1. University of Virginia
  2. Arts & Sciences

Undergraduate Course Descriptions Fall 2014

English Surveys

ENGL 1500 Masterworks of Literature: Homer and Shakespeare

330-445 TR - MAURY 115
Instructor: Mark Edmundson

This will be a course on the two greatest writers in the Western tradition, Homer and Shakespeare, geared to first year students.  We will make a close study of Homer’s majestic Iliad.   We’ll consider Achilles and Hector and their versions of the warrior ideal and try to determine what Homer thinks of the story he unfolds: does he himself have reservations about war and warriors?  If so, how does he register them? We’ll read Shakespeare then as, among other things, an heir to Homer.  (An important translation of Homer came out during Shakespeare’s lifetime.)  We’ll consider Shakespeare as a possible critic of the heroic ideal and perhaps of ideals in general. Right now, it looks as though we’ll read Othello, Hamlet, Troilus and Cressida, Henry IV and As You Like It.  We’ll read Shakespeare as a writer who helps inaugurate a worldly, anti-transcendent sensibility. 

The course will offer students a critical terminology useful in all other humanities courses and perhaps beyond.  Some quizzes and a test: probably no substantial papers unless students wish to write them.

ENGL 1550 Literature and the Professions: Money Talks

1230-145 TR - CABELL 323
Instructor: Herbert Tucker

A reader-friendly course for students who are friendly to reading even if they weren’t crazy about high-school English and have no intention of majoring in literature.  Our topic is one anybody can buy into.  We’ll be tracing the literary fortunes of money across the last half-millennium: how it’s made, amassed, and spent; how much and how little it can mean; its uncertain relation to other measures of value; its surprising proximity to that other system of symbolic exchange we call language.  Readings in drama from Shakespeare to David Mamet, and fiction from Dickens to Sinclair Lewis, with a poem here and there for good measure.  We’ll end with recent novels about money markets and corporations, and hunker down at midterm with Anthony Trollope’s blockbuster about Victorian financial meltdown, whose ominous title – The Way We Live Now – declares what, at the bottom line, this course will be all about.  Format: informal lecture (including several guest appearances by colleagues), with ample group discussion.  Assessed writing: two or three short essays, a midterm and a final.

ENGL 2010 History of European Literature 1

200-315 TR - RUFFNER G008
Instructor: Walter Jost
Cross-listed with CPLT 2010

This 4-credit course surveys European literature from its origins in Ancient Greece and Rome into the European Renaissance.  As a course in literary history, it seeks to develop an understanding of period concepts, such as Republican Rome, Medieval and Renaissance, as well as concepts of genre, such as epic, tragedy, and comedy.  Readings, sometimes in the form of selections, include: Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey, Sophocles’ Oedipus Rex and Euripides’ The Bacchae, Virgil’s Aeneid, Ariosto’s Orlando Furioso, the Inferno from Dante’s Divine Comedy, several of Montaigne’s Essays, Hamlet, and Don Quixote. All foreign language works will be read in English translation.  Requirements: three papers and a final examination.  There are two lectures and one 50-minute section meeting per week.  This course satisfies the Second Writing Requirement, and 3 hours of it can be counted toward the English major under the "literature in translation" option. Also, under the ENGL 2010 rubric, this course can be used in lieu of an ENLT course as the pre-requisite for the English major.

ENGL 3810 History of Literatures in English I, section 001

1200-1250 MW - WILSON 402
Instructor: Clare Kinney

We'll be reading examples of epic and romance, lyric poetry and drama, from the Anglo-Saxon heroic poem Beowulf to Milton's seventeenth-century epic Paradise Lost.  The past is another country: they do things differently there.  Or do they?  Be prepared for the shock of the old–and for its pleasures.  Course requirements: attendance at lecture; regular attendance at/lively participation in discussion section; three 5-6 page papers; midterm, comprehen­sive final examination. 

NOTE: This course is required for all English majors (although non-majors are welcome), & is intended to make it easier for majors to make informed decisions about what other English courses they might wish to take; it’s strongly recommended that majors and prospective majors take this course as early as possible, preferably before the other two courses in the ENGL sequence.

ENGL 3830 History of Literatures in English III, section 001

1100-1150 MW - MAURY 209
Instructors: Michael Levenson and Stephen Cushman

The final stage of the English Department's three-part sequence of literary history, ENGL 3830 will follow the fate of a long tradition as it crossed the twentieth century. The course will begin with the modernist achievement of James Joyce, William Butler Yeats, Virginia Woolf, Ernest Hemingway, William Faulkner, and T.S. Eliot. It will then widen its scope to engage important writing from Africa, India and the Caribbean, including the work of Derek Walcott, Chinua Achebe, Junot Diaz, and Arundhati Roy. ENGL 3830 attempts to reflect the rich literary legacy that our new millennium inherits.

ENGL 4998 Distinguished Majors Program

500-730 T - BRYAN 235
Instructor: Caroline Rody

A mandatory seminar for fourth-year honors candidates in English.

Introductory Seminars in Literature

ENLT 2513 Major Authors of American Literature: Fictions of Jefferson's America

1000-1050 MWF - CABELL 168
Instructor: Carol Guarnieri

In this class we will immerse ourselves in our Jeffersonian environs and our foundational national narratives. The fictions of this course’s title will include not only literary fiction but also the mythology of America’s founding as it appeared in poetry and prose, pamphlets and propaganda. We will interrogate both the geographic and generic boundaries of American literature, considering it not as an isolated national tradition but as one that grew out of a history of migration and transportation, both forced and voluntary. We will ask questions such as: What kinds of stories did the first American authors tell about the new nation? Where do we hear the voices of those whose political voices were silenced at the time? What does the literature indicate about the role of women in the early republic? How did “America” happen—and how does it continue to happen today? We’ll conclude with a look at some 21st-century American novels and explore the various ways in which America’s colonial past still haunts its social and political present. Some potential authors include Jefferson, Franklin, Crèvecœur, Thomas Paine, Susanna Rowson, Phillis Wheatley, Teju Cole, and Toni Morrison.

ENLT 2513 Major Authors of American Literature: Moby Dick

330-445 tr - CABELL 068
Instructor: Emily Ogden

Call me Ishmael.  In this class we'll lavish an entire semester on a text that richly deserves it: Herman Melville's masterpiece, Moby Dick (1851).  Officially the novel recounts a "WHALING VOYAGE BY ONE ISHMAEL," the listing the narrator imagines his life would get in divine Providence's playbill: "Grand Contested Election for the Presidency of the United States.  WHALING VOYAGE BY ONE ISHMAEL.  BLOODY BATTLE IN AFGHANISTAN." But really, this novel is about more than a whaling voyage.  It's about a whaling voyage, plus everything else you can think of: meditations on democracy and comical complaints about science; perfumes and witches' sabbaths; seabirds and dinosaur bones; treatises on the harpoon and laments for a fragile planet. The white whale speaks volumes.  We'll read a chapter or two a week, closely and with feeling.  We'll also spend a good deal of time on writing and writing workshops, with student's own papers shaping the discussion.

ENLT 2513 The American Gothic

1200-1250 MWF - GIBSON 141
Instructor: Sarah Ingle

In Love and Death in the American Novel, Leslie Fiedler claims that "of all the fiction of the West, our own is most deeply influenced by the Gothic, is almost essentially a Gothic one." But how and why did a nation founded during the Enlightenment on the principles of democracy and rationality appropriate a literary genre associated with haunted castles, blood-thirsty vampires, and brooding aristocrats? In an attempt to answer this question, this course will trace the history of Gothic literature (and TV and film) in the United States from the late 18th century to the present. Along the way, we will examine many of the standard motifs of Gothic literature, such as haunting, the uncanny, violence and madness, inheritance and decay, doubling, live burial, and the resurrection of the dead. But we will also spend a lot of time thinking about what makes the American gothic "American" and discussing some of the themes and motifs that are especially important to gothic literature in the United States. How do American Gothic texts support or challenge the myths of American culture, and how do they deal with the darker aspects of American culture, such as slavery, religious fanaticism, and inequalities of race and gender? We will read prose and poetry by authors such as Washington Irving, Poe, Hawthorne, Emily Dickinson, Charles Chesnutt, William Faulkner, Sylvia Plath, and Toni Morrison. We will also look at manifestations of the American Gothic in popular culture, including movies such as Night of the Hunter and Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter and TV shows such as True Blood, Sleepy Hollow, The Following, and Buffy the Vampire Slayer.

ENLT 2514 Modern American Authors: American Nothings

330-445 MW - CABELL 207
Instructor: Laura Goldblatt

This course investigates the figure of the unremarkable character in 20th and 21st-century U.S. letters. In contrast to the American Dreamer or the self-made individual, we will consider instead those personages that neither strive for conventional greatness nor achieve it. They are obscure, rather than failed, successful, or aspirational. While their personal narratives might resist the standard narrative of American exceptionalism—the desire for greatness as it is conventionally understood—this resistance fails to register as such. In other words, they do not present themselves as in any way exception and the novels, poems, plays, and essays that describe them respond in kind.

What are we to make of this apparent banality? What relationship does provenance have to characterization? Are certain locations more likely to produce this figure? What relationship do these tales have to failure and greatness? Through the study of poetry, prose, short stories, and graphic novels we will seek to contextualize the American nothing in the U.S. and to understand its significance to various national narratives. The course closes with a meditation upon the transformations to this character in the wake of September 11th. Readings may include Invisible ManFun HomeDeath of a Salesman, the stories of Eudora Welty and Flannery O’Connor, and Gwendolyn Brooks’ poetry.

ENLT 2514 Modern American Authors:American Environmental Literature

900-950 MWF - BRYAN 328
Instructor: Stephanie Bernhard

American writers have treated the land they inhabit with a rather dramatic range of emotional responses: awe, fear, greed, love, indifference, and protectiveness, to name a few. This course will examine classic foundational texts of American environmental writing, including Henry David Thoreau’s Walden and Ralph Waldo Emerson’s Walking, but will also venture farther afield into American literature that engages with “the environment” without necessarily glorifying it as the nineteenth-century Transcendentalists and twentieth-century conservationists sometimes do. We will read stories by Nathaniel Hawthorne and a novel by Willa Cather to consider how Americans have internalized notions of wilderness, agrarian conquest, and land stewardship. Leslie Marmon Silko and Louise Erdrich will provide Native perspectives on ownership of and relationship to American land. The course will conclude with very recent works by activist poets and writers. Two short papers (one of which may be creative rather than critical), a longer paper, and a final exam.

ENLT 2523 Studies in Poetry: How Poetry Works

500-615 MW - FAYERWEATHER 215
Instructor: Lindsay Turner

How does a poem work, and what kind of work does it do? Our investigation of this question will proceed along two lines: first, what makes a poem?  Working along the long and often tangled histories of poetic meter, form, and mode, we’ll examine some common elements of poems: images, lines, rhymes, stanzas, kinds of address, etc.  Students will be introduced to the basics of prosody and formal analysis, and may have the chance to try their hand at writing sonnets, villanelles, pantoums, and more.  Next, who makes a poem, and why?  What is the role of the poet in society, and how does poetry bear on political and social concerns?  Here again, we’ll take advantage of poetry’s long memory and deep roots—as well as work by very contemporary avant-garde poets—to think about “public” poetic modes such as elegy and ode, about questions of poetry and identity-making, and about poetry’s relationship to other types of language, including political speech.   Readings will range from anonymous Middle English to contemporary poets such as Sean Bonney and Claudia Rankine, covering as much in between as possible.

ENLT 2526 Studies in Fiction: Introduction to the Novel

200-315 MW - CABELL 211
Instructor: John O'Brien

Novels are probably the most popular form of literature, the kind of writing that we turn to for something to read at the beach as well as something to study in class. What makes the novel's pleasures so broad? In this course, we will study some great examples of the form to get a better understanding of how these books work. We will read classics like Jane Austen's Emma and Virginia Woolf's To the Lighthouse, and also contemporary novels like Italo Calvino's If on a Winter's Night a Traveler and Jennifer Egan's A Visit from the Goon Squad. Requirements: fervent, active participation, several short response papers, two longer papers, and a final examination.

ENLT 2526 Studies in Fiction: Jane Austen Jumps the Shark

1230-145 TR - BRYAN 328
Instructor: Brad Pasanek

This study of Jane Austen’s afterlife finds the Regency author on water-skis. An introduction to the major, the course aims at formal analyses of the novel, queries the concept of fiction, and presents the rudiments of literary theory. The student must be prepared to consume unpardonable adaptations of adaptations of adaptations. Common side effects may include getting sopping wet in the horse-pond, zombies, fic, and queer theory. To be sure, we will be reading Austen meticulously; our other authors closely, but more quickly and in greater bulk. Of prevailing concern will be contemporary reworkings of Austen: her screen adaptations, her commodification, and the many parodic uses to which her fictions have been put, online and off. Readings include Austen’s juvenilia, four of the six major novels, Bridget Jones’s Diary, an offering from Quirk Press, a viewing of Lost in Austen, Jo Baker’s Longbourn, and a few amateur slash efforts.

ENLT 2526 Studies in Fiction

930-1045 TR - CABELL 283
Instructor: Anna Brickhouse

ENLT 2526 Studies in Fiction: The Young Adult Novel

1200-1250 MWF - BRYAN 235
Instructor: Elizabeth Fox

This course will examine the young adult novel, considering it both as a distinct literary genre and as a product of twentieth-century American culture.  Beginning with the YA novel’s origins in 1967, we will trace the form’s critical, social, and commercial development over the course of the ensuing decades.  We will consider the major trends that have defined YA literature and the formal innovations—including the appearance of verse novels and graphic novels—that have helped to expand it.  We will also analyze the gender and class concerns that inform each novel’s publication, as well as the ways the genre grapples with adaptation and crossover potential.  These focused discussions will allow us to address larger theoretical questions: how do we define a genre?  What kind of relationship should exist between authors and readers?  What does it mean to classify a type of literature by the age of its implied audience?  Possible readings include works by S. E. Hinton, Francesca Lia Block, Walter Dean Myers, J.K. Rowling, Meg Rosoff, Vera Brosgol, Suzanne Collins, John Green, and Veronica Roth.

ENLT 2526 Studies in Fiction: Urban Novels

330-445 TR - CABELL 056
Instructor: Anastatia Curley

This course will examine the changing relationship between urban life and the novel form from the 18th century to the present. We’ll take as a starting point an understanding of the novel as a genre that records and examines the life of an individual amongst other individuals—if that’s the case, does the density and heterogeneity of urban populations mean that cities make particularly fruitful settings for novels? We’ll consider the themes and content that urban life offers to novelists as we read stories that center around vice, crime, and industrial unrest as well as ones that turn on the opportunities for chance meetings offered by crowded city streets. Further, though we’ll ask how—or whether—cities shape novel form: is there a relationship between urban space and the form of the realist novel? Does city geography structure some forms of modernist and post-modernist experimentation? Readings (to be determined) will likely include works by Teju Cole, Arthur Conan Doyle, Daniel Defoe, Charles Dickens, Elizabeth Gaskell, Edith Wharton, and Virginia Woolf.

ENLT 2530 Studies in Globalized Literature: The Globalized World

200-315 MW - CABELL 411
Instructor: Jap-Nanak Makkar

What social, political and economic changes led to the process called “globalization”? How was the institution of literature affected by these world-historic changes, and how has it responded thereafter? These two exploratory questions direct our course on the literature of globalization. Reading widely in history, political theory, sociology and philosophy, we’ll identify features that characterize the post-WWII, post-colonial world. Texts by Robertson, Giddens, Appadurai, Dirlik, Harvey, Anderson, Amin and Wallerstein provide a socio-historic framework for discussions (while also presenting incompatible perspectives on a single process). In turning to literary works by Chinua Achebe, Jamaica Kincaid, Monica Ali, J.M. Coetzee, Salman Rushdie, Arundhati Roy, Zadie Smith, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Indra Sinha and Mohammed Hanif, we explore how literature renders the process of globalization, as well as its necessary attendants (colonialism and neoimperialism, cosmopolitanism and nationalism).

This course chooses neither “world literature” nor “the global novel” as a methodological strategy. However, in discussing the relationship between representation and contemporary world, we will have opportunities to deliberate over these two methods, and ask why they are taken up for the study of contemporary literature.

Course Requirements: Participation, weekly responses (on collab), two formal papers (5 pages), one research paper (10 pages), final exam.

ENLT 2530-002 Fictions of Human Rights

1530-1645 TR - BRYAN 312
Instructor: Audrey Golden

What are human rights, and how does literature represent or invent them? In this course, we will traverse the globe through imaginative depictions of the Holocaust, South Africa under apartheid, genocide in Cambodia, and contemporary Iran. Are human rights merely legal fictions exposed as such by novels and films, or can they flourish both within and outside literature? Texts will include Gordimer’s July’s People, Orwell’s Animal Farm, Spiegelman’s Maus, Moshiri’s The Bathhouse, and stories from Rushdie's East, West.

ENLT 2547 Black Writers in America: Black Women Writers

800-915 TR - CABELL 364
Instructor:  Lisa Woolfork

This seminar uses Black women’s writings from mid-century to the present to introduce new English majors to important concepts in literary analysis. To better understand genre, themes, and assorted literary conventions, we will focus closely on a range of literary styles.  We will also consider patterns of representation established in the 1950s and watch how they develop, disintegrate, or evolve into the present day.  Do certain issues or themes remain important in Black women’s writing of the last fifty years?  How has the literature adapted in response to specific cultural or historical moments?

ENLT 2552 Women in Literature

330-445 TR - CABELL 207
Instructor: Susan Fraiman

An introduction to close reading and critical writing focused on recent works by women in a variety of genres and from a range of national contexts.  Possible works (final list still to be determined) include stories by Nigerian writer Chimamanda Adichie; a graphic narrative of growing up by American cartoonist Alison Bechdel; a film set in India directed by Mira Nair; images of the U.S. by queer photographer Catherine Opie; Moroccan feminist Fatima Mernissi’s memoir of a “harem girlhood.”  Our discussion of these texts will address basic formal issues: modes of narration; the difference between “story” and “plot”; the use of framing and other structural devices; the constraints of genre; the handling of images, tone, and diction.  Likely thematic concerns include the effects of colonialism and migration on women; explorations by women of growing up, growing old, marriage, maternity, queer sexuality, work, and creativity; ties and tensions among women across boundaries of nation, generation, race, and class; the divergent meanings of feminism for women around the world.  We will work not only on becoming attentive readers but also on learning to conceive and organize effective critical essays.  This writing intensive course (three papers totaling 20 pages) satisfies the prerequisite for the English major as well as the second-writing requirement.   There is also a final exam.

ENLT 2555 Special Topics: Becoming Your True Self: Literature and Ethics

330-445 TR - CABELL 415
Instructor: Walter Jost

It may seem odd to learn that widely-shared notions that most of us readily profess—like “freedom” and “being authentic,” “doing your own thing,” and “being your own person”—are historically pretty new.  Rousseau’s idea that man was “born free and is everywhere in chains” was a moral and political innovation largely unknown before the Romantic age.  This course is designed to introduce thoughtful readers to questions about the ethics of reading literature from the Romantics to our own time, with a particular focus on what it might mean to become an autonomous “person,” perhaps even a world-citizen (a “cosmopolitan”) in the twenty-first century.  We will study several works, among them Charles Taylor’s The Ethics of Authenticity and a variety of essays, short stories, poems, and films.  3 papers and a mid-term.

ENLT 2555 Special Topics: Exploring Middle-earth: Tolkien and the Anglo-Saxon Tradition

1100-1150 MWF - BRYAN 328
Instructor: Caitlin Hamilton

What is Middle Earth?  Before it was the site of Bilbo’s journey there and back again and Frodo’s quest to destroy a precious ring, it was middangeard: our world, according to the Anglo-Saxons.  In this course we’ll explore Middle Earth in its dual locations in the work of J.R.R. Tolkien and in the imagination and culture of Anglo-Saxon England.    We’ll read parts of Tolkien’s works (and all of The Hobbit) alongside Old English riddles, chronicles, religious and epic verse, paired with the aim of mutual illumination: so Bilbo’s encounter with Gollum will be read in the light of the Anglo-Saxon riddles of the Exeter Book; the elegiac songs woven throughout The Lord of the Rings will be compared with The Seafarer and The Wanderer; and the central conceit of The Lord of the Rings—a ring-giver gone wrong—will be set in the context of Old English material culture and the concept of the overlord as sinc-gyfan, ring-giver.  Old English works will be read in translation, although we will spend some time learning key terms and pronunciation of the original language.

ENLT 2555 Special Topics: Victorian Literature

1100-1215pm TR - CABELL 115
Instructor: Ann Mazur

"ENLT 2555: Victorian Literature" fulfills a prerequisite for the English major.  This course will develop your familiarity across all genres of Victorian literature to prepare you for subsequent English courses.  By the end of the fall, you should feel comfortable reading and writing about poetry, the novel, drama, and short stories.  While becoming more proficient at reading and writing about the details of a wide variety of texts, you will also deepen your understanding of the literature and culture of the Victorian Era (1837-1901).

Academic Writing

ENWR 1505 Academic Writing I

Section Locations Variable
Fall Semesters

Part I of the two-semester option for meeting the first writing requirement. Finding and developing topics, building academic arguments, and organizing essays and reports. Includes a tutorial at the writing center. Graded A, B, C, or NC. Students who take ENWR 1505 must subsequently take ENWR 1506 to complete the first writing requirement.

ENWR 1507 Academic Writing I - ESL

Section Locations Variable
Fall Semesters

Academic Writing I for students still developing fluency in English as a second language. Students who take ENWR 1507 must subsequently take ENWR 1508 to complete the first writing requirement.

ENWR 1510 Accelerated Academic Writing

Section Locations Variable
Fall and Spring Semesters

The single-semester option for meeting the first writing requirement. Framing and developing effective academic arguments, with an emphasis on essays and reports. Graded A, B, C, or NC. Students whose last names end in A-K must take ENWR 1510 in the fall; those with last names ending in L-Z take it in the spring.

ENWR 2520 Special Topics in Writing: Writing Digital Stories and Electronic Essays

1230-145 TR – BRYAN 310
Instructor: Patricia Sullivan

The focus of the course will be students’ writing projects. Students will produce both conventional print texts such as written narratives and personal essays, alongside more multimodal electronic texts, such as digital stories and academic web essays. Through a mix of theory, examples of digital stories and academic web texts and our own texts, we may explore questions such as: How have emerging technologies changed the genres and modes of writing in the academy? how has the concept of “voice” and “persona” in the personal essay been affected by the inclusion of images and audio in a digital story? What is the relationship between a story and a script? What does it mean to develop and pursue a research question in the age of the internet? How have hypertextual and multimodal writing options challenged the linear, logical and hierarchical structure of academic essays through the possibilities of hyperlinks and juxtaposition? In what ways are writers becoming more like designers, directors, and DJs?

 Course meets Second Writing Requirement

Creative and News Writing

ENWR 2300 Poetry Writing, section 001

630-745 MW -  BRYAN 332
Instructor: Matt McFarland

An introductory course in poetry writing, with a primary focus on creating new poems in a workshop setting. Students will study basic poetic terms and techniques and revise and arrange a series of poems for a final portfolio. The course will also have extensive outside reading and non-creative writing requirements.  While first- and second-years are the primary audience for ENWR 2300, SIS maintains two seats for third- and fourth-year students.  Enrollment procedures are detailed here: http://www.engl.virginia.edu/creativewriting-ugrads.

ENWR 2300 Poetry Writing, section 002

930-1045 TR - PAVILION VIII 108
Instructor:
Rebecca Perea-Kane

An introductory course in poetry writing, with a primary focus on creating new poems in a workshop setting. Students will study basic poetic terms and techniques and revise and arrange a series of poems for a final portfolio. The course will also have extensive outside reading and non-creative writing requirements.  While first- and second-years are the primary audience for ENWR 2300, SIS maintains two seats for third- and fourth-year students.  Enrollment procedures are detailed here: http://www.engl.virginia.edu/creativewriting-ugrads.

ENWR 2300 Poetry Writing, section 003

1200-1250 MWF - BRYAN 328
Instructor:
Teresa Kim

An introductory course in poetry writing, with a primary focus on creating new poems in a workshop setting. Students will study basic poetic terms and techniques and revise and arrange a series of poems for a final portfolio. The course will also have extensive outside reading and non-creative writing requirements.  While first- and second-years are the primary audience for ENWR 2300, SIS maintains two seats for third- and fourth-year students.  Enrollment procedures are detailed here: http://www.engl.virginia.edu/creativewriting-ugrads.

ENWR 2300 Poetry Writing, section 004

500-615 MW - CABELL 064
Instructor: Mirabella Mitchell

An introductory course in poetry writing, with a primary focus on creating new poems in a workshop setting. Students will study basic poetic terms and techniques and revise and arrange a series of poems for a final portfolio. The course will also have extensive outside reading and non-creative writing requirements.  While first- and second-years are the primary audience for ENWR 2300, SIS maintains two seats for third- and fourth-year students.  Enrollment procedures are detailed here: http://www.engl.virginia.edu/creativewriting-ugrads.

ENWR 2300 Poetry Writing, section 005

10030-1050 MWF - BRYAN 332
Instructor:
Julia Carino

An introductory course in poetry writing, with a primary focus on creating new poems in a workshop setting. Students will study basic poetic terms and techniques and revise and arrange a series of poems for a final portfolio. The course will also have extensive outside reading and non-creative writing requirements.  While first- and second-years are the primary audience for ENWR 2300, SIS maintains two seats for third- and fourth-year students.  Enrollment procedures are detailed here: http://www.engl.virginia.edu/creativewriting-ugrads.

ENWR 2600 Fiction Writing, section 001

1100-1215 TR - BRYAN 233
Instructor:  Jeb Livingood

An introductory course in fiction writing, with a primary focus on creating short stories in a workshop setting. Students will study basic narrative terms and techniques and revise several short stories for a final portfolio. The course will also have extensive outside reading and non-creative writing requirements.  While first- and second-years are the primary audience for ENWR 2600, SIS maintains two seats for third- and fourth-year students.  Enrollment procedures are detailed here: http://www.engl.virginia.edu/creativewriting-ugrads.

ENWR 2600 Fiction Writing, section 002

500-615 TR - BRYAN 330
Instructor: 
Jeremy Townley

In this intensive introduction to fiction writing, we'll develop skills to create vivid, surprising, and truthful short fiction. We’ll read about and discuss the elements of narrative craft; study numerous short stories by masters of the form; and develop our short fiction through exercises, workshops, and one-on-one conferences.

ENWR 2600 Fiction Writing, section 003

1200-11250 MWF - BRYAN 334
Instructor:  Andy Christiansen

An introductory course in fiction writing, with a primary focus on creating short stories in a workshop setting. Students will study basic narrative terms and techniques and revise several short stories for a final portfolio. The course will also have extensive outside reading and non-creative writing requirements.  While first- and second-years are the primary audience for ENWR 2600, SIS maintains two seats for third- and fourth-year students.  Enrollment procedures are detailed here: http://www.engl.virginia.edu/creativewriting-ugrads.

ENWR 2600 Fiction Writing, section 004

930-1045 TR - BRYAN 312
Instructor:  Alexander Slotnick

An introductory course in fiction writing, with a primary focus on creating short stories in a workshop setting. Students will study basic narrative terms and techniques and revise several short stories for a final portfolio. The course will also have extensive outside reading and non-creative writing requirements.  While first- and second-years are the primary audience for ENWR 2600, SIS maintains two seats for third- and fourth-year students.  Enrollment procedures are detailed here: http://www.engl.virginia.edu/creativewriting-ugrads.

ENWR 2600 Fiction Writing, section 005

630-745 MW - BRYAN 330
Instructor:  Ryan White

An introductory course in fiction writing, with a primary focus on creating short stories in a workshop setting. Students will study basic narrative terms and techniques and revise several short stories for a final portfolio. The course will also have extensive outside reading and non-creative writing requirements.  While first- and second-years are the primary audience for ENWR 2600, SIS maintains two seats for third- and fourth-year students.  Enrollment procedures are detailed here: http://www.engl.virginia.edu/creativewriting-ugrads.

ENWR 2600 Fiction Writing, section 006

1100-1150 MWF - DELL 1, 104
Instructor:  Emily Temple

An introductory course in fiction writing, with a primary focus on creating short stories in a workshop setting. Students will study basic narrative terms and techniques and revise several short stories for a final portfolio. The course will also have extensive outside reading and non-creative writing requirements.  While first- and second-years are the primary audience for ENWR 2600, SIS maintains two seats for third- and fourth-year students.  Enrollment procedures are detailed here: http://www.engl.virginia.edu/creativewriting-ugrads.

ENWR 2600 Fiction Writing, section 007

900-950 MWF - DELL 1, 104
Instructor: Michael Sears

An introductory course in fiction writing, with a primary focus on creating short stories in a workshop setting. Students will study basic narrative terms and techniques and revise several short stories for a final portfolio. The course will also have extensive outside reading and non-creative writing requirements.  While first- and second-years are the primary audience for ENWR 2600, SIS maintains two seats for third- and fourth-year students.  Enrollment procedures are detailed here: http://www.engl.virginia.edu/creativewriting-ugrads.

ENWR 2700 Newswriting, sections 001 and 002

930-145am TR and 800-915am TR - Bryan 203, both sections
Course Meets Second Writing Requirement
Both sections cross-listed with MDST 2700
Instructor: C. Brian Kelly

Development of basic writing skills, with craftsmanship the emphasis. Study, discussion and rewrite of old and new media stories. Workshop setting. Readings from texts and various other sources. Progress from short hard-news pieces through speech stories, legislative and political coverage, to use of narrative and on to features in general. Repeated writing drills. Essential to follow current events as well. Satisfies second writing requirement.

ENWR 3310 Intermediate Poetry Writing

200-430 T - BRYAN 233
Restricted to Instructor Permission
Instructor:
Gregory Orr

ENWR 3310 Intermediate Poetry Writing

100-330 W - BRYAN 312
Restricted to Instructor Permission
Instructor: Lisa Russ Spaar

This is a workshop for serious makers of poems with some prior poetry writing experience.  Admission is by instructor permission only.  Students interested in the course must submit 5 or so poems to the professor by hard copy or e-mail no later than two weeks before the commencement of the fall 2014 term.  Please accompany the poetry sample with a brief cover letter, detailing prior writing experience/coursework/instructors, and giving a good working e-mail address as well.  STUDENTS SHOULD ALSO REQUEST PERMISSION TO ENROLL THROUGH SIS.

The overarching thematic preoccupation of the course will be the poetics of childhood, childhood which Malcolm Cowley called the “landscape by which all others are reckoned and condemned.”  Easily misunderstood, revised, denied, and romanticized, childhood, American, literary, personal, iconic, fabular, haunts us with its whiff of pre-Lapsarian wonder, its primal urgencies, its partially understood experiences that must, of necessity, compel and taunt us with mythological, frightening, ecstatic, or nostalgic intensity.  Little wonder that many adult poets, exiled from their own beginnings, have been obsessed with returning to this territory, in which the nascent self attempts to make sense of and articulate the world that in turn fiercely shapes (or effaces or interrogates) the self.  In this course, we will focus our making of poems in a widely interpreted arena of what constitutes childhood – ours, others – poetically, conceptually, richly.  Rainer Maria Rilke has asserted that childhood is one of poetry’s two inexhaustible sources (the other being dreams).   Baudelaire wrote, “Genius is nothing more nor less than childhood recovered at will.”  Through a range of exercises, assignments, and examples, we will focus on notions of childhood in order to explore the ways in which children’s relationships to the world – to objects, to language, to experience – are like the poet’s:  mythic, metaphorical, fragmented, primal—and to use the matrix of childhood as a way of manipulating adult material.

ENWR 3610 Intermediate Fiction Writing, section 001

500-730 W - Contact Department
Restricted to Instructor Permission
Instructor:
Elizabeth Denton

Read short fiction.  Write your own.  Students will write two stories and revise one. Creative responses to weekly reading assignments encourage students to focus on the most fundamental aspect of the short story:  scene making.   Active classroom participation and love of reading and writing are essential.

To be considered for this class, please send a short story (up to 15 pages), no later than one week before classes begin, to me at ed3m@virginia.edu.  Attach a note telling me who and what year you are, your email address, what workshops you’ve taken and with whom, and whether you’re applying to other workshops. I will alert you through SIS a week or so before classes begin.  INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION (which means you must submit work to be considered—see above).

ENWR 3610 Intermediate Fiction Writing, section 002

330-600 T - Contact Prof. Casey
Instuctor: John Casey

A workshop for experienced writers. For admission please submit a sample of your work (15 pages or less) no later than one week before first class. Include your email and telephone #, what year at the University and your major.

Instructor's permission required.

Enrollment: 12

ENWR 4559 Literary Nonfiction Workshop

100-315 R - BRYAN 233
Instructor: Sydney Blair

We will read examples of literary nonfiction by such writers as Tom Wolfe, Virginia Woolf, Henry Allen, Jamaica Kincaid, F. Scott Fitzgerald, David Foster Wallace and Joan Didion, to name a few, as a way of discovering and defining just what “literary nonfiction” is.  Students will write short nonfiction pieces throughout the semester, as well as two longer, polished, well-crafted essays.  Topics might include the personal essay, memoir, profile piece, travel or food writing, arts writing, for example. This class will be structured along the lines of a creative writing workshop so that prior experience in such classes is useful, but not necessary.  A love of reading and writing is essential.

Anyone interested in taking this course should submit an essay/nonfiction piece, or a short story (12 pages max, hard copy preferable but email OK), at least 10 days before classes begin in August.  Please attach a note telling me who and what year you are, your email address, what workshops or related classes you’ve taken and with whom, and any other relevant information. I will do my best to maneuver my way around the SIS Permissions Section to let you know of your status a week before our first class.  INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION.

ENWR 4810 Advanced Fiction Writing

500-730 R- Contact Department
Restricted to Instructor Permission
Instructor: Elizabeth Denton

An advanced class for ambitious students who want to explore ways of crafting literary fiction. We’ll examine how writers have worked within the long story's more leisurely scope—contracting and expanding time, organizing structure, shifting among points of view, creating spaces, controlling tensions, crystalizing characters—so that you can develop skills and craft your own stories, long or short. The class will revolve around your writing and published texts that may include works of Alice Munro, Lorrie Moore, Edward P. Jones, Zadie Smith, Wells Tower, Gina Berriault, George Saunders and others.  By the end of the term, you should have either two 15 page (or so) stories or a 35 (or so) page story. 

To be considered for this class, please send a short story (up to 15 pages), no later than one week before classes begin, to me at ed3m@virginia.edu.  Attach a note telling me who and what year you are, your email address, what workshops you’ve taken and with whom, and whether you’re applying to other workshops. I will alert you through SIS a week or so before classes begin.  INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION (which means you must submit work to be considered—see above).

Poetry Writing Program

ENPW 4820 Poetry Program Poetics: Poetic Form

500-740 M - BRYAN 233
Restricted to Instructor Permission
Instructor: Stephen Cushman

This course is about the history and theory of poetic form in English from Anglo-Saxon to the present.  Topics will include the art of scanning; the nature of rhythm; types of meter; sound-patterns; stanzas; refrains; fixed forms; free verse; experimental verse.  Members of the seminar may choose to write poems, essays, or both.

ENPW 4910 Poetry Capstone

330-600 R - BRYAN 233
Restricted to Instructor Permission
Instructor: TBA

Medieval Literature

ENMD 3130 Old Icelandic Literature in Translation

200-315 TR - MAURY 113
Instructor: John Casteen

ENMD 3260 Chaucer: The Canterbury Tales

1100-1215 TR - BRYAN 328
Instructor: Elizabeth Fowler

Geoffrey Chaucer wrote one of the most influential collections of fiction ever published. This course introduces you to a selection of his vivid stories, to reading and speaking Middle English, and to writing about poetry. In class our discussions will investigate Chaucer's work with attention to topics like the power of language, the peculiarities of visual images made out of words, the role of speech and consent in social life, and the sensuality of medieval religion. No previous experience with poetry, Middle English, or Chaucer is required. This is a good course for first-years or fourth-years, and for beginners or Chaucer adepts alike.  (It’s fine to take this if you’ve already had ENMD 3260, Chaucer II.)  Occasional quizzes, two exams, and two short papers.

ENMD 4500 Advanced Studies in Medieval Literature I: Lyric Poetry

1230-145 TR - BRYAN 310
Instructor: Elizabeth Fowler
Cross-listed with ENRN 4500

So much of the most brilliant writing is brief, intricate, emotional, musical, and written between the fourteenth and seventeenth centuries in England. We’ll study lyric in English by authors such as the ubitiquous (and perhaps female) anonymous, Chaucer, Henryson, Dunbar, Skelton, Wyatt, Campion, Sidney (Mary and Philip), Spenser, Wroth, Philips, Donne, Marvell, and Herbert (erotic, devotional, elegiac, and so forth), refining our sense of what language can do in its most intense, witty, ornate, gorgeous, and sweet moments. There will be one or two written exams, a presentation, and a research paper that evolves in four stages.

ENMD 4500 Advanced Studies in Medieval Literature I: Crime Fictions

930-1045 TR - BRYAN 310
Instructor: Bruce Holsinger

Cross-listed with ENRN 4500

This seminar will explore the literature of crime in medieval and early modern England. We will read stories of murder, theft, subterfuge, and brutality, all with an eye to thinking comparatively and transhistorically about the nature of crime and its detection. Readings will include several 20th-c. works of historical crime fiction set in premodern England.

ENMD 4500 Advanced Studies in Medieval Literature I: The Gawain Poet

200-315 TR - CABELL 211
Instructor:  A.C.
Spearing

In this seminar we shall read the four poems attributed to an anonymous poet who was Chaucer’s most brilliant contemporary. Patience is a witty elaboration of the story of Jonah, including a full account of what it was really like inside the whale. In Cleanness violent episodes from the Old Testament, including the destruction of Sodom, Nebuchadnezzar’s madness, and Belshazzar’s feast, are used to explore sexual and spiritual defilement. Pearl is a dream of a visit to the other world, where a man encounters his dead daughter and learns how truly alien the realm beyond death is. Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, the most beautiful of all medieval romances, is a chivalric story of extraordinary fantasy and humour that raises intricate moral problems. We shall also read a fifth poem, Saint Erkenwald, often thought to be by the same poet: it tells of the resurrected corpse of a pagan judge. The poet’s language is difficult (but we shall use an edition that contains modern translations alongside the original texts); his technical sophistication and imaginative reach are incomparable. Requirements: an oral presentation, two papers, a final exam.

ENMD 5010 Introduction to Old English

1000-1050 MWF - MAURY 113
Instructor: Peter Baker

This course will introduce you to English language and literature from before circa AD 1100--the language of Beowulf, The Dream of the Rood, The Wanderer, and a number of other classics of medieval literature. We will begin with intensive study of the language (no prior knowledge of Old or Middle English is assumed) and the reading of simple texts. By the middle of the term we will have proceeded to more difficult prose texts and to poetry.

Assignments will include (in addition to the readings) frequent exercises, bi-weekly quizzes, a final exam, and a short final paper. This course is a prerequisite for ENMD 5200, Beowulf, to be offered spring 2015.

Renaissance Literature

ENRN 3130 The Seventeenth Century: Renaissance Journeys

330-445 MW - CABELL 066
Instructor: Stephen Hequembourg

This course is an introduction to the literature of the English Renaissance.  It covers a range of literary modes and genres, including lyric and epic poetry, drama, utopian writing, and various kinds of prose.  The course takes as its guiding thread the theme of the “journey”—which encompasses everything from the romantic quests of Spenser’s knights to the cosmic voyages of Faust, from journeys to new and exotic lands (as we see in The Tempest) to the travels of the Christian soul through the inner landscapes of Bunyan.

ENRN 3210 Shakespeare, section 001

100-150 MW - MINOR 125
Instructor: Katharine Maus

ENRN 3210 deals with the first half of Shakespeare's career as a playwright, in which he was mainly writing histories and comedies. ENRN 3220, the spring semester course, deals with the second half of Shakespeare's career, in which he was mainly writing tragedies and romances. You may take either or both courses; neither is a prerequisite for the other.

Requirements: 3 five-page papers, a final exam emphasizing material covered in lectures and sections, and regular short assignments made by section leaders. Attendance at 2 50-minute lectures and 1 50-minute discussion section per week, and active participation in the discussion section.

While ENRN 3210 does not automatically fill the Second Writing Requirement, individual students can arrange to use this course for the requirement by doing a bit of extra writing. If you are interested in this option, please contact the instructor early in the semester.

ENRN 4410 Shakespeare Seminar

100-150 MW - CABELL 183
Instructor: Katharine Maus

This seminar will focus on some of the many plays Shakespeare based on events from British and Roman history.  In these plays, most of which dramatize what we would call “regime change,” Shakespeare raises some fundamental political questions.  For instance: what forces hold a state together, and what forces pull it apart? What constitutes a legitimate government? How ought power to be distributed among members of a society, and who ought to have a voice in policymaking? What is justice and how should it be administered? If those in authority are exceeding or falling short of their mandate, what remedies are available for their underlings? Under what circumstances is it appropriate to wage war? What is the relation between public and private life?

In addition to these philosophical questions, we will think about literary and performance issues—especially about how Shakespeare goes about fashioning the materials he finds in his sources to create a compelling play.

No prior Shakespeare course is required. In comparison to the ENRN 3210-3220 sequence, the topical focus will be tighter but the reading assignments a bit heavier, including excerpts from Holinshed’s Chronicles, Thomas More’s Richard III, and Plutarch’s Lives of the Noble Romans in addition to the Shakespeare plays.  Assignments will include a 5-6 page paper due in mid-semester, a 8-10 page paper due toward the end of the semester, and perhaps a class presentation.

ENRN 4500 Advanced Studies in Renaissance Literature I: Lyric Poetry

1230-145 TR - BRYAN 310
Instructor: Elizabeth Fowler

Cross-listed with ENMD 4500

So much of the most brilliant writing is brief, intricate, emotional, musical, and written between the fourteenth and seventeenth centuries in England. We’ll study lyric in English by authors such as the ubitiquous (and perhaps female) anonymous, Chaucer, Henryson, Dunbar, Skelton, Wyatt, Campion, Sidney (Mary and Philip), Spenser, Wroth, Philips, Donne, Marvell, and Herbert (erotic, devotional, elegiac, and so forth), refining our sense of what language can do in its most intense, witty, ornate, gorgeous, and sweet moments. There will be one or two written exams, a presentation, and a research paper that evolves in four stages.

ENRN 4500 Advanced Studies in Renaissance Literature: Crime Fictions

930-1045 TR - BRYAN 310
Instructor: Bruce Holsinger

Cross-listed with ENMD 4500

This seminar will explore the literature of crime in medieval and early modern England. We will read stories of murder, theft, subterfuge, and brutality, all with an eye to thinking comparatively and transhistorically about the nature of crime and its detection. Readings will include several 20th-c. works of historical crime fiction set in premodern England.

Restoration and Eighteenth Century Literature

ENEC 3110 English Literature of the Restoration and Early Eighteenth Century

930-1045 TR - MINOR 130
Instructor: Brad Pasanek

In this course we survey English literature from 1660 to 1745 by closely and carefully reading six important texts. We focus on major authors and major genres: William Congreve will epitomize Restoration drama; Alexander Pope, Augustan poetry; John Bunyan, Daniel Defoe, and Eliza Haywood, early prose fiction; Jonathan Swift, satire. By the term’s end the student will be able to put pressure on formal elements in a text and produce a “reading” that connects the text to its historical context. He or she will also be able to explain and use terms like satire, allegory, mock epic, novel, wit, Augustan, and Restoration. — Requirements include two papers, weekly online participation in UVA Collab, a memorization assignment, and a final exam.

ENEC 3200 Eighteenth Century Women Writers

930-1045 TR - NAU 341
Instructor: Alison Hurley

During the eighteenth century, social, economic, and technological developments converged to alter the ways in which texts were produced and consumed. The result of these innovations was a new “print culture” that offered women the opportunity to step onto the public stage as professional authors for the first time. Female authors, nevertheless, remained intensely aware of their “delicate situation” within the literary public sphere. They responded to this situation by deploying a variety of authorial strategies that ingeniously combined self-promotion with self-protection in order to legitimize their appearance in print. The focus of this class will be the relationship between gender and genre, on how various literary forms popular during the eighteenth century (conduct literature, drama, poetry, the novel) implicated gender in complex ways. Class requirements include weekly reading responses (1-2 pages), frequent “pop” quizzes, two formal essays (5-7 pages), and a final exam. Our class meeting will be largely discussion based.

ENEC 4500 The Transatlantic Eighteenth Century

330-445 MW - CABELL 211
Instructor: John O'Brien

Pirates, Puritans, Quakers, revolutionaries, and sentimentalists: these are some of the characters who passed back and forth across and around the Atlantic during the long 1700s, creating a rich and exciting culture, on that is preserved for us in the period's poetry, fiction, and drama. For most of the period, what is now the United States of America was part of Great Britain, and was often thought of as a particularly distant province rather than a colony. The period is full of writers who traveled back and forth, then, physically and conceptually, between the Caribbean, the east coast of the North American mainland and the imperial center in the British Isles: Aphra Behn, Benjamin Franklin, Susanna Rowson, Thomas Paine, Olaudah Equiano, to name only some of the most prominent of many. This course will read texts that reflect and focus the transatlantic nature of eighteenth-century Anglo-American culture. Requirements: active participation, one shorter, one longer course paper, final (take-home) examination.

Nineteenth Century British Literature

ENNC 3500 Nineteenth Century Topics: The Byronic Hero

1100-1215 TR - BRYAN 235
Instructor: Jerome McGann

Cross-listed with ENAM 3500

Few modern literary myths have been more influential than The Byronic Hero.  Generated out of Lord Byron’s various poetical works, it quickly spread across America, Britain, and all of Europe, undergoing in the process various transformations.  Metamorphoses of this figure proliferate in poetry, fiction, drama, opera, film, and, most recently, graphic novels.  We will track some of the more illustrious instances, starting of course with Byron and then proceeding to works by Charles Maturin, Walter Scott, Mikhail Lermontov, Emily Brontë, Herman Melville, Lautreamont, and thence on to the twentieth-century for works including fiction by J. M. Coetzee and Cormac McCarthy.

ENNC 3500 Nineteenth Century Topics: Transatlantic Autobiography

930-1030 TR - BRYAN 328
Instructor: Herbert Tucker

Cross-listed with ENGN 3559

Prose and verse, male and female, diary and epic, black and white, truth and fiction, British and American and cosmopolitan too: everywhere the protean modern self has ventured to find itself, the genre of autobiography has been quick to follow.  This course will follow the genre, in turn, from its origins in confessional or captivity narrative, across major Romantic and Victorian developments (e.g., Wordsworth, De Quincey, E. B. Browning, Darwin) into the muttering retreats of the fin-de-siècle (Henry Adams, Gosse), and thence out to a couple of twentieth-century emigrant classics (Nabokov, E. Hoffman). If we’re good, we might even get rock-and-roll for dessert (B. Dylan, P. Smith, K. Richards). Along the way we’ll appreciate how the genre gets embroiled with some abiding, interlocking questions: Describe or narrate? Am I still now who I was back then?  How, short of dying, can I ever bring this book to a close?  Students will write at least three critical essays and have a chance to practice writing autobiography on their own.

ENNC 4500 Advanced Studies in Nineteenth Century Literature I: Austen and Brontë

930-1045 TR - BRYAN 330
Instructor: Karen Chase

"Reader, I married him." There's this, yes, but also much, much more. We'll be concerned with the life, times and (primarily) the works of these two great writers. We will examine a range of texts, from early to mature writings, paying particular attention to issues of gender, psychological pre-occupations, formal patterns, and social visions. I have high expectations for class participation: wall-flowers, prepare to bloom.  Please (re)read Pride and Prejudice over the summer as I plan to introduce you to other, less famous works, while assuming familiarity with this great novel. There will be weekly comments, one long paper and a final exam.

Modern and Contemporary Literature

ENMC 3500 Studies in Modern and Contemporary Literature: Monsters and Monstrosity

1100-1215 TR - CLARK G004
Instructor: Mrinalini Chakravorty

Literature is rife with portraits of monsters and monstrosity. From Homer's The Odyssey, and Grimm's fairytales, to Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, and Salman Rushdie's Shame, monsters challenge our everyday ideas about normality. Situated between the animal and the human, monstrous creatures are ciphers for difference that force us to consider what we regard as culturally abject or grotesque, as well as alluring. That these mythical figures continue to fascinate, even as they frighten, suggests their symbolic power in embodying both our latent desires and prohibitions. This course will explore the emergence of the monstrous aesthetic across several genres (epic, drama, novel, poetry, film), and periods (renaissance to contemporary) to probe the shifting terrains of sexual, racial, and cultural otherness that monsters represent. Along the way, we will ask critical questions that arise from the study of monstrosity. What, for instance, separates monsters from humans? How does monstrosity define our notions about beauty and ugliness, desire and disgust? Does the monster appear each time under a different guise? If so, to what extent does it reshape our sensibility about what is socially abnormal? What can monsters teach us about the hopes and apprehensions of the cultures and times to which they belong? Ultimately, we will seek to understand how and why these ferocious figures also elicit sympathy in us toward those markedly unlike ourselves. Our reading list includes works by William Shakespeare, R.L. Stevenson, Mary Shelley, Octavia Butler, and Patricia Highsmith, among others.

ENMC 3500 South Asian Diasporas: Literature and Culture of the Globee

930-1045 TR - CABELL 485
Instructor: Sandhya Shukla

This course will explore the cultural production – literature, film, music, art, critical discourses, and political projects – of South Asian migrants around the world.  We begin with the idea that diasporic processes of nationalism, citizenship, identity have made South Asian subjects.  How, where and why that occurs are important questions for this course.  Though we may be accustomed to thinking about Indians, Pakistanis, Sri Lankans, Bangladeshis, and others from the subcontinent as separate communities with enduring identities, we also ask how globalization produces exchanges and encounters that need new scripts.  Does being “in diaspora” enable a construction of the self or the group that is impossible within the confines of nation?  And might nation be understood more flexibly, perhaps, to encompass more liberating forms of imagination?  Materials over the term will illuminate local frameworks for race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality and nationality that are trans-local, with a set of reference points “outside” the specific geographies in which they are made apparent.  These might include writings by authors such as Amitav Ghosh, Salman Rushdie, Jhumpa Lahiri and V.S. Naipaul; Bollywood, Hollywood and independent films; and critical works by Gayatri Spivak, Homi Bhabha and Arjun Appadurai.  Finally, as much as we are concerned with South Asian diaspora, we will also consider questions related to African, Latino and other Asian diasporas in and through the United States, so that we might begin to produce new meanings for race, ethnicity and “America.”

ENMC 3500 Contemporary Jewish Fiction

200-315 TR - CABELL 332
Instructor: Caroline Rody

Jewish culture is unthinkable without the strong sense of the past that has shaped this people's self-understanding, inhering in its sacred texts and religious practices, and flourishing in many varieties of secular, modern cultural forms produced by Jews. A particularly rich, imaginative strain of historical consciousness is found in twentieth and twenty-first century historical fiction by Jews in Europe, the Americas, and Israel. In this course we will closely read novels and short stories that reinvent episodes in Jewish history, recent and ancient, in the effort to work out a relationship between modernity (or post-modernity) and an ancestral past, to imagine the lives of Jewish women and men in compelling times and places, and to come to grips with historical traumas endured. Several of our authors take up the difficult project of re-encountering and reframing the history of the Holocaust, and to do so, concoct startlingly fantastic, anti-realist, darkly comic literary visions. Others reimagine Jewish life in Eastern Europe, in early twentieth-century immigrant America, or in pre-State Israel, or retrace the paths of the Jews around the wide world, over centuries of their migrations. And some practice Jewish writing as rewriting, inscribing themselves in a literary web by reanimating key Jewish texts and writers of the past. A special unit will focus on a striking contemporary project of collective recovery: the reimagination of the work and life of Polish-Jewish surrealist writer (and Holocaust victim) Bruno Schulz in multiple recent texts.

Texts will probably include:

Isaac Bashevis Singer, The Slave, “The Son”

Grace Paley, “The Loudest Voice”

Alfred Kazin, “The Kitchen”

Elie Wiesel, Night

Cynthia Ozick, “The Shawl,” The Messiah of Stockholm

Art Spiegelman, Maus I, Maus II

Bruno Schulz, Street of Crocodiles

David Grossman, See Under: Love

Jonathan Safran Foer, Everything Is Illuminated, Tree of Codes

Nicole Krauss, The History of Love

Secondary texts will include critical and theoretical essays on Jewish literature, culture, and historicism. Requirements will include several one-page responses to the reading, a short and a long paper, group leading of class discussion, and a final exam.

ENMC 3800 Concepts of the Modern

500-615 MW - CABELL 107
Instructor: Stephen Arata

The period of time covered in this course is roughly 1845-1945. At the center of the course is the question: what does it mean to be “modern”? We will see what writers such as Baudelaire, Marx, Simmel, Bergson, Freud, and Pater had to say on that question.We will also look at a number of works of fiction, from the Anglo-American tradition as well as from the Continent (in English translation). Likely authors include Dostoevesky, Chekov, Kafka, Flaubert, Woolf, Joyce, Proust, Barnes, Stein, Rao. Requirements will include two essays, a midterm, and a final exam.

ENMC 3810 Modern Irish Literature

200-315 MW - BRYAN 328
Instructor: Victor Luftig

A survey of great  Irish writing from the late nineteenth century to the present, including texts by Yeats,Lady Gregory, Joyce, Heaney, and Boland, and concluding with study of a number of recent and current writers: the focus will be on consequences of Irish literature's having been understood for many years to be central to Ireland's national identity and political processes. Part of what makes the study of Irish literature exciting is that Irish poems, plays, and stories have been closely interwoven with processes and events of the kind that affect most people who live there or who are otherwise concerned about the place. At the beginning, we will study literature’s relation to the formation and development of Ireland as a nation and state.  Latter stages of the course will focus on literature’s relation to the evolving political situation in Northern Ireland, to issues of involving the representation and circumstances of Irish women, to Ireland’s sudden economic rise and fall, and to the consequent arrival (and departure) of African, Asian, and Eastern European immigrants. Two quizzes will focus on students’ familiarity with the assigned texts and with historical and contextual material; the final exam will also include an essay question or two; and there will also be two short papers, one on a manuscript poem in the Rare Books collection and the other on a selection from a just-published collection of works about Dublin.

ENMC 4500 Advanced Studies in Modern and Contemporary Literature: James Joyce

330-445 MW - CABELL 107
Instructor: Stephen Arata

As the course title indicates, we’ll spend the semester reading some works by James Joyce (1882-1941). Most of our time and attention will be devoted to Dubliners,  A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Exiles, and Ulysses, though we will dip into Joyce’s poetry as well as some of his essays and letters. (Finnegans Wake will have to wait for another occasion.) Requirements will include a substantial research project, a final exam, and a series of brief writing assignments.

ENMC 4500 Advanced Studies in Modern and Contemporary Literature: The Global Novel

200-315 TR - BRYAN 332
Instructor:
Mrinalini Chakravorty

This course will focus on representations of globalization and diaspora in the Anglophone novel. By the early 20th Century the British Empire is reputed to have extended over 85% of the globe, drawing together diverse cultural zones into the encyclopedic regime of colonial modernity. Yet this flattening of the globe due to colonialism is arguably different from the effects of globalism that have come to prominence within the postcolonial era. We will consider links between imperial modernity and postcolonial diasporas in our exploration of the connections between literary worlds and the world at large. In reading some of the seminal global novels in contemporary English literature by writers such as Rushdie, Roy, Desai, Ondaatje, Smith, Ali and others, we will debate what it means for these novels to be “global” and what the conditions of this globalized world hinge on. We will think about how diasporic cultural identities circulate in this newly globalized world, and within these novels, to suggest transformations that may come from the decline of nations, borders, and older modes of exchange. Does the emergence of a hybrid, cosmopolitan citizen of the world who belongs nowhere and everywhere simultaneously—the quintessential subject of diaspora-- suggest a different aesthetic and form unique to the global novel? How does cultural globalism reflected in literature address the more vexed conditions of economic globalization where conditions of inequity, and social difference still remain world dividing? What is the relationship between cultures of colonialism and cultures of capitalism that a lot of the new literatures of globalization attempt to capture? In answering some of these questions, we will be mindful of the ways in which the global novel negotiates commonplaces about globalism’s association with cross-cultural diffusion, the lure of world markets, new speeds of travel, networks of communication, and innovative techno-scapes. We will ask critical questions about whether the global novel paradoxically challenges the assumptions of globalization itself by representing in literary terms what has been called an ethics of counter-globalization, or alter-globalization politics. How do identifications based on racial, sexual, and cultural differences that cohered the terms of colonialism fare as power goes global, and postcolonial subjects become increasingly mobile? Aside from the primary literary texts, you will also be required to read critical materials on globalization.

ENMC 4500 Advanced Studies in Modern and Contemporary Literature:  Modern Painters and Writers

200-315 TR - BRYAN 310
Instructor: 
Jessica Feldman

When the poet and art critic Charles Baudelaire created a poetic manifesto of Modernism entitled "The Painter of Modern Life," he imagined a kind of art, a mode of  criticism, and an ideal artist which to this day illuminate efforts to make and appreciate art. Taking this document and the questions it raises as our inspiration, we'll consider a wealth of beautiful, fascinating, and disturbing works, exploring the genesis of Modernism through the interactions among painters and writers in Paris of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. We'll look at relations of many sorts across paintings and literary texts by Charles Baudelaire,  Eugene Delacroix, Paul Cézanne, Gustave Flaubert, Arthur Rimbaud, Guillaume Apollinaire, Gertrude Stein, and Pablo Picasso –as well as others more briefly as we deem them helpful.  This course does NOT require prior knowledge of either French literature or art history, although both will be welcomed and cultivated.

ENMC 4500 Advanced Studies in Modern and Contemporary Literature: Poetry in a Global Age

200-315 MW - RUFFNER 173
Instructor: Jahan Ramazani

How does poetry articulate and respond to the globalizing processes that accelerate in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries? In this seminar on modern and contemporary global poetry in English, we will explore the world in poetry and poetry in the world. The writers we will read closely range from modernist poets like Eliot, Yeats, H.D., and Claude McKay to contemporary poets of Ireland, India, Africa, Britain, and the Caribbean, such as Heaney, Walcott, Arjun Kolatkar, Karen Press, and Daljit Nagra. Among requirements are active participation; reading quizzes; your framing of discussion questions to help lead discussion; and two 8-10 page papers. Our texts will be from volumes 1 and 2 of The Norton Anthology of Modern and Contemporary Poetry, third edition, as supplemented by other poems and critical texts.

ENMC 4530 Seminar in Modern Studies

1230-145 TR - BRYAN 332
Instructor: Susan Fraiman

This course takes up recent Anglophone works by women across multiple genres and referencing a range of national contexts.  Primary texts include visual as well as literary forms.  Secondary materials will help to gloss their formal, thematic, and ideological characteristics while giving students a taste of contemporary theory in such areas as gender, queer, and postcolonial studies.  Possible works (still to be determined) include fiction by Toni Morrison, Jhumpa Lahiri, Doris Lessing, and Chimamanda Adichie; a graphic narrative by Alison Bechdel; images by photographer Catherine Opie; Fatima Mernissi’s memoir about girlhood in a Moroccan harem; and scholarship by Chinua Achebe, Edward Said, Hillary Chute, James Clifford, and Judith Halberstam.  Among our likely concerns will be the juxtaposition of verbal and visual elements in a single text; depictions of queer, raced, immigrant, and transnational subjectivities; narratives that make “truth claims” and how such claims affect the reader; representations of growing up, aging, migration, maternity, violence, marriage, creativity, diverse sexualities, and work; ties and tensions among women across boundaries of nation, generation, class, and race.  One project of the course will be to explore its own premise that “women’s texts” is a useful and meaningful category. Two papers and a final exam.

ENMC 5559 Narrating the Caribbean

330-445 MW - CABELL 268
Instructor: Njelle Hamilton

In this seminar we will use Glissant’s concept of “antillanité” or Caribbeanness as a framework to explore the form, poetics and narratives of some of the most important and innovative Caribbean novels of the past few decades. Our central question is how writers across the Caribbean — whether Haiti, Jamaica, Trinidad, Barbados or Martinique — have understood and articulated in their writings their varied and often contradictory notions of Caribbeanness. Reading novels by Austin Clarke, Patrick Chamoiseau, Maryse Condé, Dionne Brand, Junot Diaz, Marlon James, and Shani Mootoo,  alongside excerpts from seminal essays, histories and theory, we will consider a wide range of concerns and problematics that have shaped and defined Caribbean literary aesthetics: narrating an often traumatic history; the politics of language; the question of narrative form (magical realism, Caribbean sci-fi, créolité);  postcolonial, anti-colonial, and postmodern narration; the place of music, orality and folk forms in literary and novelistic narration; and narrating the hybrid and shifting identities that define the region, among others. Requirements include a blog post on each novel, a critical review, discussion-leading, and a seminar paper.

American Literature

ENAM 3240 Faulkner

Lecture:
1000-1050 MW - CABELL 032
Instructor: Stephen Railton

Discussion:
330-420 R - COCKE 101
Instructor: Stephen Railton

Discussion:
430-520 R - COCKE 101
Instructor: Stephen Railton

Our focus will be on the fictions that Faulkner set in his mythical Yoknapatawpha County, from Flags in the Dust, (Sartoris) (1929) to Intruder in the Dust (1948).  We'll meet twice a week in lecture, where one of my main emphases will be on Yoknapatawpha as a point of intersection between the Old South and the Modernist Novel.  We'll also meet once a week in the smaller discussion sessions, where it'll be up to the students in the course to decide what aspects of Faulkner's art we should talk about.  Throughout the semester we'll work on rising to the demands that Faulkner's texts place upon readers.  Climbing "Mount Faulkner" is often hard work, but the views along the way make it very much worth while.

ENAM 3450 American Short Novel

200-315 MW - CABELL 332
Instructor: Christopher Krentz

Short novels, also known as novellas or tales, offer an engrossing yet practical way to experience the rich variety of American fiction.  In this class we will read short novels from the last two centuries, covering approximately one per week.  The syllabus is still being finalized, but works may include Melville’s Benito Cereno; Jewett’s The Country of the Pointed Firs; James’ The Aspern Papers; Wharton’s Ethan Frome; Larsen’s Quicksand; Faulkner’s The Bear; Porter’s Pale Horse, Pale Rider; Roth’s Goodbye Columbus; Reed’s Yellow Back Radio Broke-Down; McLean’s A River Runs Through It; Auster’s Locked Room; DeLillo’s Pafko at the Wall; and Chang’s Hunger.  We’ll take the works on their own terms, put them into conversation with each other, and consider what they reveal about such matters as race, class, gender, ethnicity, our shifting relationship with the environment, and literary technique.    Requirements will include active participation, two papers, a midterm, and a final exam.

ENAM 3500 Studies in American Literature: The Civil Rights Movement

200-315 TR - BRYAN 328
Instructor:  Deborah McDowell

ENAM 3500 Studies in American Literature: The Bryonic Hero

1100-1215 TR - BRYAN 235
Instructor: Jerome McGann
Cross-listed with ENNC 3500

Few modern literary myths have been more influential than The Byronic Hero.  Generated out of Lord Byron’s various poetical works, it quickly spread across America, Britain, and all of Europe, undergoing in the process various transformations.  Metamorphoses of this figure proliferate in poetry, fiction, drama, opera, film, and, most recently, graphic novels.  We will track some of the more illustrious instances, starting of course with Byron and then proceeding to works by Charles Maturin, Walter Scott, Mikhail Lermontov, Emily Brontë, Herman Melville, Lautreamont, and thence on to the twentieth-century for works including fiction by J. M. Coetzee and Cormac McCarthy.

ENAM 3500 Studies in American Literature: Modern U.S. Novels

930-1045 TR - MAURY 110
Instructor: Victoria Olwell

This course examines how U.S. authors took up and transformed the genre of the novel in the first half of the twentieth century. We’ll investigate experiments in realism, naturalism, and modernism. With our eyes trained on the social and economic changes of the era, we’ll study how modern novels understood emotions, community, nationhood, and America’s place in a global network of nations and economies. Studied authors will likely include Stephen Crane, Edith Wharton, Theodore Dreiser, Frank Norris, Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Willa Cather, Nella Larsen, William Faulkner, Djuna Barnes, John Dos Passos, and Richard Wright. Course requirements include two 7-page papers, a midterm, a final, and exuberant class participation. For those who are interested, this course will be followed by a course focused on contemporary (post-1945) U.S. novels in the spring.

ENAM 3500 Studies in American Literature: Harlem Renaissance, Arts & Politics

1100-1215 TR - CABELL 485
Instructor: Marlon Ross

This course explores the 1920s Jazz Age from a multimedia perspective of the Harlem Renaissance in literature, journalism, painting, sculpture, dance, music, photography, film, and politics. We’ll consider the geopolitics not only of Harlem as a “Mecca of the New Negro” but also of Chicago, D.C., Richmond, and Lynchburg (yes, Lynchburg) as instances of places contributing to the idea of the New Negro Renaissance.  We’ll examine some of the hot debates and combustible movements of the time, including:  the Great Black Migration, art as uplift and propaganda, elite versus vernacular approaches, the Negro newspaper, Negro Wall Streets and pioneer towns, race rioting, urban sociology, the Garveyite movement, Negro bohemianism, the gendering of the Renaissance idea, queer subcultures, radical activism, and interraciality. We’ll sample a wide range of works: essays by Du Bois, Alain Locke, Alice Dunbar-Nelson, and Marcus Garvey; poetry by Georgia Douglas Johnson, James Weldon Johnson, Anne Spencer, Langston Hughes, and Claude McKay; novels by Nella Larsen and Wallace Thurman; drama by Angelina Weld Grimke and Zora Neale Hurston; art by Aaron Douglas and Augusta Savage; dancers and choreographers Katherine Dunham, the Nicholas brothers, and Josephine Baker; musicians Duke Ellington, Bessie Smith, Billie Holliday, Harry Burleigh, and Roland Hayes; photographers Addison Scurlock and James Van Der Zee; and the filmmaker Oscar Micheaux. We’ll conclude with some contemporary revisualizations of the Harlem Renaissance in fiction and film.  Assignments include several short papers, a reading journal, and a final “revisioning” project where you’ll be required to offer your own re-imagining of the New Negro era.

ENAM 3750 Sex and Sentiment

500-615 TR - CABELL 132
Instructor: Emily Ogden

"Do's and Don'ts for the Unmarried Woman" would be a fitting subtitle for many of the best-selling novels of nineteenth-century America.  The texts we study in this course point out the paths that lead to Christian virtue, matrimony, and a happy home, and warn against the transgressions—especially sex out of wedlock—that lead to prostitution and the grave.  Why do these novels matter now, when sexual morals have changed so much? Of course, they tell us something about the limitations on women's lives in an earlier period.  But they also have a lot to say about what it means, more generally, to be a human being with some freedom of choice. They ask how we know when to act on our desires, and when to refrain; they wonder how much willpower we need to get by; they ask how to make a good life when cast out in the wide, wide world. Nineteenth-century stories of women's lives are about more than what women should do with their virginity; they are about what anyone should do with his or her free will.  For anyone interested in what it means to be a modern individual, this fiction is essential reading. Course texts may include tales of sentiment like Catharine Maria Sedgwick's A New-England Tale and Maria Susanna Cummins' The Lamplighter; and narratives of scandal, sex, and seduction like Susanna Rowson's Charlotte Temple, George Thompson's City Crimes, and William Wells Brown's Clotel.

ENAM 4500 Advanced Studies in American Literature:  Major Works of Nineteenth Century American Literature

1100-1215 TR - BRYAN 312
Instructor: Mark Edmundson

This will be a class on some of the major works of literature in 19th century America.  The course will begin with Emerson who exerts an influence on almost all the consequential writers who follow him.  We’ll study those he inspires directly and positively: Thoreau and Whitman and those who recoil from him: Poe, Hawthorne, and Melville.  We’ll also probably consider some writers whose relation to Emerson is a bit less fraught: Dickinson, Douglass and James.  If all goes well, we will end with some Faulkner, maybe Sound and the Fury and pose a daunting cultural question: Who really won the Civil War?  Very short daily writing assignment, a larger paper at the end.

ENAM 4500 Advanced Studies in American Literature: American Drama

200-315 MW - BRYAN 310
Instructor: Stephen Railton

A close look at a dozen major plays from the Second World War (and specifically, Tennessee Williams' Streetcar Named Desire to the 21st century (probably Tracy Letts'  August: Osage County.  We'll consider these texts as literary works, but also as cultural productions, and discussions will include exploring the ways in which they have been theatrically produced.  Students will be expected to attend at least one live theatrical performance during the semester.  The most practical goal of the class will be to give students opportunities to rehearse reading, writing and speaking skills.  A big question that we'll carry with us into each new play on the reading list is: how can these dramas help us explore the relationship between theatrical make-believe and what we like to call "reality"? between on- and off-stage performing?

ENAM 5840 Contemporary African-American Literature: Time and African American Literature

930-1045 TR - CABELL 364
Instructor: Lisa Woolfork

This seminar uses the concept of time as a foundation for exploring selected works of contemporary African American Literature. Time is a useful representational concept in so far as it allows for a wide-ranging assessment of literary and cultural tropes. Time is a noun and a verb; it is the basis for history. It can be on our side or we can run out of it.  It can heal all wounds or it can be a wound itself. These are the types of questions that will be used as a beginning for larger and evolving conversations about the works listed below. The course is also committed to helping students develop their own research agenda through formation of a culminating seminar paper and cultivate pedagogic techniques using the discussion-leading portion.

Genre Studies

ENGN 3559 New Course in Genre Studies: Tranatlantic Autobiography

930-1045 TR - BRYAN 328
Instructor: Herbert Tucker
Cross-listed with ENNC 3550

Prose and verse, male and female, diary and epic, black and white, truth and fiction, British and American and cosmopolitan too: everywhere the protean modern self has ventured to find itself, the genre of autobiography has been quick to follow.  This course will follow the genre, in turn, from its origins in confessional or captivity narrative, across major Romantic and Victorian developments (e.g., Wordsworth, De Quincey, E. B. Browning, Darwin) into the muttering retreats of the fin-de-siècle (Henry Adams, Gosse), and thence out to a couple of twentieth-century emigrant classics (Nabokov, E. Hoffman). If we’re good, we might even get rock-and-roll for dessert (B. Dylan, P. Smith, K. Richards). Along the way we’ll appreciate how the genre gets embroiled with some abiding, interlocking questions: Describe or narrate? Am I still now who I was back then?  How, short of dying, can I ever bring this book to a close?  Students will write at least three critical essays and have a chance to practice writing autobiography on their own.

ENGN 4500 Advanced Studies in Literary Genres I: The American Short Story

1230-145 MW - Contact Department
Instructor: Sydney Blair

We will read selections of short fiction with an eye on craft – point of view, plot and character development, the significance of setting, management of time, use of dialogue, to name a few -- as they relate to the thematic concerns of the story.  We will discuss the choices the writer makes to bring his or her initial vision to life on the page, and how those decisions influence and affect the way we read the story.  Our focus will be modern American writers but we might stray into other countries and forms as we need them.  Active classroom participation and a love of reading (obviously) is a must.  Requirements: weekly response papers, brief oral presentation, final paper/project. RESTRICTED TO THIRD AND FOURTH YEARS.

English Language Studies

No undergraduate courses taught in this genre during the Fall 2014 semester.

Criticism

ENCR 4500 Advanced Studies in Literary Criticism: Race in American Places

630-900 R - BRYAN 235
Instructor: Ian Grandison

This interdisciplinary seminar focuses on built environments in America within the context of contemporary culture wars—especially as circumscribing issues of race.  We interrogate ideologies that distinguish people, placing them into social hierarchies, based on the places with which they are associated.  We consider, for example, how the seemingly innocent story of the Three Little Pigs shapes dominant assumptions about the moral attributes of people (masquerading as pigs) based on the materials and architectural styles of the houses in which they live.  In so doing we denaturalize popular assumptions that, say, straw huts or wood shacks represent the moral failing or lack of fitness of those we thus label as “primitive.”  Can such places as Charlottesville’s Downtown Mall (which we think of as belonging to “the public”) be planned and designed to welcome use by some members of the public and discourage use by others?  What does the concurrency of homelessness and homeowners’ associations in American society suggest about assumptions regarding a relationship between our right to privacy and our wealth?  We explore such issues through targeted discussion of readings; mandatory visits to places around Charlottesville; informal workshops (mainly to develop the ability to interpret maps, plans, and other graphic representations of places); and in-class presentations.  Requirements include three informal small group exercises, an individual site-visit comment paper, a mid-term and final exam, and a group research project.  The last requirement is presented in an informal symposium that represents the culmination of the semester.

ENCR 5650 Books as Physical Objects

1100-1215 MW - Contact Department
Instructor: David Vander Meulen

We know the past chiefly through artifacts that survive, and books are among the most common of these objects. Besides conveying a text, each book also contains evidence of the circumstances of its manufacture, how its producers viewed it, and how its readers might have received it.  In considering what questions to ask of these mute objects, this course might be considered the "archaeology of printing"—that is, the identification, description, and interpretation of printed artifacts surviving from the past five centuries, as well as exploration of the critical theory that lies behind such an approach to texts. With attention to production processes, including the operation of the hand press, it will investigate ways of analyzing elements such as paper, typography, illustrations, binding, and organization of the constituent sections of a book.  The course will explore how a text is inevitably affected by the material conditions of its production and how an understanding of the physical processes by which it was formed can aid historical research in a variety of disciplines, not only those that treat verbal texts but also those that deal with printed music and works of visual art.  The class will draw extensively on the holdings of the University Library's Special Collections Department, as well as on its Hinman Collator (an early version of the one at the CIA).  Open to graduate students and advanced undergraduates.

Special Topics in Literature

ENSP 3559 Sensation, the Gothic, and Theatricality in Women’s Writing: 1717 through the Fin-de-siècle

M/W 1530-1645 MW - MAURY 110
Instructor: Ann Mazur

Course Objectives: We will trace the rise and evolution of sensation, the gothic, and theatricality in women's writing from 1717 through the end of the nineteenth century.  How are the three terms of sensation, gothic, and theatricality related?  We will consider the relationship of the gothic novel and sensation novel, and pay particular attention to the role of gender in gothic conventions.  We will investigate writing as a profession for women, and the relative (un)ease with which women published in different genres.  How did the goals of women's theatre-writing transform during the period from Baillie to the suffragette movement?  Throughout the course, we will reflect on the connection between a work's reception and the perceived gender of the author.  How are gender and genre linked?  What is the relationship between reading and performing, fiction and theatre?  Along the way, we will develop our close-reading and analytical abilities through a consistent writing engagement with our texts. 
Texts will include:
Susanna Centlivre, A Bold Stroke for a Wife,
Elizabeth Robins and Florence Bell, Alan's Wife,
Ann Radcliffe, The Italian,
Jane Austen, Northanger Abbey,
Hannah Webster Foster, The Coquette,
Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre,
M. E. Braddon, Lady Audley's Secret,
and additional short stories by nineteenth-century women.

ENSP 3610 Narratives of Illness and Doctoring

330-445 TR - BRYAN 328
Instructor: Marcia Childress

The experience of illness and the practice of medicine alike are steeped in stories, narrative being a fundamental way human beings make sense of ourselves, our experiences (including illness, healing, and loss), and our world. This course inquires into the intersection of narrative, literature, and medicine, looking especially at (1) stories of individual persons, families, and physicians about illness and doctoring; (2) critical analysis of illness experience, narrative, and medicine; and (3) the growing significance of narrative in American medicine. We study narratives of many genres, styles, and voices that cover a range of illnesses/conditions and address issues in contemporary medicine and culture. Students participate in class discussion, write short response papers, propose in writing and prepare a substantial longer paper/project, and write midterm and final exams.

ENSP 4500 Advanced Studies in Special Topics in Literature II: Censorship

330-445 MW - CABELL 209
Instructor: Sylvia Chong

This course examines the social, legal, aesthetic, and theoretical issues raised by censorship of art, mass media, literature, film, and music in the U.S. While censorship is usually associated with explicit sexuality, we will also look at cases involving racial stereotyping, violence, social disorder, and religion. Our cases will center around novels, art, film, music, mass media, and other cultural phenomena, from artists such as Salman Rushdie, David Henry Hwang, James Joyce, Robert Mapplethorpe, and 2 Live Crew. We will also read Supreme Court and appellate court cases and theoretical texts by Freud, Foucault, Derrida, and Butler.

ENSP 4559 New Course in Literary Prose: Narrative Theory in Practice

330-600 M - Contact Prof. Tilghman
Instructor:  Christopher Tilghman

In this course we will investigate how fiction works with a series of weekly exercises designed to help students understand and master the insights coming out narrative theory.  The course is designed for any student, fiction writer or literature major, who wants to gain a firmer grounding of the fundamental techniques of literary prose.   Among the weekly topics will be narrative distance, levels of dialogue, levels of consciousness, focalization, embedded narration, and temporal order and frequency.

ENSP 5810 Film Aesthetics

1100-1215 TR - BRYAN 310
Restricted to 4th-Years, Graduate Students, Instructor Permission
Instructor: Walter Korte

Beginning with the proposition that there exist uniquely cinematic elements of meaning and structure, the course lays the foundation for "visual thinking" in film--a sensitivity to the aesthetic elements intrinsic to the cinema. The course examines structure, modes of expression and varieties of visual coherence in narrative film. Weekly film screenings (7:00 p.m. Sunday), informal response papers, final examination, final paper (15 pages). Texts: Braudy, Cohen Film Theory and Criticism anthology (Sixth Edition), Lehman: Defining Cinema; selected essays.

Required screenings are on Sunday evenings at 7:00.

Requirements: Regular attendance and active participation; short informal response papers; final exam and paper. The course has a weekly two hour screening session.

ENSP 5820 Advanced Special Topics in Literature

TBA
Restricted to Instructor Permission
Instructors: Michael Levenson and Claire Kinney

"The Culture of London: Past and Present" offers an interdisciplinary approach to metropolitan culture, as an historically embedded object of inquiry. Located in London, it runs for a month each year from early June to early July. Faculty members from the University direct, teach and lead the class; they are complemented by London-based specialists in architecture, art history, religious studies and contemporary politics.

Related Courses in Other Departments

CPLT 2020 History of European Literature

200-315 TR - RUFFNER G008
Instructor: Walter Jost
Cross-listed with ENGL 2010

This 4-credit course surveys European literature from its origins in Ancient Greece and Rome into the European Renaissance.  As a course in literary history, it seeks to develop an understanding of period concepts, such as Republican Rome, Medieval and Renaissance, as well as concepts of genre, such as epic, tragedy, and comedy.  Readings, sometimes in the form of selections, include: Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey, Sophocles’ Oedipus Rex and Euripides’ The Bacchae, Virgil’s Aeneid, Ariosto’s Orlando Furioso, the Inferno from Dante’s Divine Comedy, several of Montaigne’s Essays, Hamlet, and Don Quixote. All foreign language works will be read in English translation.  Requirements: three papers and a final examination.  There are two lectures and one 50-minute section meeting per week.  This course satisfies the Second Writing Requirement, and 3 hours of it can be counted toward the English major under the "literature in translation" option. Also, under the ENGL 2010 rubric, this course can be used in lieu of an ENLT course as the pre-requisite for the English major.

CPLT 3590 Topics in Comparative Literature

1230-145 TR - CABELL 332
Instructor: Benjamin Bennett

CPLT 3710 Kafka and His Doubles

1100-1215 TR - CABELL 115
Instructor: Lorna Martens