, sexuality, or sociability generate power and which engender fear? And what do we make of men’s roles: what does it look like to be a dangerous man or a man in danger? How do nineteenth-century notions of danger reify a gender binary and what are the ways in which this binary breaks down or becomes fluid? By reading texts across genres—some novels, short stories, poems, essays, and a play—we will immerse ourselves in the particular history of gender, fear, and power articulated by nineteenth-century writers while also avidly seeking out points of connection between these Victorian conceptions of dangerous women and those of our own twenty-first century. Students in this course are forewarned that they will be in danger of reading dangerously fascinating texts, and will be expected to generate dangerously fascinating ideas in response.

ENNC 4500 - Advanced Studies in Nineteenth Century Literature I

Section 001 - Nineteenth Century Novels Up Close and Philosophical
TR 1230-145 (Bryan Hall 330)
Instructor: Karen Chase

We will concentrate on three great novels of the Nineteenth Century: Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina, Dostoevsky’s The Brothers Karamazov, and Eliot’s Middlemarch. Our aim is to examine how these authors and works approach life’s big questions: meaning, purpose, vocation, ethics, pleasure. There is no didactic intent or doctrinal pursuit: our investigations are philosophical and literary. We will assume that although fictions are artificial while life is actual, there is yet a certain amount of craft and performance involved in living and (of course) even more in writing. Therefore, it is fair to analyze our own attitudes alongside those we find expressed in each novel and by each author. We study possibilities, images, metaphors and avoid searching for answers or solutions. Be prepared to write thoughtful weekly responses and a seminar paper. There will be reading quizzes.

Modern and Contemporary Literature

ENMC 3500 - Studies in Modern and Contemporary Literature

Section 001 - Modernist Fiction into Film
TR 1100-1215 (Bryan 328)
Instructor: Victor Luftig

We’ll read some great Modernist novels and stories and view film adaptations of them, considering how formal elements of the fiction serve the movies’ consideration of political and social issues: the course’s central question is whether the distinctive ways the fiction was written are an aid to, a barrier to, or irrelevant to the way the films have responded to urgent contemporary matters.  We’ll begin with some famous short stories, such as Conrad’s “Heart of Darkness,” Joyce’s “The Dead,” and Faulkner’s “Barn Burning,” that were made into films just before and during the Reagan era (Apocalypse Now, John Huston’s film of the Joyce story, and the American Short Story film series’ adaptation of the Faulkner) before considering Forster’s novel A Passage to India and David Lean’s film of that novel (and in particular their treatment of race).  We will then move ahead to works adapted in the 1990s in films that foregrounded gender issues (including the short story “Guests of the Nation,” in relation to The Crying Game, and Virginia Woolf’s Orlando)—one of these will serve as the subject for the course’s first of two short papers--before turning back to novels made into films in the 1960s (such as DH Lawrence’s Women in Love) and concluding with texts made into films in the last decade or so, such as Their Eyes Were Watching God and The Great Gatsby.  Though we’ll discuss at least one film in relation to each fictional work we read, and though we’ll spend some time in class looking at clips from those films, this is not a course about film; it’s a course that treats film as a way of thinking about what use can be made of the stories’ remarkable techniques.  No prior familiarity with any of the stories or films is necessary.  The course grade will be based on short papers, exams, including a final, and, as appropriate, discussion.

Section 002 - Modern American Poetry
MW 330-445 (New Cabell 315)
Instructor: Kevin Hart

This seminar introduces students to a range of American poets living and working, for the most part, in the second half of the twentieth century. Of particular interest are the ways in which these poets responded to other poetries than those written in English, especially to the poetries of Europe and South America. What can poets learn by translating poetry from another language? What are the limits of what one can and cannot do in writing poems in English? How does “American poetry” change by exposing itself to influences from Europe and South America? These questions will be considered by way of reading poems (and translations) by Robert Bly, Louise Glück, W. S. Merwin, Charles Simic, A. E. Stallings, Mark Strand, and Charles Wright. Students will also read poems, in English translation, by a range of European and South American poets, including (but not limited to) Carlos Drummond de Andrade, Philippe Jaccottet, Roberto Juarroz, Eugenio Montale, Vasko Popa, and Tomas Tranströmer.

ENMC 3559 - Race and Ethnicity in Latinx Literature

TR 930-1045 (New Cabell 338)
Instructor: Carmen Lamas

In this course we will examine the construction of race and ethnicity in Latinx literature by examining key texts by individuals from varying Latinx groups who live in the United States. This course will examine both how US-American identity shapes Latinx notions and constructions of race and how the authors’ connections with Latin America and the Caribbean do the same. In the end, we will explore race and ethnicity from a hemispheric perspective in order to inquire as to its specific manifestation in Latinx literature and culture. All reading, writing and discussions are in English.

ENMC 4500 - Advanced Studies in Modern and Contemporary Literature

Section 001 - Contemporary Women's Texts
TR 1100-1215 (Cocke Hall 101)
Instructor: Susan Fraiman

This course takes up recent Anglophone works by women across multiple genres and referencing a range of national contexts. Primary texts include visual as well as literary forms. A selection of secondary materials will help to gloss their formal, thematic, and ideological characteristics while giving students a taste of contemporary theory in such areas as gender, queer, and postcolonial studies.  Possible works (still to be determined) include fiction by Cristina García, Gish Jen, Jhumpa Lahiri, Mary Gaitskill, and Chimamanda Adichie; a graphic narrative by Alison Bechdel; a film by Lebanese-American director Rola Nashef; images by photographer Zanele Muholi; Fatima Mernissi’s memoir about girlhood in a Moroccan harem. Among our likely concerns will be the juxtaposition of verbal and visual elements in a single text; depictions of queer, raced, immigrant, and transnational subjectivities; narratives that make “truth claims” and how such claims affect the reader; representations of growing up, aging, migration, maternity, violence, marriage, creativity, diverse sexualities, and work; ties and tensions among women across boundaries of nation, generation, class, and race.  One project of the course will be to explore its own premise that “women’s texts” is a useful and meaningful category. Two papers and a final exam.

Section 002 - Multiethnic American Fiction
TR 1100-1215 (Bryan Hall 330)
Instructor: Caroline Rody

American authors from a wide range of backgrounds have infused contemporary American fiction with new stories.  This course will observe transformations of literary form, discourse, plot, and character in an era of cultural and linguistic multiplicity; global migration; contested notions of racial, gendered, religious, sexual, and national identity; and rising interest in both ethnic histories and possibilities for cross-ethnic encounter.  Secondary material will include critical and theoretical essays.  Primary texts will be drawn from the novels and stories of some of the following writers:  Carlos Bulosan, James Baldwin, John Okada, Grace Paley, Alfred Kazin, Lore Segal, Toni Morrison, Maxine Hong Kingston, Bapsi Sidhwa, Louise Erdrich, Sandra Cisneros, Bharati Mukherjee, Jhumpa Lahiri, Chang-rae Lee, Gish Jen, Nathan Englander, Mat Johnson, Edwidge Danticat, Galina Vromen, Karen Tei Yamashita, Nam Le, Rabih Alameddine, Nicole Krauss, Junot Diaz, Mohsin Hamid.

Requirements: active reading and participation, short response papers, 2 major essays (total pages=20), class leading (in groups).

Section 003 - Poetry in a Global Age
MW 200-315 (New Cabell 303)
Instructor: Jahan Ramazani

How does poetry articulate and respond to the globalizing processes that accelerate in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries? In this seminar on modern and contemporary global poetry in English, we will explore the world in poetry and poetry in the world. The writers we will read range from modernist poets like Eliot, Yeats, H.D., and Claude McKay to contemporary poets of Ireland, India, Africa, Britain, and the Caribbean, such as Heaney, Walcott, Arjun Kolatkar, Karen Press, and Daljit Nagra. Among requirements are active participation; reading quizzes; your framing of discussion questions to help lead discussion; and two 8-10 page papers. Our texts will be from volumes 1 and 2 of The Norton Anthology of Modern and Contemporary Poetry, third edition, as supplemented by other poems and critical texts.

Section 004 - The Global Novel After Globalism
TR 200-315 (New Cabell 291)
Instructor: Jesse Bordwin

Around 2014, the English department at UVa created the undergraduate track in Global English Literature and Culture, so that students might “extend their study into the widest contexts of international literary achievement” while also becoming “globally literate citizens of this new millennium.” That moment was one of many that marked the ascendency of “the global” as a critical formation within the academy and a dominant milieu in which we as English scholars conduct our work. But then something—or a number of different things—happened, including Britain’s exit from the European Union, the election of Donald Trump, and the rise of far-right and nationalist movements around the world. As we continue to heal from our own encounter with toxic revanchism in Charlottesville, one of the questions with which we are left, one that proves instigative for this course, is whether or not this paradigm shift fundamentally destabilizes the descriptive power of “the global.” In turning to the contemporary Anglophone novel, we will consider how literature represents, revises, elevates, and explodes ideas of the global—as well as the national and the local—as an operative term both within English departments and one that encompasses the larger story of the post-war consensus in politics, economics, popular culture, and literature and literary marketplaces.

Section 006 - Sports and Transnational Culture
TR 1230-145 (Bryan Hall 312)
Instructor: Sandhya Shukla

*Combined Section with AMST 4500-002

This course considers sports and discourses about sports as constituting a unique space of cultural production, consumption and circulation.  Here is where we can find complex discussions of race, gender, nation and encounter.  We will closely read novels, films, short stories and television programs from the United States, Britain and the Americas, including those by Joseph O’Neill, Bernard Malamud, Jim Bouton, Nick Hornby, CLR James and Eduardo Galeano.

ENMC 4530 - Seminar in Modern Literature and Culture

The Dystopian Novel

TR 330-445 (Maury Hall 113)
Instructor: Mrinalini Chakravorty

“We live in difficult times, in times of monstrous chimeras and evil dreams and criminal follies,” Joseph Conrad wrote at the beginning of the 20th C.  This course will explore the emergence of dystopia as a genre for the modern novel.  If utopias are concerned with conjuring the perfect society—a ‘good place’ that is yet ‘no place’—dystopias imagine the opposite.  Celebrated dystopian novels such as Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World, George Orwell’s 1984, Margaret Atwood’s The Handsmaid’s Tale, Yevgeny Zamiantin’s We and more recent others distill the terrors of modern life onto a terribly estranged future.  Dystopias, in other words, offer apocalyptic visions; they summon an aesthetic of speculation, pessimism, horror, and dysfunction to caution against modern developments that are generally seen as benevolent.

It is notable that dystopia often takes the form of political and science fiction.  In our study, we will seek to understand why that is the case.  What elements cohere the genre of dystopian fiction?  What elements are borrowed from other forms?  What invented anew?  And finally, what is peculiar to dystopia as a genre all its own?   It is commonly thought that a singular feature of dystopian fiction is that it interrogates the rise of various state forms, both totalitarian and democratic, in the post-industrial age.  What happens, dystopian works ask, if we distort modernity’s most exalted achievements to an extreme?  Do conditions of modern living such as of surveillance, conformity, comfort, milatarism, mechanization, mobilty, reproductive facity, incarceration, medicalization, and scientificity lead to better futures?  The bleak worlds that dystopias imagine starkly suggest that they do not.  Instead, dystopian novels ask that readers contemplate, and even critique, the ethical cost of our acceptance of modern social conditions, the depletion of freedom, autonomy, and humanity.  It is this non-mimetic, socially responsive dimension of dystopian novels that this course will ultimately probe.

The seminar will survey major works of dystopian fiction from the late-19thC onward.  Alongside such classics as Wells’ The Time Machine, Huxley’s Brave New World, Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four, and Atwood’s A Handmaid’s Tale, we will also read work by Octavia Butler, Kazuo Ishiguro,  Han Kang, M.R. Carey and others.   The syllabus will include brief philosophical and critical readings on utopia, science, satire, feminism, race, capitalism, and modernity.  We will also view a few films (Blade Runner; Babadook) and analyze a graphic novel by Keiji Nakazawa.

A Modern Literature and Culture seminar, this course is open to all others who are interested.  Course requirements include two short papers and a longer research project.

Section 002 - The Global City
TR 930-1045 (New Cabell 036)
Instructor: Sandhya Shukla

This course explores the representation and social life of the global city.  We look at cities that have been made by flows -- of people, capital and ideas -- and that function more as global, rather than national, or regional spaces.  And we explore how key historical experiences, of war, colonialism, capitalism, and migration have shaped what we think of as modern (and postmodern) metropoles. We consider cultural exchange as a major theme of novels and films, and also interrogate class, racial and ethnic stratification that challenges any simple notion of community.  With a rigorous interdisciplinary approach, we ask questions about form, of both the texts and the cities themselves. Though we will center our semester’s discussions on three major global cities, New York, Los Angeles and London, we will also broaden our inquiry at times to consider other actual and imagined urban formations.  And to deepen our understanding of the global city, we will interrogate the constitutive terms through an engagement with critical theory on space, difference and encounter.  With so many different themes and sub-themes, ranging widely across regions and nations, our work this term of course only scratches the surface of the topic of the global city; and students will research and write final papers that take up any of a variety of approaches, and materials.  Readings may include works by authors such as: Teju Cole, William Gibson, Cynthia Kadohata, Chang-rae Lee, China Mieville, Geoff Nicholson, Joseph O’Neill, Salman Rushdie, Zadie Smith, Karen Tei Yamashita, Saskia Sassen, Marshall Berman, Michael Keith, and Michel de Certeau.

 

American Literature

ENAM 3140 - African-American Literature II

Section 001
TR 930-1045 (New Cabell 032)
Instructor: Timothy Griffiths

African American literature was, according to Kenneth Warren, a literary genre born during the early Jim Crow era in order to address the specific problems of racial segregation, lynching, and disenfranchisement  against black people. It ended not because racial discrimination ended, but because the territory, frameworks, and promises upon which this literature was founded have radically shifted. No longer only about black people’s lack of rights as American citizens, nor a response only to forms of social oppression, writing by black U.S. authors — or, more precisely, literature about the experiences of black people living in the U.S. — has become something that goes beyond what was originally intended for the genre. This raises a number of questions. Given that African American literature is still a widely-used scholarly term as well as a way to organize artistic activism — despite its “end” — what is the future of this body of work? Is the term merely historically useful, or is it being fruitfully revised or recuperated to account for and address antiblack racism in the twenty-first century? If African American literature has ended, then is there a new and necessary organizing term for work by black authors, from Toni Morrison to Colson Whitehead? What anxieties, progressions, or changes in the analysis of social identity — particularly through intersectionality — have emerged that have changed the way literature by black authors is studied and written? And finally, what could older artistic ethics of African American writing teach us about the problems and challenges facing the artistic response to antiblack racism in the present? Our questions, while beginning with a brief prelude on the invention of African American literature as a literary movement between 1890–1930, will primarily track the development of African American literature from the early rumblings of the Civil Rights movement in the 1940s to the recent wave of literature and art oriented toward ending police violence. Along the way, we will pay service to and properly historicize movements in African American cultural production, while figuring the way black feminism, queer activism, postmodernism, transnational thought, postcolonialism, class-based analysis, and neoliberalism have altered the prerogatives and practices of African American literature over time. Our class likely will address a variety of short works by a wide range of writers, which may include Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison, Ann Petry, James Baldwin, Lorraine Hansberry, Nikki Giovanni, Amiri Baraka, Toni Morrison, Gayl Jones, Audre Lorde, Toni Cade Bambara, Alice Walker, Octavia Butler, Ntozake Shange, Samuel R. Delany, Colson Whitehead, Jacqueline Woodson, and Ta-Nehisi Coates. Class will hybridize lecture and student-facilitated discussion. Assignments will include one or two discussion papers, a hybrid take-home/in-class midterm, and a final paper.

ENAM 3240 - Faulkner

Lecture:
MW 1000-1050 (New Cabell 032)
Instructor: Stephen Railton

Yoknapatawpha County, set at the intersection of southern history and the modernist novel, is one of the world's great imaginative achievements. In this course we'll look closely at many of the fictions Faulkner set there, from dust to dust -- i.e. from Flags in the Dust (his first Yoknapatawpha novel) to Intruder in the Dust (published two decades later). Other readings will include The Sound and the Fury, As I Lay Dying, Light in August, Absalom, Absalom! and Go Down, Moses, as well as half a dozen or so short stories. You'll write two 6-7 page essays and take a final exam.

Discussion Sections:

R 330-420 (New Cabell 209)

R 430-520 (New Cabell 209)

ENAM 3559 - America and the Global South

TR 330-445 (Bryan 235)
Instructor: Lisa Goff

Students in this course will examine and interpret conceptions of America from the point of view of novelists, filmmakers, journalists, and scholars in the Global South. American and Global South landscapes will be a focus of the class, as will images, artifacts, and material culture that reveal Global South views of the United States.

TENTATIVE READING/VIEWING LIST 
Fiction, memoir, documentary, film: 
Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, short stories 
The Beautiful Things That Heaven Allows, Dinaw Mengestu 
We Need New Names, NoViolet Bulawayo 
The Other Side of Immigration (2009), director Roy Germano 
Under the Same Moon (2007), director Patricia Riggens 
No Telephone to Heaven, Michelle Cliff 
Brother, I’m Dying, Edwidge Danticat 
Undocumented, Dan-el Padilla Peralta 
The Namesake, Jumpa Lahiri. 
The Red Convertible, Louise Erdrich 
Criticism and commentary: 
Jean and John Comaroff 
Rina Swentzell 
Edward Ayers 
Ta-Nehisi Coates

ENAM 4500 - Advanced Studies in American Literature

Section 001 - The Novel and the Romance
TR 1230-145 (New Cabell 415)
Instructor: Emily Ogden

Romance is a term that has meant many things to many people, but the common denominator is escape: the reader of romances is fleeing from real life. Writers of nineteenth-century novels were often anxious to distinguish their work from romance. But what is so bad about escapism? And what did novel-writers think they were providing instead—education? philosophical reflection? high art? We will ask these and other questions as we read US fiction, starting with the first American novels and continuing through the better part of the nineteenth century. Texts may include Tabitha Tenney’s Female Quixotism, Charles Brockden Brown’s Edgar Huntly, James Fenimore Cooper’s The Last of the Mohicans, and Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The Blithedale Romance, among others. 

Section 003 - Voices of the Civil War
W 330-600 (Bryan 312)
Instructors: Gary Gallagher, Stephen Cushman

Restricted to Instructor Permission.

This course explores major themes relating to the American Civil War through the words of individuals who experienced it. Using wartime and postwar writings, fiction and nonfiction, as well as photography and film, students will focus on why the war came; how it evolved from a struggle for Union to one for Union and freedom; how the conflict affected civilians; why soldiers fought; and how participants on each side chose to remember the conflict. The “voices” in the course will include men and women, white and black, military and nonmilitary, and Union and Confederate. The reading load for this course is not light, and students with only casual interest in the topic should not enroll.

ENAM 4559 - Carribean Latinx Literature

T 330-600 (New Cabell 411)
Instructor: Carmen Lamas

* Combined Section with AMST 4321

In this seminar we will explore novels, plays, short stories and poems by Latinx writers from Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, and Cuba. While these writers’ genealogies emerge from these island countries, we will analyze how their lives in New York, New Jersey, Boston and Miami impact how they narrate the Latinx experience as situated between the US and their home countries in the Caribbean. Possible authors/poets include Esmeralda Santiago, Justin Torres, Julia Alvarez, Cristina García and Rafael Campo. Plays/musicals include Ana in the Tropics by Nilo Cruz and In the Heights by Quiara Alegría Hudes and Lin-Manuel Miranda. All readings, discussions and assignments are in English.

Genre Studies

ENGN 3840 - Satire

TR 930-1045 (Maury Hall 115)
Instructor: John O'Brien

What is satire? Most of us feel like can identify satire when we see it, and it probably says something not particularly encouraging about our moment in history that it has produced a lot of great satire. At the same time, we have also recently seen how satire can mark a limit where art prompts violent reaction, as when the Hollywood movie The Interview, a satire on the North Korean leader Kim Jong Il, led the North Korean government to launch a cyberattack on the film’s producer Sony Pictures. Satire gives the lie to the idea that art is not concerned with the real world.

In this course, we will work together to understand the contours of this elusive but enduring form. We will read beast fables and poetry, but our central examples will be fictional texts ranging from the ancient world to the present day, in the form of fictions by authors like Margaret Atwood (The Handmaid’s Tale) and Thomas Pynchon (The Crying of Lot 49), and Paul Beatty (The Sell-Out).  In the course of our reading and discussions, we’ll also try to reach some consensus on what satire is, how it is distinguished from comedy in general, and what work it does (and does not do) in society. Requirements: frequent (non-satirical) participation, quizzes, short writing assignments, midterm and final examinations.

ENGN 4500 - Advanced Studies in Literary Genres

Section 001 - Tragedy
MW 330-445 (Maury Hall 113)
Instructor: Paul Cantor

This course studies the theory and practice of tragedy across the centuries in different cultures. It is open to all students; it is NOT restricted to comparative literature majors or to fourth-year students. We begin with the three major philosopher-theorists of tragedy: Aristotle, Hegel, and Nietzsche. We then look at the two greatest eras of tragic drama: Ancient Athens (Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides) and Renaissance England (Marlowe, Shakespeare, and John Ford). We continue with later tragic dramatists (Schiller, Pushkin), as we examine how tragedy develops in a variety of countries. We then analyze how tragedy migrates to another medium (the novel) in George Eliot’s The Mill on the Floss. Finally we discuss Eugene O’Neill’s effort to recreate Greek tragedy in his Mourning Becomes Electra. All foreign language works are read in English translation. Requirements include a seminar presentation and a seminar paper.

ENGN 5559 - Who sees; Who speaks:  The narrative Situation

W 330-600 (New Cabell 303)
Instructor: Christopher Tilghman

What does the narrator know and how does he/she/it know it?  Where is the narrator; when is the narrator? Through what evidence on the page do we know that he/she/it is present, or absent?  This course is about the fundamental choices – made either explicitly or implicitly – open to a writer in selecting and developing the appropriate narrative mood and voice for telling his or her story.  Our focus is on the structure of narrative, and the reading list attempts to give examples of the types identified by narrative theorists.  We’ll begin with a very quick survey of theoreticians such as Gérard Genette, Gerald Price, Dorrit Cohn, and Monika Fludernik and then read a dozen or so novels, most of them novella length.  The list will probably include Abbé Prévost's Manon Lescaut, Edouard Dujardin’s We’ll to the Woods No More; Knut Hamsun’s Hunger; James’ What Maisie Knew; Mann's Death in Venice; Robbe-Grillet's Jealousy; Berlin Childhood around 1900 by Walter Benjamin;  The Street of Crocodiles by Bruno Schulz;  selections from the Recherche du temps perdu; as well as a handful of more contemporary works, including Muriel Spark’s The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie, Toni Morrison’s Jazz, and Ben Lerner's Leaving the Atocha Station.

English Pedagogy

ENPG 3800 - Tutoring Peer Writers

MW 200-315 (Bryan Hall 203)
Instructor: Marcus Meade

Prepares undergraduates to tutor peer writers by introducing them to theories of writing and practices of peer tutoring. Successful completion of the course will qualify students to apply for part-time paid peer tutoring positions in the Writing Center. Students may also use this course to prepare for volunteering as writing tutors in their local communities.

Criticism

ENCR 4500 - Advanced Studies in Literary Criticism

Section 001 - Race in American Places
T 530-800 (Bryan Hall 332)
Instructor: Kenrick Grandison

This interdisciplinary seminar uses the method of Critical Landscape Analysis to explore how everyday places and spaces, “landscapes,” are involved in the negotiation of power in American society.  Landscapes, as we engage the idea, may encompass seemingly private spaces (within the walls of a suburban bungalow or of a government subsidized apartment) to seemingly public spaces (the vest pocket park in lower Manhattan where the Occupy Movement was launched in September 2011; the Downtown Mall, with its many privately operated outdoor cafés, that occupy the path along which East Main Street once flowed freely in Charlottesville; or even the space of invisible AM and FM radio waves that the FCC supposedly regulates in the public’s interest).  We launch our exploration by considering landscapes as arenas of the Culture Wars.  With this context, we unearth ways in which places are planned, designed, constructed, and mythologized in the struggle to assert and enforce social (especially racial) distinctions, difference, and hierarchy.  You will be moved to understand how publicly financed freeways were planned not only to facilitate some citizens’ modern progress, but also to block others from  accessing rights, protections, and opportunities to which casually we believe all "Americans" are entitled.  We study landscapes not only as represented in written and non-written forms, but also through direct sensory, emotional, and intellectual experience during two mandatory field trips to places in our region.  In addition to informal group exercises and individual mid-term exam, critical field trip reflection paper, and final exam, you are required to complete in small groups a final research project on a topic you choose that relates to the seminar.  Past topics have ranged from the racial politics of farmers’ markets in gentrifying inner cities to the gender--and the transgender exclusion—politics of  universal standards for public restroom pictograms.  Students showcase such results in an informal symposium that culminates the semester.  Not only will you expand the complexity and scope of your critical thinking abilities, but also you will never again experience as ordinary the spaces and places you encounter from day to day.

Section 002 - Critical Race Theory
TR 930-1045 (Bryan 312)
Instructor: Marlon Ross

What does race mean in the late 20th and early 21st century?  Given the various ways in which race as a biological “fact” has been discredited, why and how does race continue to have vital significance in politics, economics, education, culture, arts, mass media, and everyday social realities?  How has the notion of race shaped, and been shaped by, changing relations to other experiences of identity stemming from sexuality, class, disability, multiculturalism, nationality, and globalism?  This course surveys major trends in black literary and cultural theory from the 1960s to the present, focusing on a series of critical flashpoints that have occurred over the last several decades. These flashpoints include: 1) the crisis over black authenticity during the Black Power/Black Arts movement; 2) the schisms related to womanism (or women of color feminism), focused on Alice Walker’s novel The Color Purple and the Steven Spielberg film adaptation; 3) the debate over the social construction of race (poststructuralist theory); 4) the debate over queer racial identities, focused on two films, Cheryl Dunye’s The Watermelon Woman and Barry Jenkins’ 2016 film Moonlight; 5) racial violence and the law, focused on the Ferguson and the Black Lives Matter movement; and 6) the aesthetic movement called Afrofuturism.  Other reading will include a variety of theoretical essays and chapters drawn from different disciplines, including legal theory, film and media studies, sociology, history, political theory, and hip hop studies. While concentrating on theories of race deriving from African American studies, we’ll also touch on key texts from Native American, Asian-American, and Chicanx studies. The goal of the course is to give you a solid grounding in the vocabulary, key figures, concepts, debates, and discursive styles comprising the broad sweep of theoretical race studies from the late-twentieth century to the present, and to nurture your own theorizing about race and its deep cultural impact.

Section 003 - Aesthetics and Politics
MW 330-445 (The Rotunda Room 150)
Instructor: Rita Felski

This course considers the relationship between aesthetics and politics via a survey of key terms in literature and the visual arts, including realism, modernism, the avant-garde, kitsch, camp, postmodernism, and the sublime. Other topics to be discussed include the museum, the role of race and gender in aesthetics, old and new directions in the sociology of literature and art, and the recent “return to beauty.” 

Special Topics in Literature

ENSP 3300 - Literary Editing

MW 330-445 (New Cabell 395)
Instructor: Jeb Livingood

This course provides an opportunity to learn how to edit and publish a book-length project—everything from screening manuscripts to graphic design—in both print and reflowable ePub formats. The course teaches you the fundamentals of creating projects in Adobe InDesign, the dominant desktop publishing software in the publishing industry. Due to time constraints, some class content is flipped, which means you will watch instructional videos outside of class, and then try to implement those techniques during class time with your peers and the instructor in lab sessions. There will also be in-class exercises designed to stimulate class discussion and guide you through your final projects (one print; one electronic), as well as homework assignments on The Chicago Manual of Style. Students must bring their own PC or Mac laptop computers (not Chromebooks) to class, and rent InDesign software from Adobe for most of the term. Students will also pay for a print-on-demand version of their project, which typically runs from $7 to $21.

ENSP 3559 - 20th-Century American Bestsellers

TR 930-1045 (The Rotunda Room 150)
Instructor: John Unsworth

Participants do five original research assignments on a single bestseller, and take two exams focused on class readings and discussion.  Assignments include a physical description of a first edition, a publication history, biographical notes on the author, a reception history, and a critical essay about the chosen bestseller. Assignments normally become part of a Web-accessible database of information about 20th-century American bestsellers.

For the research of past students, and the most recent syllabus, see: https://bestsellers.lib.virginia.edu/

ENSP 4500 - Advanced Studies in Special Topics in Literature

Section 001 - Migrant Europe
MW 330-445 (Monroe Hall 114)
Instructor: Sarah Cole

From an American perspective, Europe usually appears as a point of origin—an ancient, traditional society, which sent enterprising immigrants from the “old country” to our New World. Yet, when we explore the literature and history of modern Europe, we see a very different view: a cultural landscape full of movement and change. In the past half century, Europe has been transformed by the end of the Cold War, the collapse of the “Iron Curtain,” the creation of the European Union, and the arrival of immigrants from former colonies. Taking a cue from current debates about a “migrant crisis” in Europe, this course will re-examine major works of modern European literature by focusing on depictions of migration, ethnic minority identity, and shifting borders. Our main texts, ranging from the nineteenth century to the present, will include novels (George Eliot’s Daniel Deronda, Claire de Duras’s Ourika, Günter Grass’s The Tin Drum), poems (such as Pushkin’s “Bronze Horseman” and Celan’s “Death Fugue”), and films (such as My Beautiful Laundrette and Hate [La haine]). All non-English works will be read in translation.

Course requirements will include several short writing assignments, a research paper, and an in-class presentation, as well as active participation in seminar discussions.

Section 002 - Detective Fiction
MW 200-315 (The Rotunda Room 150)
Instructor: Stephen Railton

Why is reading about violent death something so many generations of readers have wanted to do? We’ll track this issue through three centuries and across four continents, from the Rue Morgue in Paris where C. Auguste Dupin solves the first mystery in the history of the genre to the mean streets down which the hard-boiled detective must go.  We'll see what happens when the hard-boiled detective becomes a woman, or when the private eye is replaced by a team of police.  Who done it?  Edgar Allan Poe, Conan Doyle, Agatha Christie, Dashiell Hammett, Sue Grafton and Scott Turow, among half a dozen more writers.  You'll give an oral report and write several short assignments, as well as a longer (8-10 page) seminar essay.

ENSP 5820 - The Culture of London Past and Present

Location and Time TBA
Instructors: Clare Kinney, Michael Levenson
Restricted to Instructor Permission

This is an independent study rubric.  The course is restricted to students who have previously participated in the summer study abroad “Culture of London” program and who now wish to embark on a research project based on their London experience.

Related Courses in Other Departments

CPLT 2020 - History of European Literature II (4 Credits)

Lecture:
TR 1230-145 (Astronomy Building 265)
Instructor: Paul Cantor
Cross-listed with ENGL 2020.

This course surveys European literature from the seventeenth century to the twentieth.  Although it builds upon work in CPLT 2010, 2020 is a self-contained course and can certainly be taken by students who have not taken 2010.  As a course in literary history, it seeks to develop an understanding of period concepts, such as “Romantic” and “modern,” as well as concepts of genre, such as “the novel.” Among the topics to be discussed are the rise of the novel, the nature of the Enlightenment, the Romantic revolution in poetry, the new role of women in literature, responses to revolution and imperialism, nihilism and modern literature, and the issue of postmodernism.  Readings include (sometimes in the form of selections) Tartuffe, Robinson Crusoe, Candide, Faust, Persuasion, Wuthering Heights, Notes from Underground, and Waiting for Godot, as well as poetry by Blake, T. S. Eliot, and Rilke and short stories by Kafka. All foreign language works will be read in English translation.  Two lectures and one section meeting per week.  Requirements:  three papers and a final examination, as well as regular attendance and participation in discussion sections.  The course fulfills the Second Writing Requirement, and 3 hours of it can be counted toward the English major under the “literature in translation” option; under the ENGL 2020 rubric, it can be used in lieu of an ENLT course as the pre-requisite for the English major.  

Discussion Sections:

Section 101
R 200-250 (Shannon House 107)
Instructor: Thomas Berenato

Section 102
R 300-350 (Shannon House 107)
Instructor: Thomas Berenato

CPLT 3750 - Women, Childhood, Autobiography

TR 1100-1215 (New Cabell 407)
Instructor: Lorna Martens

Cross-cultural readings in women's childhood narratives. Emphasis on formal as well as thematic aspects.

CPLT 3760 - Ways of Telling Stories: Eighteenth-Century Fiction

TR 200-315 (New Cabell 407)
Instructor: Lorna Martens

Comparative studies in the European novel. Dominant novel types, including the fictional memoir, the novel in letters, and the comic "history."

CPLT 4990 - Comparative Literature Seminar: Tragedy

MW 330-445 (Maury Hall 113)
Instructor: Paul Cantor

*Cross-listed with ENGN 4500.

This course studies the theory and practice of tragedy across the centuries in different cultures. It is open to all students; it is NOT restricted to comparative literature majors or to fourth-year students. We begin with the three major philosopher-theorists of tragedy: Aristotle, Hegel, and Nietzsche. We then look at the two greatest eras of tragic drama: Ancient Athens (Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides) and Renaissance England (Marlowe, Shakespeare, and John Ford). We continue with later tragic dramatists (Schiller, Pushkin), as we examine how tragedy develops in a variety of countries. We then analyze how tragedy migrates to another medium (the novel) in George Eliot’s The Mill on the Floss. Finally we discuss Eugene O’Neill’s effort to recreate Greek tragedy in his Mourning Becomes Electra. All foreign language works are read in English translation. Requirements include a seminar presentation and a seminar paper.