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Undergraduate Course Descriptions - Spring 2016

 - Select an Area of Study

English Surveys

Introductory Seminars in Literature

Academic Writing

Creative Writing

Poetry Writing Program

Medieval Literature

Renaissance Literature

Restoration and 18th Century Literature

19th Century British Literature

Modern and Contemporary Literature

American Literature

Genre Studies

Language Studies

Criticism

Special Topics in Literature

Related Courses in Other Departments

English Surveys

ENGL 1500 Masterworks of Literature

Section 001 - Edgar Allan Poe: TR 200-315 (Ruffner Hall G004)
Instructor: Emily Ogden

In this course we see nineteenth-century America reflected in a fun-house mirror—that is to say, we view the period through Edgar Allan Poe's work.  We remember Poe now as a writer of horror fiction and spooky verse.  But he was also a satirist, a commentator on media, a perpetrator of hoaxes, an innovator in the detective story, and an ambitious theorist of matter and the universe.  His works open out into a bizarre and tumultuous nineteenth century: a world of hot air balloons and hypnosis; of hidden treasures and unquiet graves; of talking birds and speaking beer bottles; of condemned criminals and knowing slaves. No prior experience in literature courses at the college level is presumed.

Section 002 - Sources of Shakespeare: MW 200-315 (New Cabell 411)
Instructor: John Parker

This course will explore some of Shakespeare's plays alongside the sources from which he routinely borrowed plot lines, characters, themes, and, often enough, verbatim wording, with the hope of developing a deeper understanding of terms like influence, imitation, allusion, quotation, renaissance, revival, and theft.  We will have to ask what it means, if anything, to speak of Shakespeare's originality — was this, in fact, his primary talent or was his gift for remakes?  And where do the conspiracy theories about his authorship fit into all this?

At the same time we'll need to look at our sources for Shakespeare's plays: some of the most famous — Hamlet, King Lear, Othello — exist in multiple, equally authentic versions, though they differ from one another substantially.  How do editors decide between these competing sources when they produce contemporary editions?

We'll use this double focus — on the sources Shakespeare used to write his plays and the sources editors use to establish the plays we read — as a means to investigate questions about authors and their oeuvres that saturate literary scholarship as a whole.

ENGL 2020 History of European Literature II (4 Credits)

Lecture:  TR 1230-145 (Maury 104)

Instructor: Paul Cantor

Discussion Section 102: R 500-615 (New Cabell 183)

Discussion Section 103: R 630-745 (Wilson 238)

Cross-listed with CPLT 2020

This course surveys European literature from the seventeenth century to the twentieth.  Although it builds upon work in ENGL 2010, 2020 is a self-contained course and can certainly be taken by students who have not taken 2010.  As a course in literary history, it seeks to develop an understanding of period concepts, such as “Romantic” and “modern,” as well as concepts of genre, such as “the novel.” Among the topics to be discussed are the rise of the novel, the nature of the Enlightenment, the Romantic revolution in poetry, the new role of women in literature, responses to revolution and imperialism, nihilism and modern literature, and the issue of postmodernism.  Readings include (sometimes in the form of selections) Tartuffe, Robinson Crusoe, Candide, Faust, Persuasion, Wuthering Heights, Notes from Underground, and Waiting for Godot, as well as poetry by Blake, T. S. Eliot, and Rilke and short stories by Kafka. All foreign language works will be read in English translation.  Two lectures and one section meeting per week.  Requirements:  three papers and a final examination, as well as regular attendance and participation in discussion sections.  The course fulfills the Second Writing Requirement, and  can be used in lieu of an ENLT course as the pre-requisite for the English major; under the CPLT 2020 rubric, three hours of it can be counted toward the English major under the “literature in translation” option.

ENGL 2559 Global Humanities: Global Cultural Studies

Lecture:  MW 100-150 (Clark 108)

Instructor: Michael Levenson

Discussion Section 101: W 400-450 (Chemistry 411)

Discussion Section 102: W 500-550 (Chemistry 411)

Discussion Section 103: W 600-650 (Chemistry 411)

Discussion Section 104: R 400-450 (Dell 2 102)

Discussion Section 105: R 500-550 (Dell 2 102)

Discussion Section 106: R 600-650 (Dell 2 102)

Cross-listed with GSGS 2030

Global Cultural Studies offers an interdisciplinary approach to the varying conditions of world cultures during the decades just before and after the new millennium.  Through encounters with work in a wide variety of media (including film, popular song, avant-garde art, memoir, political philosophy), the course emphasizes the recent cultural histories of North Africa and Southern Europe, China, South Asia, and the Middle East.  Important regional events – such as the place of Gandhi in present-day Indian politics, the Chinese treatment of the artist Ai Wei Wei, the use of documentary film in the Arab spring – will be placed within a network of broad global exchange.  At every stage, we consider the making of contemporary culture within the important contexts that surround it: the campaign for international human rights, the independence movements in Africa and Asia, the resurgence of religious faith around the world, the power of the dominant economic model.  Throughout the semester, students will compose regular blogs on a regional topic that reflects their interests and convictions.

ENGL 3820 History of Literatures in English II

Lecture:  MW 1100-1150 (Wilson 402)
Instructor: Michael Levenson & Stephen Cushman

The history of literature from Romanticism to the present. The course is a study in landmark literary events, including the poetic revolution at the beginning of the nineteenth century, the ascendancy of the novel in the Victorian age, the audacious experiments of Modernism and Postmodernism, and the complex conditions of literature today. The course is also an encounter with radiant individual texts by authors such as Keats, Dickens, Dickinson, Woolf, Faulkner, Plath and Roy. We approach these works as indispensable elements of cultural memory, keenly aware of our own position within a global and digital age.  English majors, possible English majors, and non-English majors all warmly welcome.

Discussion Sections

Section 101:  R 330-445 (Wilson 214) - Caleb Agnew

Section 102:  W 500-615 (Wilson 214) - Sophie Abramowitz

Section 103:  W 500-615 (Bryan 328) - Alyssa Collins

Section 104:  R 500-615 (Wilson 214) - Anuj Kapoor

Section 105:  R 500-615 (New Cabell 364) - Kirsten Andersen

Section 106:  R 700-815 (Bryan 235) - Kirsten Andersen

Section 107:  W 500-615 (Nau 341) - Thomas Berenato

Section 108:  R 1100-1215 (Bryan 235) - Claire Eager

Section 109:  W 330-445 (Astronomy Building 265) - Kelli Shermeyer

Section 110:  W 330-445 (Bryan 328) - Eva Latterner

Section 111:  F 800-915 (Bryan 235) - Lindsay O'Connor

Section 112:  R 330-445 (Astronomy Building 265) - Lara Musser

Section 113: W 630-745 (Nau 341) - Thomas Berenato

Section 114: F 1200-115 (Pavilion VIII B002) - Lindsay O'Connor

Section 115: W 200-315 (Bryan 334) - Grace Vasington

 

ENGL 4999 Distinguished Majors Program

Time/Location TBA
Instructor: Karen Chase Levenson

Directed research leading to completion of an extended essay to be submitted to the Honors Committee. Both courses are required of honors candidates. Graded on a year-long basis.  For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/undergraduate/distinguishedmajors.

Introductory Seminars in Literature

ENLT 2100 Introduction to Literary Studies

Section 002: MWF 900-950 (Bryan 310)
Instructor: Kiera Allison

Introduces students to some fundamental skills in critical thinking and critical writing about literary texts.  The course is organized along interactive and participatory lines.

ENLT 2513 Major Authors of American Literature

Topic:  "Crossings: Race and Trans-Atlantic American Literature"

MWF 1000-1050 (New Cabell 309)
Instructor: Sarah Ingle

This course will explore American literature from a trans-Atlantic perspective, focusing on "crossings" both literal and metaphorical. We will examine how works of American literature both reflect and respond to the construction and the permeability of racial and national boundaries. Assigned readings will include texts by authors such as Olaudah Equiano, Thomas Jefferson, Edgar Allan Poe, Herman Melville, Frederick Douglass, Pauline Hopkins, Claude McKay, Langston Hughes, James Baldwin, Derek Walcott, Barbara Kingsolver, Caryl Phillips, and Edwidge Danticat. Students are encouraged to take advantage of the fact that Caryl Phillips will be at UVA in April as the Kapnick Distinguished Writer-in-Residence by attending his readings and lectures on campus. Our discussions will explore how the texts on our syllabus interrogate concepts such as race, ethnicity, culture, gender, and citizenship and how they represent the complex web of history, memory, and myth that ties them to the past. Class requirements include three essays, weekly email responses, an oral presentation, a final exam, and active participation in class discussions.
 

ENLT 2523 Studies in Poetry

Section 001: T 430-700 (Bryan 233)
Instructor: Paul Guest
 
Examines the poetic techniques and conventions of imagery and verse that poets have used across the centuries. Exercises in scansion, close reading, and framing arguments about poetry.
 
Section 002 - Introduction to Poetry
MW 330-445 (Bryan 312)
Instructor: Sarah Smith
 
This is a cross-period course in which students will read a wide range of poems written in English. By reading widely and considering various poetic forms and conventions, we will ultimately ask, "What is poetry?" and "How does it work?" Students will find the reading load to be light, but will be asked to spend a considerable amount of time reading, re-reading, and thinking about the poems assigned. This class will be helpful for students considering majoring in English or any student who wants to become a better reader and critical thinker. 
 
Section 003 - Introduction to Poetry
TR 1230-145 (Bryan 310)
Instructor: Katie Bray

ENLT 2526 Studies in Fiction

Section 001 - Novels By Which to Live

TR 1230-145 (Bryan 330)
Instructor: Karen Chase Levenson

The premise of this course is that part of the pleasure we look for when reading lies in thinking about some of the more profound questions about life: where do I find purpose; what are worthy ambitions; how does one find or follow a vocation; what is the relation between truth and belief; what is a meaningful life; what is an ethical life? We will read four great (and lengthy) novels, each of which poses and struggleswith these (and similar) questions. There is no didactic intent here: the spirit is philosophical investigation and the method is literary analysis. The novels are:  Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina, Dostoevsky’s The Brothers Karamazov, Dickens’s Little Dorrit, and Eliot’s Daniel Deronda.

You will write weekly responses in addition to one short and one long essay. There will also be reading quizzes and a final exam.

Section 002 - Science Fiction

TR 1230-145 (Bryan 334)
Instructor: Patricia Sullivan

Section 003 - Medical Narratives

TR 930-1045 (Bryan 332)
Instructor: Anna Brickhouse

Section 004 - Devil in English Literature

MWR 1100-1150 (New Cabell 068)
Instructor: Britta Rowe

Section 005 - Short Novels

MWF 1000-1050 (New Cabell 232)
Instructor: Stephen Railton

We'll read 10-11 short novels (novellas) in order to explore together the work of the work of art: how fiction reconstructs reality into a story that can give readers a way to apprehend themselves and their lives.  Authors to be studied include Dickens, Dostoyevsky, James, Conrad, Crane, Chopin, Hemingway, Mann and Salinger.

Section 006 - Science Fictions of the Nineteenth Century

MWF 1200-1250 (Bryan 330)
Instructor: Amy Boyd

This course considers the interface between emerging scientific fields and literary writing in the British nineteenth century.  Authors covered will likely include Mary Wollstonecraft-Shelley, H. G. Wells, Charles Kingsley, Arthur Conan Doyle, and George Eliot, as well as excerpts from contemporaneous nonfiction science works. We will investigate the ways fiction authors deploy the language of science to make claims for literature's truth and utility and to stage social critiques. We will also consider scientific writers’ use of literary techniques.

Section 007 - The Novel and the City
MWF 900-950 (Bryan 312)
Instructor: Jennifer Reed

“[T]he city and the urban environment represent [humanity’s] most consistent and, on the whole, [its] most successful attempt to remake the world [it] lives in more after [its] heart’s desire. But if the city is the world which [humans] created, it is the world in which [they are] henceforth condemned to live.”                                                                                                                         Robert E. Park, “The City as Social Laboratory” (1929)

The rise of the novel and the rise of the modern city go hand in hand. In this course we will inquire into the nature of the relationship between these two modern forms of world-making. As a starting point we’ll take an understanding of the novel as a genre that records and examines the life of an individual amongst other individuals. Does the concentration and diversity of persons in the metropolis lend itself to the setting for, and perhaps even to the rise of the novel? We’ll think about the particular potentials afforded by the urban setting – flâneurs and chance meetings, social wholes and new class relations – as well as the novelist’s opportunities to present the large urban canvas – whether from the God’s-eye-view above, or the fragmentary city as experienced at street level. We’ll also think about cities and novels as forms that have shaped one another. How does the city allow the novelist to think about social life in new ways, and in return, what does the novel offer the city by way of forms, rhythms, and networks?

Section 008 -  Ghost Stories and Spectral Tales
TR 1100-1215 (Bryan 332)
Instructor: Charles Sligh
 
There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio,
Than are dreamt of in your philosophy.
-- Hamlet 1.5
 
This course will offer a semester-long engagement with Ghost Stories, Spectral Tales, and Weird Fiction.
 
Ghosts--as Prince Hamlet observes--are disruptive, insurgent agents. Ghosts play havoc with our most cherished assumptions about the world, overturning our preferences for seeing the universe as a familiar, neatly organized, rational, and "realistic" place. Ghosts mess with our temporal and spiritual comfort zones. Immune to the talismans of modernity and unimpressed by the sceptic's "Bah! Humbug!", ghosts haunt us because their existence badly compromises our assumption that the Past is something different and remote from the Present, that the Dead should stay Dead, and that Forgotten Deeds are safely buried and forgotten.
 
In our reading, we'll be exploring works written by some of the acknowledged masters of the Ghost Story form, including selections from Walter Scott, Charles Dickens, Edward Bulwer-Lytton, Elizabeth Gaskell, E. Nesbit, Sheridan Le Fanu, M. R. James, Henry James, and Walter de la Mare. Classic stories--such as "A Christmas Carol" (1843), The Turn of the Screw (1898), and "'Oh, Whistle, and I'll Come to You, My Lad'" (1903)--will loom large, juxtaposed with other, less-familiar nightly entertainments.
 
We'll also take time to consider the Spectral Tale's indebtedness to Bogey Ballads, both traditional (Child, Scott) and literary (Keats, Coleridge, Poe, Rossetti, Hardy, Kipling, &c.). Finally, we'll try to chart the rise of the Weird Tale from within the longer tradition of supernatural fiction, reading works by Lovecraft and a number of 20th- and 21st-century writers.

Required titles may include:

• Sheridan Le Fanu, In a Glass Darkly (1872)

• R. W. Chambers, The King in Yellow (1895) 

• M. R. James, Ghost Stories of an Antiquary (1904) 

• Charles Williams, All Hallows' Eve (1945) 

• Shirley Jackson, The Haunting of Hill House (1959)

• Thomas Ligotti, Songs of a Dead Dreamer / Grimscribe (1985/1991) 

Course requirements will include two short reports and a final essay.

ENLT 2530 Studies in Global Literature

Section 001 - "Globalization & World Literature"

TR 1100-1215 (Bryan 330)
Instructor: Anuj Kapoor

What makes a work of art “global”?  How do fiction and film shape the way we understand the world in a manner different than maps or other discourses surrounding globalization?  What are we “seeing” when we read literature or watch a film about places we've never been or people we've never met?  In this course we will explore the theme of globalization in a body of comparative fiction and film from across the world with an emphasis on works from and about the Global South (or what is also referred to as the “developing world”).  While we will familiarize ourselves with some introductory concepts and debates within the fields of global and postcolonial studies, as well as the historical and geopolitical contexts of the texts we examine, our primary focus will be on how these works represent and re-envision the historical, geographical, and cultural borders that shape our understanding of globalization.  We will examine the narrative and aesthetic dilemmas these works share when it comes to addressing a variety of topics such as: slavery and the global color lines; colonialism and imperialism (past and present); travel and tourism; global development and dispossession; migration, exile, and diasporic consciousness; war and terror; human rights and global ethics; and, finally, how modes of social exclusion, belonging, and coexistence are constructed, negotiated, and reconfigured within and across global borders of all kinds.  All in all, our goals in this class are to read texts closely, develop a critical vocabulary to discuss them, and to learn how to write persuasively, through blogs and papers, about them.  Readings may include works by, among others, Aphra Behn and Jamaica Kincaid; Daniel Defoe and JM Coetzee, Joseph Conrad and Ousmane Sembène; Paul Bowles and Laila Lalami.

ENLT 2550 Shakespeare

Section 001: Shakespeare and the Shapes of Creation

TR 930-1045 (Bryan 312)
Instructor: Daniel Kinney

Reading one play a week, we will survey the shapes of Shakespearean creation and the way they reshape and reflect on Creation as given and preached, on shared meanings as studied and lived. How important are genres and source-texts for filtering and framing Shakespeare's own understandings? How does Shakespeare the poet and playwright position his worlds in relation to outside reality?  Class requirements: Lively participation including occasional email responses, one short and one longer essay, and a final exam.

Section 002: War and Memory in Shakespeare's Plays

TR 930-1045 (New Cabell 027)
Instructor: Claire Eager

“Can this cockpit hold the vasty fields of France?”  In this class we’ll examine how Shakespeare’s plays answer this question (from the Prologue of Henry V) of how to represent wars—historical, legendary, and fictional—in the theaters of Elizabethan and Jacobean England.  We’ll consider both the staging and the remembering of wars across a variety of Shakespearean genres, including English and Roman histories, such as Henry V and Antony and Cleopatra; near-mythic tragedies like King Lear and Hamlet; as well as All’s Well that Ends Well, a problem play with a contemporary setting, and Cymbeline, a romance that combines and reinvents many of the above categories.  Some of the questions we’ll consider:  How do leaders present war to their friends and their subjects, and how do those audiences respond and remember?  How and why do current fighters recall past conflicts?  How does war appear in different genres, and how does it transform characters and situations?  Does it matter that Shakespeare’s England was experiencing a time of relative peace compared to its immediate past and future?  Throughout the course we will use techniques of close reading and analytical writing to investigate these questions and others that arise.

Section 003 - Introduction to Shakespeare

TR 930-1045 (Bryan 334)
Instructor: Matthew Davis

This course will provide an introduction to Shakespeare for students with little or no previous exposure to the Bard. We will begin by reading Gary Blackwood’s Shakespeare Stealer, a work of historical fiction, written for young readers, which provides a very accessible and surprisingly accurate introduction to the world of Elizabethan London and Shakespeare’s acting company. After this introduction, we will read six Shakespeare plays -- two tragedies (probably Hamlet and Macbeth), two comedies (probably Measure for Measure and The Tempest), and two histories (probably Henry IV, Part I and Henry V). We will go to see three of these six plays performed live at the American Shakespeare Center in Staunton. In addition to textbook expenses, students should be prepared to pay for theater tickets and chartered bus transportation to and from Staunton -- probably about $250 total for three field trips. Note also that the field trips (each about 5 hours in duration) will be in the evenings, and at least one is likely to be on a Friday or Saturday night.

ENLT 2555 Special Topics

Section 001 - Becoming Your True Self

TR 200-315 (Bryan 334)
Instructor: Walter Jost

Section 002 - The Beastiary

MWF 1000-1050 (New Cabell 485)
Instructor: Elizabeth Sutherland

Section 003 - King Arthur in Time

MWF 900-950 (Maury 110)
Instructor: Paul Broyles

The Sword in the Stone, Lancelot and Guinevere, Excalibur. From children's storybooks to hit films, from fantasy to international politics, from medieval romance to the American novel, King Arthur has been one of fiction’s most enduringly popular heroes since exploding onto the European literary scene in a twelfth-century “history.” What gives Arthur his long-lasting appeal? What value have artists found in his story across a millennium, and how have they reshaped it to meet the needs of their own times? What do history and fantasy have in common? How can Arthurian literature speak to the problems of our own era? To answer these questions and others, we will pay close attention to how our texts express their ideas: the structures, language, and techniques they employ to create feelings and meanings. As we explore the evolving Arthurian tradition, we will pay particular attention to issues like the roles of women, sexual violence, perceptions of the past, magic and the fantastic, and ethics and behavior. Our readings will cross genres (poems, plays, romances, novels, film, and more) and centuries, including a medieval romance by Chrétien de Troyes, Malory’s Le Morte Darthur, the Renaissance drama The Misfortunes of Arthur by Thomas Hughes, Mark Twain’s A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court, and Marion Zimmer Bradley's feminist fantasy The Mists of Avalon. Writing assignments in multiple modes will focus on developing skills of literary analysis; other requirements include an exam and regular contributions (in person and in writing) to our class discussions.

Section 004 - Victorian Afterlives

MWF 1100-1150 (Bryan 332)
Instructor: Heather Kiser

Our cultural obsession with the nineteenth century is often manifested in a desire to remodel the Victorian past to fit our postmodern present. Characters like Sherlock Holmes and Dracula are continually reinvented in everything from graphic novels to video games, adaptions of Victorian novels abound, and the retro-futuristic world of Steampunk even has its own reality show. Why is contemporary culture so fascinated with reworking Victorian texts? What do these nostalgic revisions tell us about our own position in history? This course will interrogate these questions by investigating how contemporary texts seek to create self-awareness in the present by recreating the past. We will examine a range of classic nineteenth-century source materials alongside a variety of postmodern works, including both literary texts (such as novels, poetry, and prose) and media (such as films, television shows, and graphic novels). Our discussion will center on how Neo-Victorianism reimagines the relevance of the Victorians on topics such as gender, race, class, childhood, industrialization, and imperialism in our own century. We will pay close attention to the formal structures these texts use to create meaning, and intensive practice will given in the critical reading, writing, and thinking skills necessary for further study in English as a discipline.

Academic and NewsWriting

ENWR 1505 Writing and Critical Inquiry: Stretch I

Section Locations Variable
Fall Semesters

The first half of the "stretch" (two-semester) option for meeting the First Writing Requirement—intended to be taken during the first semester of study—this course approaches writing as a way of generating, representing, and reflecting on critical inquiry. Graded A, B, C, or NC.  Students who take ENWR 1505 must subsequently take ENWR 1506 to complete the First Writing Requirement.

ENWR 1506 Writing and Critical Inquiry: Stretch II

Section Locations Variable
Spring Semesters

The second half of the "stretch" (two-semester) option for meeting the First Writing Requirement—intended to be taken during the second semester of study—this course approaches writing as a way of generating, representing, and reflecting on critical inquiry. Graded A, B, C, or NC.  Students who take ENWR 1506 should have taken ENWR 1505 in the prior semester to complete the First Writing Requirement.

ENWR 1507 Writing and Critical Inquiry: Stretch I for Multilingual Writers

Section Locations Variable
Fall Semesters

The first half of the "stretch" (two-semester) option for students still developing competency at writing in English, this course approaches writing as a way of generating, representing, and reflecting on critical inquiry. Intended to be taken during the first semester of study; graded A, B, C, or NC.  Students who take ENWR 1507 must subsequently take ENWR 1508 to complete the First Writing Requirement.

ENWR 1508 Writing and Critical Inquiry: Stretch II for Multilingual Writers

Section Locations Variable
Spring Semesters

The second half of the "stretch" (two-semester) option for students still developing competency at writing in English, this course approaches writing as a way of generating, representing, and reflecting on critical inquiry. Intended to be taken during the second semester of study; graded A, B, C, or NC.  Students who take ENWR 1508 should have taken ENWR 1507 in the prior semester to complete the First Writing Requirement.

ENWR 1510 Writing and Critical Inquiry

Section Locations Variable
Fall and Spring Semesters

The single-semester option for meeting the first writing requirement—intended to be taken during the first year of study—this course approaches writing as a way of generating, representing, and reflecting on critical inquiry. Graded A, B, C, or NC. Students whose last names end in A-K must take ENWR 1510 in the fall; those with last names ending in L-Z take it in the spring.

ENWR 2520 Special Topics in Writing

Section 001:  Advanced Writing Projects

TR 200-315 (Dell 1 104)
Instructor: Lindgren Johnson
Instructor Consent Required

Section 002:  Writing with Style

TR 500-615 (New Cabell 287)
Instructor: Keith Driver

Course meets Second Writing Requirement

Develops an understanding of the wide range of possible stylistic moves, their uses, and implications. We will build a rich vocabulary for describing stylistic decisions, imitate and analyze exemplary writing, and discuss each other’s writing in a workshop setting.

Section 003:  The Rhetoric of the Internet

MWF 1000-1050 (Dell 1 104)
Instructor: Devin Donovan

ENWR 2559 New Course in Academic, Professional, and Creative Writing

Section 001 - Narratives of Education

TR 330-445 (New Cabell 038)
Instructor: Kate Kostelnik

Section 002: MW 200-315 (New Cabell 038)
Instructor: Jon D'Errico

ENWR 2700 Newswriting

Section 001: TR 800-915 (Bryan 203)
Section 002: TR 930-1045 (Bryan 203)

Course Meets Second Writing Requirement
Both sections cross-listed with MDST 2700
Instructor: C. Brian Kelly

Development of basic writing skills, with craftsmanship the emphasis. Study, discussion and rewrite of old and new media stories. Workshop setting. Readings from texts and various other sources. Progress from short hard-news pieces through speech stories, legislative and political coverage, to use of narrative and on to features in general. Repeated writing drills. Essential to follow current events as well. Satisfies second writing requirement.

ENWR 3500 Topics in Advanced Academic Writing

Section 001 - Tutoring Peer Writers: TR 930-1045 (New Cabell 364)
Instructor: Patricia Sullivan

ENWR 3500 course prepares undergraduates to tutor peer writers by introducing them to theories of writing and practices of peer tutoring.  Students will read in the field of writing instruction, research primary materials (such as assignments and syllabi), observe tutors, and practice tutoring peer writers under supervised and supportive circumstances.  Successful completion of the course will allow students to apply for part-time paid peer tutoring positions in the Writing Center (pending funding, availability, and other qualifications) in future academic semesters. Students may also use this course to prepare for volunteering as writing tutors in their local communities.

Students from any major who are interested in tutoring academic writing in general and/or in specific disciplines are encouraged to take this course.

Note that students must apply to take the course by contacting the professor (Patricia Sullivan: pss8m@virginia.edu) directly for a brief application.

Section 002 - Writing about Medical Research

MWF 1200-1250 (New Cabell 038)
Instructor: Kiera Allison

ENWR 3900 Communicating with the Public

Section 001: MW 200-315 (Dell 1 104)
Instructor: Ann Mazur

The lectures cover topics in effective public communication, including the cognitive effects of sentence syntax, core principles of document design, framing arguments in public documents, and developing effective visuals and presentations. The studios allow students to master those principles in the context of projects keyed to their specific interests, background, and career plans.  Meets the second writing requirement.

Section 002: MWF 1100-1150 (New Cabell 389)
Instructor: Ann Mazur

The lectures cover topics in effective public communication, including the cognitive effects of sentence syntax, core principles of document design, framing arguments in public documents, and developing effective visuals and presentations. The studios allow students to master those principles in the context of projects keyed to their specific interests, background, and career plans.  Meets the second writing requirement.

Creative Writing

ENCW 2300 Poetry Writing

An introductory course in poetry writing, with a primary focus on creating new poems in a workshop setting. Students will study basic poetic terms and techniques and revise and arrange a series of poems for a final portfolio. The course will also have extensive outside reading and non-creative writing requirements.  While first- and second-years are the primary audience for ENCW 2300 and should register for the course using SIS, third- and fourth-year students can request to be added manually. For the add procedure (as well as other creative writing policies) see this page.

Section 001: MW 530-645 (Bryan 235)
Instructor: Veronica Kuhn

Section 003: MWF 900-950 (Bryan 330)
Instructor: Anne Pittman

Section 004: TR 500-615 (Bryan 328)
Instructor: Caitlin Neely

Section 005: MWF 1000-1050 (New Cabell 389)
Instructor: Courtney Flerlage

Section 006: TR 500-615 (New Cabell 066)
Instructor: Robert Shapiro

ENCW 2600 Fiction Writing

Section 001: TR 1100-1215 (Bryan 334)
Instructor:  Caitlin Fitzpatrick

An introductory course in fiction writing, with a primary focus on creating short stories in a workshop setting. Students will study basic narrative terms and techniques and revise several short stories for a final portfolio. The course will also have extensive outside reading and non-creative writing requirements.  While first- and second-years are the primary audience for ENCW 2600 and should register for the course using SIS, third- and fourth-year students can request to be added manually.
 
For the add procedure (as well as other creative writing policies) see this page.

Section 002: MW 600-715 (Bryan 310)
Instructor:  Justyna Pekalak

An introductory course in fiction writing, with a primary focus on creating short stories in a workshop setting. Students will study basic narrative terms and techniques and revise several short stories for a final portfolio. The course will also have extensive outside reading and non-creative writing requirements.  While first- and second-years are the primary audience for ENCW 2600 and should register for the course using SIS, third- and fourth-year students can request to be added manually.
 
For the add procedure (as well as other creative writing policies) see this page.

Section 003: TR 500-615 (Bryan 310)
Instructor:  Jeremy Townley

In this intensive introduction to fiction writing, we'll develop skills to create vivid, surprising, and truthful short fiction. We’ll read about and discuss the elements of narrative craft; study numerous short stories by masters of the form; and develop our short fiction through exercises, workshops, and one-on-one conferences. While first- and second-years are the primary audience for ENCW 2600 and should register for the course using SIS, third- and fourth-year students can request to be added manually. 

For the add procedure (as well as other creative writing policies) see this page.

Section 004: TR 930-1045 (New Cabell 291)
Instructor:  Helen Chandler

An introductory course in fiction writing, with a primary focus on creating short stories in a workshop setting. Students will study basic narrative terms and techniques and revise several short stories for a final portfolio. The course will also have extensive outside reading and non-creative writing requirements.  While first- and second-years are the primary audience for ENCW 2600 and should register for the course using SIS, third- and fourth-year students can request to be added manually.
 
For the add procedure (as well as other creative writing policies) see this page.

Section 005: TR 930-1045 (New Cabell 303)
Instructor:  Jesus De La Torre

An introductory course in fiction writing, with a primary focus on creating short stories in a workshop setting. Students will study basic narrative terms and techniques and revise several short stories for a final portfolio. The course will also have extensive outside reading and non-creative writing requirements.  While first- and second-years are the primary audience for ENCW 2600 and should register for the course using SIS, third- and fourth-year students can request to be added manually.
 
For the add procedure (as well as other creative writing policies) see this page.

Section 006: MWF 1000-1050 (New Cabell 489)
Instructor:  Jeffery Horn

An introductory course in fiction writing, with a primary focus on creating short stories in a workshop setting. Students will study basic narrative terms and techniques and revise several short stories for a final portfolio. The course will also have extensive outside reading and non-creative writing requirements.  While first- and second-years are the primary audience for ENCW 2600 and should register for the course using SIS, third- and fourth-year students can request to be added manually.
 
For the add procedure (as well as other creative writing policies) see this page.

ENCW 3310 Intermediate Poetry Writing

Section 001:  M 1130-200 (Bryan 233)
Restricted to Instructor Permission
Instructor: Gregory Orr

A weekly 2.5-hour class for students advanced beyond the level of ENCW 2300. Emphasis is on workshop of students' own poems, with focused writing exercises and written responses to relevant outside reading, as well as class discussions on issues of contemporary poetry.  Final poetry portfolio required. ADMISSION BY PERMISSION OF INSTRUCTOR ONLY.

APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS:  Sample of student work (4-5 poems) to be submitted IN A SINGLE DOCUMENT (either electronically in MS Word, or a hard paper copy) by 12:00 PM Noon on December 15, 2015, to Professor Orr's email address at gso@virginia.edu or to his English Dept faculty mailbox in 229 Bryan Hall; submissions should include a cover sheet with name, year, email address, telephone number, major, prior workshop experience, and other workshops to which you are submitting.   Every effort will be made to notify students of acceptance during the week prior to the beginning of classes, so that students may finalize their schedules in SIS.

Section 002:  T 230-500 (Dawson's Row 1)
Restricted to Instructor Permission
Instructor: Debra Nystrom

A weekly 2.5-hour class for students advanced beyond the level of ENCW 2300. Emphasis is on workshop of students' own poems, with focused writing exercises and written responses to relevant outside reading, as well as class discussions on issues of contemporary poetry.  Final poetry portfolio required. ADMISSION BY PERMISSION OF INSTRUCTOR ONLY.

APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS:  Sample of student work (4-5 poems) to be submitted IN A SINGLE DOCUMENT (either electronically in MS Word, or a hard paper copy) by 12:00 PM Noon on December 15, 2015, to Professor Nystrom’s email address at dln8u@virginia.edu or to her English Dept faculty mailbox in 229 Bryan Hall; submissions should include a cover sheet with name, year, email address, telephone number, major, prior workshop experience, and other workshops to which you are submitting.   Every effort will be made to notify students of acceptance during the week prior to the beginning of classes, so that students may finalize their schedules in SIS.

Section 003:  T 1130-200 (Bryan 233)
Restricted to Instructor Permission
Instructor: Gregory Orr

A weekly 2.5-hour class for students advanced beyond the level of ENCW 2300. Emphasis is on workshop of students' own poems, with focused writing exercises and written responses to relevant outside reading, as well as class discussions on issues of contemporary poetry.  Final poetry portfolio required. ADMISSION BY PERMISSION OF INSTRUCTOR ONLY.

APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS:  Sample of student work (4-5 poems) to be submitted IN A SINGLE DOCUMENT (either electronically in MS Word, or a hard paper copy) by 12:00 PM Noon on December 15, 2015, to Professor Orr's email address at gso@virginia.edu or to his English Dept faculty mailbox in 229 Bryan Hall; submissions should include a cover sheet with name, year, email address, telephone number, major, prior workshop experience, and other workshops to which you are submitting.   Every effort will be made to notify students of acceptance during the week prior to the beginning of classes, so that students may finalize their schedules in SIS.

ENCW 3350 Intermediate Nonfiction: Private Lives, Public Stories

R 230-500 (Bryan Hall 233)
Instructor: Paul Guest

ENCW 3350 is a workshop course in creative nonficiton.  We will read from a broad selection of works such as personal essay, memoir, nature and travel writing, criticism, and possibly other forms that fall under the umbrella of this uniquely elastic genre.  We will discuss what is meant or denoted by the term "creative nonfiction" and how writing does or does not meet these implicit goals.  As a workshop, we will focus on your writing, using published examples as templates for your own work.

ENCW 3610 Intermediate Fiction Writing

Section 001: T 500-730 (Dawson's Row 1)
Restricted to Instructor Permission
Instructor: Elizabeth Denton

Read short fiction.  Write your own.  Students will write two stories and revise one. Creative responses to weekly reading assignments encourage students to focus on the most fundamental aspect of the short story:  scene making.   Active classroom participation and love of reading and writing are essential.

To be considered for this class, please send a short story (up to 15 pages), no later than one week before classes begin, to me at ed3m@virginia.edu.  Attach a note telling me who and what year you are, your email address, what workshops you’ve taken and with whom, and whether you’re applying to other workshops. I will alert you through SIS a week or so before classes begin.  INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION (which means you must submit work to be considered—see above).

Section 002: W 200-430 (Dawson's Row 1)
Restricted to Instructor Permission
Instructor: Christopher Tilghman

Read short fiction.  Write your own.  Students will write two stories and revise one. Creative responses to weekly reading assignments encourage students to focus on the most fundamental aspect of the short story:  scene making.   Active classroom participation and love of reading and writing are essential.

To be considered for this class, please send a short story (up to 15 pages), no later than one week before classes begin, to me at ct2a@virginia.edu.  Attach a note telling me who and what year you are, your email address, what workshops you’ve taken and with whom, and whether you’re applying to other workshops. I will alert you through SIS a week or so before classes begin.

Section 003: R 230-500 (Dawson's Row 1)
Restricted to Instructor Permission
Instructor: Elizabeth Denton

Read short fiction.  Write your own.  Students will write two stories and revise one. Creative responses to weekly reading assignments encourage students to focus on the most fundamental aspect of the short story:  scene making.   Active classroom participation and love of reading and writing are essential.

To be considered for this class, please send a short story (up to 15 pages), no later than one week before classes begin, to me at jdc@virginia.edu.  Attach a note telling me who and what year you are, your email address, what workshops you’ve taken and with whom, and whether you’re applying to other workshops. I will alert you through SIS a week or so before classes begin.

ENCW 4350 Advanced Nonfiction Writing

R 1200-230 (Bryan 233)
Restricted to Instructor Permission
Instructor: Jeffery Allen

For advanced students with experience in writing literary nonfiction. Involves workshop of student work, craft discussion, and relevant reading. May be repeated with different instructor.  Contact Professor Allen at jra8w@virginia.edu for details on application process.

ENCW 4810 Advanced Fiction Writing I

R 230-500 (Dawson's Row 1)
Restricted to Instructor Permission
Instructor: John Casey

Devoted to the writing of prose fiction, especially the short story.  Student work is discussed in class and individual conferences.  Parallel reading in the work of modern novelists and short story writers is required.  For advanced students with prior experience in writing fiction.  May be repeated with different instructor.

ENCW 4830 Advanced Poetry Writing

T 200-430 (Bryan 233)
Restricted to Instructor Permission
Instructor: Rita Dove

A weekly 2.5-hour class for students advanced beyond the level of ENWR 2300. Emphasis is on workshop of students' own poems, with focused writing exercises and written responses to relevant outside reading, as well as class discussions on issues of contemporary poetry. Final poetry portfolio required. ADMISSION BY PERMISSION OF INSTRUCTOR ONLY.

Sample of student work (6-8 poems) to be submitted IN A SINGLE DOCUMENT (electronically in MS Word, and/or a paper hard copy) NO LATER THAN 12:00 PM Noon on Tuesday, December 15, 2015, to Professor Dove's email address at rfd4b@virginia.edu or to her English Dept faculty mailbox in 229 Bryan Hall; EACH SUBMISSION MUST INCLUDE a cover sheet with name, year, email address, telephone number, major, prior workshop experience, and other workshops to which you are submitting. ALSO, COVER SHEET AND ALL POEMS MUST BE SUBMITTED IN A SINGLE MS WORD DOCUMENT.

Every effort will be made to notify students one week prior to the beginning of classes in January, so students may finalize their schedules in SIS.

Poetry Writing Program

ENPW 4820 Poetry Program Seminar

Section 001: Poetry and Society

W 200-430 (Bryan 233)
Restricted to Instructor Permission
Instructor: Debra Nystrom

How are we to understand Yeats' "Out of our arguments with others we make rhetoric; out of our of our arguments with ourselves we make poetry" in relation to Stevens' "The poet's role is to help people lives their lives" or Moore's "Art which 'cuts its facets from within' can mitigate suffering, can even be an instrument of happiness... also forgiveness"?  --Or Heaney's "no poetry worth its salt is unconcerned with the world it answers for and sometimes answers to.... able and willing to offer a response, but a response in its own terms"?   What are those terms?  What is the relationship between the interiority of poetry and the society it speaks within, or to, or for?  If poetry can show us that our most private feelings are in fact common feelings, let us cross into experience beyond our own, is it meant to help us define ourselves in relation to our fellow human beings?  If the linguistic event of a poem can also be a bridge of image, sound and syntax by which we arrive at new ways of regarding human experience, how responsible are the makers of such bridges?  Can it be said-- or can it not-- that each poem is a political act?  We will read work by the above named poets and numerous others, including many poets living and writing now, to understand the multiple ways of regarding poetry's relationship to society, and to challenge ourselves to articulate our own attitudes about this relationship.

A weekly 2.5-hour seminar for advanced students in poetry writing, designed for the APPW Program.  A class presentation, two essays and a group of related poems will be required.   ADMISSION BY PERMISSION OF INSTRUCTOR ONLY:  please email me at dln8u@virginia.edu  by December 15, 2015.

ENPW 4920 Poetry Capstone

Location and Time TBA
Restricted to Instructor Permission
Instructor: Lisa Spaar

Directed poetry writing project for students in the English Department's Undergraduate Area Program in Poetry Writing, leading to completion of a manuscript of poems. Both Capstone courses are required for students in the Distinguished Majors Program.

Literary Prose

ENLP 4550 Topics in Literary Prose

"The Short Form in Fiction" - T 1200-230 (Dawson's Row 1)
Instructor: Jeffery Allen

Restricted to Instructor Permission

In an essay, the celebrated Italian writer Italo Calvino argued that the short form is the only fictional structure that can do justice to the fluid and fleeting nature of our world today.  Our course will focus on the many varieties of the modern short story form through a representative sampling of short fiction from around the globe.  As part of our reading, we will examine the subgenres of the contemporary short story, including story cycles, the novel constructed from small units, and the novel in the form of interrelated stories.  This course is designed for students in the Area Program in Literary Prose, but is open to others by permission of the instructor.  Please contact Professor Allen at jra8w@virginia.edu.

ENLP 4720 Literary Prose Thesis Course

M 100-330 (Dawson's Row 1)
Instructor: Jane Alison

This is a directed-writing course for students in the Area Program in Literary Prose, taken in their final semester. Students will continue to explore individual writers’ aesthetic concerns and various principles related to art, writing, and the creative act while working independently on a manuscript of forty to sixty polished pages. A student might choose to assemble a cycle of short stories; write a novella; compose a sequence of creative essays; or write an extended memoiristic or other nonfiction essay: each student will design his or her own project. Although working independently, students will meet each week to consider aspects of one another’s work in small groups and will consult regularly with the instructor.

Medieval Literature

ENMD 3250 - Chaucer I

TR 1100-1215 (Minor 130)
Instructor: Bruce Holsinger

Studies selected Canterbury Tales and other works, read in the original. 

ENMD/ENRN 4500 Advanced Studies in Medieval Literature I

Section 001: Medieval and Renaissance Lyric Poetry

MW 330-445 (New Cabell 411)
Instructor: John Parker

This course will survey medieval and Renaissance lyric poetry, with an emphasis on the latter.  Most of our medieval lyrics will be anonymous, but Renaissance writers should include Thomas Wyatt, Henry Howard (Earl of Surrey), Sir Philip Sidney, Mary Sidney, Christopher Marlowe, Walter Raleigh, Queen Elizabeth, William Shakespeare, Ben Jonson, John Donne, George Herbert, Robert Herrick, Andrew Marvell, and John Milton.

Section 002: Fathers and Daughters, Medieval to Early Modern

TR 200-315 (New Cabell 364)
Instructor: Anthony Spearing

In this seminar we shall explore, in some works by medieval and early modern writers, the vary-
ing forms taken by the father-daughter relationship as a nexus of conflicting attitudes and emot-
ions—authority enforced or relinquished, submission, rebellion, affection, incest pursued or avoided. Medieval texts to be studied will include a popular romance, two lives of female saints (one a transvestite and the other tortured and beheaded by her father), the dream-poem Pearl, some tales by Chaucer (including those of the Man of Law, the Physician, and the Reeve), and some treatments of father-daughter incest by Chaucer’s contemporary John Gower. Early modern texts will include the Tudor romance The Squire of Low Degree and some plays by Shakespeare (including Hamlet, King Lear, Pericles, and The Tempest). We shall also consider some folktales and fairytales, along with Jacques Demy’s delightfully odd musical film version of the fairy tale Peau d’Âne (Donkey Skin), in which a princess flees from her father’s wish to marry her.

Requirements: an oral presentation, a short paper, a long paper, a final exam.

ENMD 5010 Introduction to Old English

MWF 1000-1050 (Gibson 242)
Instructor: Peter Baker

Studies the language and literature of Anglo-Saxon England. 

Renaissance Literature

ENRN 3220 Shakespeare II

Lecture:  MW 1200-1250 (Minor 125)
Instructor: Katharine Maus

This course deals with the second half of Shakespeare's career as a playwright, in which he was mainly writing tragedies and romances.  English 3210, the fall semester course, deals with the first half of Shakespeare's career, in which he was mainly writing histories and comedies.  You may take either or both courses; neither is a prerequisite for the other.
2 50-minute lectures and 1 50-minute discussion section per week.

Requirements: 3 five-page papers, a final exam emphasizing material covered in lectures and section meetings, and regular short assignments made by section leaders.

This course does not automatically fulfill the Second Writing Requirement, but it may be tweaked to do so.  See me in the first few weeks of the semester if you are interested in this option.

 

Section 101:  R 330-420 (New Cabell 044) - Elizabeth Sutherland

Section 102:  R 600-650 (New Cabell 407) - Devan Ard

Section 103:  F 1000-1050 (Bryan  235) - Sarah Berkowitz

Section 104:  R 500-550 (New Cabell 407) - Elizabeth Sutherland

Section 105:  F 1100-1150 (Bryan 235) - Sarah Berkowitz

Section 106:  F 1000-1050 (Bryan 328) - Devan Ard

ENRN 3250 Milton

"Origins, Transgressions, Revolutions"

TR 1230-145 (New Cabell 338)
Instructor: Clare Kinney

A large part of this course will be dedicated to a careful exploration of John Milton’s enormous and embattled epic of origins, Paradise Lost, but we’ll also be examining several of his earlier poetic experiments and glancing at his political writings on censorship and divorce.  Among the issues the course will address: Milton the revolutionary (the politics and poetics of rebellion); Milton the rewriter of Scripture (inspired re-creation or Satanic supplementation?); Milton and gender (is Edenic bliss really conditional upon female secondariness?); Milton and literary history (how can we digest the poetry that tries to swallow all its predecessors?). 

Requirements: enthusiasm, stamina, regular attendance and lively participation in class discussions; a short paper on the earlier poetry; midterm examination; series of e-mail response postings on Paradise Lost; either (each student may choose) a 10-12 page paper on Paradise Lost or a very comprehensive final examination on Paradise Lost.

ENRN 4410 Shakespeare Seminar

Topic: Shakespeare in the Making

TR 200-315 (Bryan 310)
Instructor: Daniel Kinney

 Reading one play a week, we will survey a sequence of formal and thematic experiments leading up to and finally beyond the four principal tragedies of state (Hamlet, King Lear, Macbeth, Antony and Cleopatra). How do these dramas revise or reflect on the patterns of Shakespeare's first histories? How are his main generic perspectives related throughout his career? Where do borrowed providential designs first begin to give way to self-conscious authorial reshaping, and how is the tension between these two elements of plotting reflected in each of the tragedies? A few major themes to consider together or singly: succession and ordering regimens, dynastic and cosmic; misrule whether inner or outer, both festive and blighting; the state and the scene of heroic performance; apt improvisation, rehearsal, and ripeness of purpose / apt timing. Class requirements: Lively participation including occasional email responses, one short and one longer essay, and a final exam.

ENRN/ENMD 4500 Advanced Studies in Renaissance Literature

Section 001: Medieval and Renaissance Lyric Poetry

MW 330-445 (New Cabell 411)
Instructor: John Parker

This course will survey medieval and Renaissance lyric poetry, with an emphasis on the latter.  Most of our medieval lyrics will be anonymous, but Renaissance writers should include Thomas Wyatt, Henry Howard (Earl of Surrey), Sir Philip Sidney, Mary Sidney, Christopher Marlowe, Walter Raleigh, Queen Elizabeth, William Shakespeare, Ben Jonson, John Donne, George Herbert, Robert Herrick, Andrew Marvell, and John Milton.

Section 002: Fathers and Daughters, Medieval to Early Modern

TR 200-315 (New Cabell 364)
Instructor: Anthony Spearing

In this seminar we shall explore, in some works by medieval and early modern writers, the vary-
ing forms taken by the father-daughter relationship as a nexus of conflicting attitudes and emot-
ions—authority enforced or relinquished, submission, rebellion, affection, incest pursued or avoided. Medieval texts to be studied will include a popular romance, two lives of female saints (one a transvestite and the other tortured and beheaded by her father), the dream-poem Pearl, some tales by Chaucer (including those of the Man of Law, the Physician, and the Reeve), and some treatments of father-daughter incest by Chaucer’s contemporary John Gower. Early modern texts will include the Tudor romance The Squire of Low Degree and some plays by Shakespeare (including Hamlet, King Lear, Pericles, and The Tempest). We shall also consider some folktales and fairytales, along with Jacques Demy’s delightfully odd musical film version of the fairy tale Peau d’Âne (Donkey Skin), in which a princess flees from her father’s wish to marry her.

Requirements: an oral presentation, a short paper, a long paper, a final exam.

Restoration and Eighteenth Century Literature

ENEC 3200 Eighteenth-Century Women Writers

Marks and the Marketplace: Female Authorship in the Eighteenth Century

MWF 1100-1150 (Dell 2 101)
Instructor: Jennifer Reed

In 1743, Alexander Pope wrote that “Most women” were made of “Matter too soft a lasting mark to bear, / And best distinguished by black, brown or fair”. In this course we will read widely and discuss deeply a range of women’s writing of the long eighteenth century, considering the kinds of “lasting mark[s]” left by eighteenth-century female authors, and the ways in which entry into the literary marketplace “marked” them as socially, and sometimes sexually, disreputable. We’ll also look at the types of distinctions they drew in the burgeoning literary forms that their work fomented.

Taking up the challenge of recent literary scholarship on 18th-century women’s writing, and the strong revisionist interest in women’s writing of the period, the class will read across drama, conduct books, poetry, novels, and criticism written by authors as disparate as the aristocratic Lady Mary and the laboring-class poet Mary Leapor in order to think about questions such as: Where did female authors leave lasting marks on literature and society? What was at stake for women to publish their writing? What role were women readers allocated by the literary and cultural productions of the period?

ENEC 3600 The English Novel I

TR 930-1045 (Gibson 341)
Instructor: Alison Hurley

Today classes like this one elevate novels to the status of serious literature.  During the eighteenth century, however, the novel was not just a new and thus culturally illegitimate genre, it was a dangerous one as well: seductive, subversive, addictive, and unruly.  No wonder it was so popular!  But despite their reputation as merely popular and mostly valueless cultural productions, early novels grappled with serious questions about the experience of living in an increasingly secular, mobile, and literate society.  How can, and why should, a book make the everyday lives of ordinary individuals matter?  Does sympathizing with fictional characters lead to virtue or vice?  Is the "real" best represented in details or ideals?  And perhaps most fascinating of all, how can we tell "true" stories while essentially telling lies?  Wonderfully contentious conversations developed among eighteenth-century novelists about how best to answer questions such as these.  Our work will be to revive these conversations, and hopefully, come to a better understanding of how they propelled the novel towards its current status as the dominant literary genre of the modern world.

Our readings will include novels by Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Sterne, Radcliffe, and Austen.  Class requirements will include weekly reading-response papers, frequent reading quizzes, two essays, and a final exam.

ENEC 4500 Advanced Studies in Eighteenth-Century Literature I

Section 001 - English Poetry: Restoration to Revolution (1660-1789)

T 300-530 (Bryan 330)
Instructor: Michael Suarez

This class will focus on the close reading of English poetic texts from the Restoration to the French Revolution.

Nineteenth Century British Literature

ENNC 3110 English Poetry and Prose of the Nineteenth Century Romanticism

Topic: Romantic Visionaries

TR 330-445 (Bryan 235)
Instructor: Herbert Tucker

A survey of the "visionary company" within British Romanticism: six authors who, while firmly grounded in the real, regarded given realities as a platform from which to envision options that might transform the real.   Poetry by Blake, Coleridge, Shelley, and Keats; De Quincey's autobiographical Opium-Eater; Mary Shelley's novel Frankenstein.  Two papers, a midterm, and a final exam.

ENNC 3210 Major British Authors of the Early Nineteenth Century

Topic: Wordsworth, Austen, Byron

TR 930-1045 (Bryan Hall 328)
Instructor: Andrew Stauffer

An in-depth approach to three of the major authors of the Romantic era in England: William Wordsworth, Jane Austen, and Lord Byron. Extensive reading of their work and attention to their lives and cultural contexts will be the heart of this course, with an aim of better understanding both their individual creative achievements and the collective spirit of the age. Two papers, a mid-term, and a final exam.

ENNC 3600 The English Novel II

"The English Novel in the Nineteenth Century"

TR 200-315 (Bryan 235)
Instructor: Stephen Arata

“Novels are in the hands of us all,” wrote Anthony Trollope in 1870, “from the Prime Minister down to the last-appointed scullery maid. We have become a novel-reading nation.” Indeed, over the course of the nineteenth century the novel became the most popular—and profitable—literary genre in Great Britain. Its success was due to many factors, none perhaps more important than the extraordinary sophistication and emotional power with which novelists set out to portray (as the title of one of Trollope’s own novels puts it) “the way we live now.” More than ever before, novelists were committed to recording the visible world in all its abundant detail while also exploring the complex interior lives of individual women and men. They accomplished these feats, moreover, by way of gripping stories full of adventure, love (lust too), betrayal, mystery, and wonder.  In this course we will immerse ourselves in a half-dozen or so of the finest examples of the genre, chosen from among such writers as Jane Austen, Walter Scott, Charles Dickens, Charlotte Bronte, Elizabeth Gaskell, George Eliot, Mary Elizabeth Braddon, Thomas Hardy, and Trollope himself. Requirements will likely include bi-weekly email responses, two essays, a midterm, and final exam.

ENNC 4500 Advanced Studies in Nineteenth Century Literature I

Section 002 - Nineteenth Century Novels Up Close and Philosophical

TR 930-1045 (Bryan 330)
Instructor: Karen Chase Levenson

We will concentrate on four great novels of the Nineteenth Century: Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina, Dostoevsky’s The Brothers Karamazov, Dickens’s Little Dorrit, and Eliot’s Daniel Deronda. Our aim is to examine how these authors and works approach life’s big questions: meaning, purpose, vocation, ethics, pleasure. There is no didactic intent or doctrinal pursuit: our investigations are philosophical and literary. We will assume that while fictions are artificial while life is actual, there is yet a certain amount of craft and performance involved in living and (of course) even more in writing. Therefore, it is fair to analyze our own attitudes alongside those we find expressed in each novel and by each author. We study possibilities, images, metaphors and avoid searching for answers or solutions. Be prepared to write thoughtful weekly responses and a long seminar paper. There will be a few reading quizzes.

Section 003 - Just Five Poems

TR 200-315 (New Cabell 044)
Instructor: Andrew Stauffer

This class is an experiment in close, extended engagement with a very small number of literary works over an entire semester. Focusing on five distinct poems by five 19th-century British authors, we will read, copy, recite, memorize, research, examine, scan, revise, edit, and intensely care about each one for 2-3 weeks. The goal is not only deep knowledge of these individual works, but an emergent sense of 19th-century poetry more broadly seen from an inner standing point. Students will help select our five poems from a list of nominees on the first day of class.  Two papers, various unconventional in-class exercises, and a final exam.

Modern and Contemporary Literature

ENMC 3310 Major African American Poets

Section 001:  MWF 1100-1150 (Gibson 242)
Instructor: Marvin Campbell

This course will explore the category, history, and development of African-American poetry over the course of the twentieth and twenty first centuries, spanning from the Harlem Renaissance to our contemporary moment, to examine how long poems of the tradition challenge distinctions between genres and interact with the musical forms of jazz, blues, and hip-hop, as well as reflect the aesthetic, cultural, and critical legacy of African-American poetics.  We will also consider the myriad ways in which these poets have responded to the pressures of history, situating their investigations of literary form and oral traditions in the context of the emergence of "the New Negro," the Civil Rights Movement, the rise of black feminism, and the #BlackLivesMatter movement.  Authors will include: Langston Hughes, Robert Hayden, James Weldon Johnson, Audre Lorde, Gwendolyn Brooks, Claude McKay, Melvin Tolson, and Claudia Rankine. 

In addition to active class discussion, assignments will include two shorter papers, various unconventional class exercises, and a longer research paper.

ENMC 3500 Studies in Modern and Contemporary Literature

Section 001 - Contemporary Fictions

MWF 1100-1150 (New Cabell 383)
Instructor: Madigan Haley

“Contemporary” generally describes things that belong to the same time or period, during any period in history. Yet the word also strangely seems to get at the specificity of our current historical era—“the contemporary period”—when we suddenly seem to be sharing time with others (co-temporal) in unprecedented ways. This course will explore such startling simultaneity as a defining feature of 20th- and 21st-century cultural life. We will look to fiction—a category broad enough to include novels and comics, movies and Tweets—as one of the main ways we imagine ourselves in relation to others, and thus as an entryway to the meanings of our global era. The course’s three-class-per-week format will happily allow us to complement class discussions, and a research paper, with less conventional activities: library workshops; film screenings; and collaborative projects. Likely authors/filmmakers/artists include Tom McCarthy, Margaret Atwood, W. G. Sebald, Teju Cole, Zadie Smith, Joe Sacco, Ai Wei Wei, Bill Viola, Alejandro González Iñárritu, Chris Marker, and Claire Denis, among others.

Section 002 - Currents in African Literature: TR 200-315 (New Cabell 303)
Instructor: Njelle Hamilton

Combined Section with AAS 3500-001

In this course, we will read a sampling of some of the exciting new novels by Africa’s young and established writers, from countries as varied as Nigeria, Ethiopia, Sierra Leone, Ghana, and Zimbabwe. In particular, we will examine the literary innovations that women writers such as Adichie, Bulawayo, Selasie, and Mengiste use to narrate issues affecting the continent. These topics include: dictatorship; the lingering effects of colonization; the postcolonial nation state; the traumas of war and geo-politics; gender and sexuality; and migration; among others. These central questions will guide our readings: What themes, concerns, and literary strategies animate, unite, or differentiate the literature by women writers from different African countries?  How applicable are Western feminist and womanist theories to African fiction? How do sociopolitical realities inform literary expression? How can these novels help us understand the contemporary African novel within the contexts of larger historical and cultural forces, events, and movements? Assignments include a weekly African News Forum, a historical group presentation, intermittent novel reviews, and a final essay.

ENMC 3800 Concepts of the Modern—Nietzsche and Modern Literature

TR 1230-145  (Bryan 328)
Instructor: Jessica R. Feldman

In order to understand the notion of modernity during the late 19th and early 20th centuries, we’ll study the writing of Friedrich Nietzsche, a philosopher who wrote in literary  ways—dramatic, poetic, fictional.   We’ll also read works by Franz Kafka, William Butler Yeats, James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, and Vladimir Nabokov, considering them in light of Nietzsche’s methods and ideas.  Nietzsche and these writers wondered about such questions as: What is an ethical life? How does religion function?  How do we know what we know? How do people communicate with one another?  In a world filled with what we might summarize as "bad behavior," what are the roles of art and beauty? This is a lecture and discussion course, and there will be a take-home midterm, a final, and a paper.

ENMC 4500 Advanced Studies in Modern and Contemporary Literature

Section 001 - Photography and Literature

TR 330-445 (Bryan 312)
Instructor: Maurice Wallace

A study of how photography appears in literature, beginning with nineteenth-century writers such as Edgard Allen Poe and Nathaniel Hawthorne, and continuing to the present.

Section 005 - Social Media and Gender in the Global South

TR 500-615 (Gibson 341)
Instructor: Lisa Goff
Combined Section with MESA 4559-001

Western media depict women in the global south as powerless, but they are in fact architects of their own solutions to economic and social problems. This class uses the lens of social media to study these women, their critiques of power, and their strategies for change—which don’t always conform to western ideas of feminism. As a final project, each students will produce a video about a social media producer in the Middle East, South Asia, or North Africa. Readings include theory, journalism, non-fiction. The course will also interrogate the meaning of "Global South," which scholars use to describe our socio-economically divided planet. The class is discussion based; no lectures.

ENMC 4530 Seminar in Modern Literature and Culture

Section 001 - J. M. Coetzee in his Times

MW 330-445 (Bryan 330)
Instructor: Christopher Krentz

In this seminar we will study the acclaimed writing of contemporary author J. Coetzee in context.  While his lean, spare prose may seem direct and accessible, it often leads to ambiguities and searching questions on matters like race, gender, disability, human rights, the legacies of European colonialism, and the ethical treatment of animals.  Since Coetzee is originally from South Africa, we will examine the racist system of segregation, called apartheid, that prevailed there for much of the twentieth century.  Along the way, we will consider such works as Alan Paton’s Cry, the Beloved Country; a few of Nadine Gordimer’s short stories; the documentary film Amandla!; and perhaps Nelson Mandela’s Long Walk to Freedom.  We will also probably read Western literary influences on Coetzee like Franz Kafka and Samuel Beckett.  Such works will aid us in investigating many of Coetzee’s celebrated novels, including Waiting for the Barbarians, Life & Times of Michael K, Foe, Disgrace, Boyhood, The Lives of Animals, Youth, and Summertime.  Requirements include thoughtful participation, occasional quizzes and e-mail responses, a presentation, a short paper, and a longer paper.

American Literature

ENAM 3140 African-American Literature II

TR 800-915 (Nau 141)
Instructor: Lisa Woolfork
 
This course concentrates on twentieth and twenty-first century African American novels, short stories, and prose essays. This lecture and participation-based class will address literature from pivotal cultural and political moments in African American life, such as the Harlem Renaissance and the Black Arts Movement. Writers include, but are not limited to, Zora Neale Hurston, Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, James Baldwin, Octavia Butler, and Martha Southgate. Mandatory assignments include weekly responses, quizzes, midterm and final exams.
 

ENAM 3180 Introduction to Asian American Studies

TR 1100-1215 (Rouss Hall 410)
Instructor: Sylvia Chong
Combined section with AMST 3180-001
 
An interdisciplinary introduction to the culture and history of Asians and Pacific Islanders in America. Examines ethnic communities such as Chinese, Japanese, Filipino, Korean, Asian Indian, and Native Hawaiian, through themes such as immigration, labor, cultural production, war, assimilation, and politics. Texts are drawn from genres such as legal cases, short fiction, musicals, documentaries, visual art, and drama. 
 

ENAM 3240 Faulkner

Lecture:  MW 1200-1250 (New Cabell 132)
Discussion: TR 330 -420 or 430-520 (Maury 113)
Instructor: Stephen Railton
 
An intensive study of the major Yoknapatawpha fictions, the novels and stories Faulkner set in the imaginative county he called his "postage stamp of native soil" and which provided him across his career with a site where the history of the old South and the project of the Modernist artist could intersect with the enduring story of what he called "the human heart in conflict with itself."

ENAM 4500 Advanced Studies in American Literature

Section 001 - American Renaissance

TR 330-445 (New Cabell 211)
Instructor: Emily Ogden

From the publication of Ralph Waldo Emerson's Nature (1836) to Walt Whitman's Leaves of Grass (1855), the American Renaissance was a moment of extraordinary flowering in the literary arts. In this course we will read a selection of the great works of literature published in this period, asking about them on their own terms and in relation to contemporary political reform movements.  Authors will include Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry Thoreau, Margaret Fuller, Lydia Maria Child, Frederick Douglass, Herman Melville, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Emily Dickinson, and Walt Whitman.

Fulfills the English major requirement for a course in literature published between 1700 and 1900.

Section 002 - Literature of the West: Masculinities of the Modern American West

TR 930-1045 (Nau 241)
Instructor: Frank Papovich

This semester we’ll focus on contemporary prose, poetry, and film that explores various historic and cultural aspects of masculinity in the New West.  We’ll read works (and view films) written by (or based on the work of) Wallace Stegner, Larry McMurtry, Annie Proulx, James Welch, Denis Johnson, Cormac McCarthy, Jimmy Santiago Baca,  Louise Erdrich, and Sherman Alexie.  Expect to read widely, to speak regularly, to write often, to present your ideas collegially and cooperatively, and to complete the semester with an extended written project.

Section 003 - Modern Love and U.S. Literature

TR 1100-1215 (Kerchof 317)
Instructor: Victoria Olwell

Maybe love is eternal, but it’s also historical and ideological.  It is shaped by custom, law, and narrative, and it is central to the formation of private and public life alike.  This course examines romantic love in U.S. fiction from the late nineteenth through the early twentieth-first centuries.  Our primary texts will cross genres as well as centuries as we examine romance, realism, modernism, post-modernism, and documentary.  In addition, we’ll read archival and scholarly non-fiction.  We’ll interpret fiction in light of historical changes in conceptions of love, based in factors including shifting economic conditions, changing legal and social conceptions of marriage, love, citizenship, and queer sexualities, and modern psychology.  We’ll discern the connections between romantic love and ideas of race, gender, nationhood and empire.  Primary texts will include the following books: Alison Bechdel, Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic; John Cheever, Bullet Park; Kate Chopin, The Awakening; Jennifer Egan, A Visit from the Good Squad; Sui Sin Far, Mrs. Spring Fragrance; Gish Jen, Mona in the Promised Land; Nella Larsen, Quicksand; Toni Morrison, Sula.  In addition, the course includes a film, Derek Cianfrance's Blue Valentine, and a video, Marlon Rigg's Tongues Untied.  Students will be graded on two short papers, class participation, and a 10-15-page final paper. 

ENAM 4840 Fictions of Black Identity

TR 930-1045 (Nau 142)
Instructor: Lisa Woolfork

This advanced undergraduate seminar will explore the dual meaning of its title “Fictions of Black Identity.”  The first implication suggests the literary inventions (novels, essays, critical works) that address the meanings of blackness in an American context.  The second meaning is heavily invested in the first: that Black identity is a fiction, not necessarily in the sense of falsity, but in its highly mediated, flexible, and variable condition.  Questions to consider include:  how does one make and measure Black identity?  Can one be phenotypically White and still be Black?  What is the value of racial masquerade?  What does it mean to be legitimately Black?  Readings include, but are not limited to, Percival Everett’s Erasure, Rebecca Walker’s Black, White, and Jewish, Paul Beatty’s White Boy Shuffle, and a range of critical essays.  Mandatory assignments include leading class discussion, midterm project and seminar paper.  This class is designed for students majoring in English, African American Studies, and/or American Studies.

Genre Studies

ENGN 3840 Satire

MW 200-315 (New Cabell 323)
Instructor: John O'Brien

What is satire?  Most of us feel like can identify satire when we see it, and it probably says something not particularly encouraging about our moment in history that it has produced a lot of great satire:  Jon Stewart, Stephen Colbert, John Oliver, Amy Schumer, Key and Peele, and The Onion have reached wide audiences by offering brilliant satirical perspectives on contemporary issues.  At the same time, we have also recently seen how satire can mark a limit where art prompts violent reaction, as when the Hollywood movie The Interview, a satire on the North Korean leader Kim Jong Il, apparently caused the North Korean government to launch a cyberattack on the film’s producer Sony Pictures.  More terribly, in January 2015, two French-born Islamic extremists entered the offices of the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo and killed twelve members of its editorial staff in apparent retaliation for the magazine’s mocking representations of the Prophet Muhammed.  Satire gives the lie to the idea that art is not concerned with, or can have any effect on, the real world.
 
In this course, we will work together to understand the contours of this elusive but enduring form. Our central examples will be texts ranging from the ancient world—the poetical lanx satura of Roman writers Horace and Juvenal—to the present day, in the form of fictions by authors like Margaret Atwood (The Handmaid’s Tale) and Thomas Pynchon (The Crying of Lot 49).  We will pay particular attention to the great English satirists of the eighteenth century like John Wilmot, Jonathan Swift, Alexander Pope, Samuel Johnson, and Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, who took the ancient Roman poetic genre and refashioned it, in verse and prose, into a powerful vehicle for critique.  And we will also consult the modern mass-media satirists mentioned above, who are often very conscious of the tradition in which they are working, as well as some films.  In the course of our reading and discussions, we’ll also try to reach some consensus on what satire is, how it is distinguished from comedy in general, and what work it does (and does not do) in society.  Requirements: frequent (non-satirical) participation, quizzes, short writing assignments, one substantial paper, final examination.

ENGN 4500 Advanced Studies in Literary Genres

Section 001 - Tragedy
MW 330-445 (New Cabell 211)
Instructor: Paul Cantor

This course studies the theory and practice of tragedy across the centuries in different cultures and different media. It is open to all students; it is NOT restricted to comparative literature majors or to fourth-year students. We begin with the three major philosopher-theorists of tragedy: Aristotle, Hegel, and Nietzsche. We then look at the two greatest eras of tragic drama: Ancient Athens (Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides) and Renaissance England (Marlowe, Shakespeare, and John Ford). We continue with later tragic dramatists (Schiller, Pushkin), as we examine how tragedy develops in a variety of countries. We then analyze how tragedy migrates to another medium (the novel) in Hardy and Tolstoy. Finally we discuss Eugene O’Neill’s effort to recreate Greek tragedy in his Mourning Becomes Electra. All foreign language works are read in English translation. Requirements include a seminar presentation and a seminar paper.

Section 002
TR 1100-1215 (New Cabell 232)
Instructor: Kevin Hart

English Language Studies

 

Criticism

ENCR 3559 New Course in Criticism

Section 001 - "What is World Literature?  Global Connections across Media"

MW 200-315 (Bryan 235)
Instructors: Jennifer Wicke and Madigan Haley

Cross-listed with CPLT 3590-003

Drawing on literature, film, and other media from around the world, as well as theories of cosmopolitanism and planetary ethics, this course asks big questions about what makes a work “global”; and it explores how story-telling invented the very idea of a unified “world.” Our inquiry will take flight at the origins of literature—with epics like Gilgamesh that discover a wider world—and bring us up to the present day, as contemporary media cross borders in unprecedented ways. Along the way, theories of globalization, transnationalism, and translation will meet issues of aesthetics and empathy beyond the nation. Our animating concern will be what defines the worldly in literature and how we can aspire to become global readers and actors. Likely authors include Khalidasa, Basho, Poe, Tolstoy, Cesaire, Rhys, Tutuola, Manto, Shahid Ali, Wallace, and Cole; with films by Alice Guy-Blache, Gillo Pontecorvo, Wong Kar Wai, and Ana Lily Amirpour.

ENCR 4500 Advanced Studies in Literary Criticism

Section 001 - How Poems Think: TR 330-445 (Bryan 334)
Instructors: Walter Jost

Section 002 - Critical Race Theory: TR 330-445 (Bryan 310)
Instructors: Marlon Ross

How has the notion of race shaped, and been shaped by, changing relations to other experiences of identity stemming from gender, sexuality, class, disability, multiculturalism, nationality, and globalism?  This course surveys major trends in black literary theory from the 1960s to the present, focusing on a series of critical flashpoints or controversies that have occurred over the last several decades: 1) the crisis over black authenticity during the Black Power/Black Arts movement, focused on the music of James Brown and the poetry of Amiri Baraka; 2) the schisms related to womanism (or women of color feminism), focused on Alice Walker’s novel The Color Purple and the reception to its Steven Spielberg film adaptation; 3) the debate over the social construction of race, focused on the work of Henry Louis Gates, Jr. and Percival Everett’s postmodern novel Not Sidney Poitier; 4) the controversy over the so-called downlow and queer of color critique, focused on two films, Cheryl Dunye’s The Watermelon Woman and Rodney Evans’ Brother to Brother, 5) the debate over “post-racialism” focused on Afro-optimism/pessimism and the Black Lives Matter movement. While concentrating on theories of race deriving from African American studies, we’ll also touch on key texts from Native American, Chicano/a, Asian American, and postcolonial studies. In addition to the materials listed above, the readings will include a variety of theoretical essays drawn from different disciplines, including legal theory, film and media studies, sociology, history, political theory, and hip hop studies. The goal of the course is to give you a solid grounding in the vocabulary, key figures, concepts, debates, and discursive styles comprising the broad sweep of theoretical race studies from the late-twentieth century to the present, and to nurture your own theorizing about race and its deep cultural impact.  Graded assignments include two class presentations, two short position papers, and a 15-page term paper.

Section 003 - Race in American Places: T 500-730 (Nau 241)
Instructors: Ian Grandison

This interdisciplinary seminar uses the method of Critical Landscape Analysis to explore how everyday places and spaces, "landscapes," are involved in the negotiation of power in American society.  Landscapes, as we engage the idea, may encompass seemingly private spaces (within the walls of a suburban bungalow or of a government subsidized apartment) to seemingly public spaces (the vest pocket park in lower Manhattan where the Occupy Movement was launched in September 2011; the Downtown Mall, with its many privately operated outdoor cafés, that occupy the path along which East Main Street once flowed freely in Charlottesville; or even the space of invisible AM and FM radio waves that the FCC supposedly regulates in the public's interest).  We launchour exploration by considering landscapes as arenas of the Culture Wars.  With this context, we unearth ways in which places are planned, designed, constructed, and mythologized in the struggle to assert and enforce social (especially racial) distinctions, difference, and hierarchy.  You will be moved to understand how publicly financed freeways were planned not only to facilitate some citizens' modern progress, but also to block others from accessing rights, protections, and opportunities to which casually we believe all "Americans" are entitled.  We study landscapes not only as represented in written and non-written forms, but also through direct sensory, emotional, and intellectual experience during two mandatory field trips to places in our region. In addition to informal group exercises and individual mid-term exam, critical field trip reflection paper, and final exam, you are required to complete in small groups a final research project on a topic you choose that relates to the seminar. Past topics have ranged from the racial politics of farmers’ markets in gentrifying inner cities to the gender--and the transgender exclusion--politics of universal standards for public restroom pictograms.  Students showcase such results in an informal symposium that culminates the semester.  Not only will you expand the complexity and scope of your critical thinking abilities, but also you will never again experience as ordinary the spaces and places you encounter from day to day.

Special Topics in Literature

ENSP 2810 Women and Media in the Global South

TR 200-315 (New Cabell 058)
Instructor: Lisa Goff

Combined section with MESA 2559-001

This course examines women and media in the Middle East, South Asia, and North Africa through the lenses of new media, journalism, feminism, and gender studies, with cross-cultural comparisons to the U.S.

ENSP 3300 Literary Editing

MW 200-315 (Bryan 203)
Instructor: James Livingood

This course covers contemporary literary editing techniques and teaches students how to publish book-length works using modern print and electronic processes.  The course may require students to purchase/lease computer software in addition to textbooks.

ENSP 3559 Literary Ideals / Self and Soul

TR 1230-145 (Ruffner 175)
Instructor: Mark Edmundson

In this class we’ll study the three major ideals of the Western tradition.  We will consider courage (by way of Homer); compassion (through the Gospels); and the quest for wisdom (through Plato).  We’ll also look at some consequential anti-idealists—maybe Freud, maybe Nietzsche.  We’ll talk about Self.  We’ll talk about Soul.

ENSP 4500 Advanced Studies in Special Topics in Literature

Section 001 - Migrant Europe

MW 330-445 (Monroe 114)
Instructor: Sarah Cole

From an American perspective, Europe usually appears as a point of origin—an ancient, traditional society, which sent enterprising immigrants from the “old country” to our New World.  Yet, when we explore the literature and history of modern Europe, we see a very different view: a cultural landscape full of movement and change. In the past half century, Europe has been transformed by the end of the Cold War, the collapse of the “Iron Curtain,” the creation of the European Union, and the arrival of immigrants from former colonies. Taking a cue from current debates about a “migrant crisis” in Europe, this course will re-examine major works of modern European literature by focusing on depictions of migration, ethnic minority identity, and shifting borders.  Our main texts, ranging from the nineteenth century to the present, will include Pushkin’s “Bronze Horseman,” George Eliot’s Daniel Deronda, Günter Grass’s The Tin Drum, and films such as My Beautiful Laundrette and Hate (La haine).  Course requirements will include several short writing assignments, a research paper, and an in-class presentation, as well as active participation in seminar discussions.

Section 002 - How Poetry Can Save Your Life

T 1130-200 (Bryan 233)
Instructor: Gregory Orr
Weekly Seminar / Discussion, Restricted to Instructor Consent

Presumes a familiarity with and passion for poetry.  We will read poems from various times and cultures to explore the ways they dramatize the mysteries, passions and circumstances of being human.  We’ll ponder lyric poetry as an essential meaning-making project that has significance for our own lives.  By semester’s end, each student will have assembled a selection of poems that are essential to him/her and write an essay to accompany this collection. 

ENSP 5559 New Course in Special Topics in Literature (cross listed with SARC 5500)

Topic: "The Idea of Venice"
TR 200-315 (Campbell 325)
Instructor: John Casteen

Venice has engaged the English (and Americans) since the earliest known travel narratives.  Venetian civic life, social hierarchies and rituals, commercialism, and even militarism influence us.  The city’s isolation on its 118 islands; its exotic physicality; its urban plan and buildings; its Moorishness and Gothicism; and its commercial and political pursuits inform our daily lives.  We will read samples of English and American literature reflecting this engagement with Venice, view films and related texts as well as works of art and architecture, including urban designs, and seek to build theses about what Venice has come to be in our common imaginations and how Venetian images and ideas work in the world around us.

ENSP 5820 The Culture of London Past and Present

Location and Time TBA
Restricted to Instructor Permission
Instructor: Clare Kinney, Michael Levenson

The Culture of London: Past and Present" offers an interdisciplinary approach to metropolitan culture, as an historically embedded object of inquiry. Located in London, it runs for a month each year from early June to early July.  Faculty members from the University direct, teach and lead the class; they are complemented by London-based specialists in architecture, art history, religious studies and contemporary politics. 

ENSP 5830 Literature and Film

TR 1100-1215 (Bryan 310)
Restricted to 4th-Years, Graduate Students, Instructor Permission
Instructor: Walter Korte

“Studies the relationship between literature and film, emphasizing the literary origins and backgrounds of the cinema, verbal and visual languages, and the theoretical and practical challenges of adapting novels and short stories. Typically, we undertake an intensive textual analysis of works by Nabokov, McEwan, Burgess, O’Connor, Wharton, McCarthy, Kafka and Mann, and filmic adaptations by Kubrick, Welles, Scorsese, Huston, Pinter and Visconti.

Requirements include active seminar participation and occasional short response papers, final exam and paper. There is a weekly two-hour screening at 7:00 on Sunday evenings.”

Related Courses in Other Departments

CPLT 2020 History of European Literature II (4 Credits)

Lecture:  TR 1230-145 (Maury 104)

Discussion Section 102: R 500-615 (New Cabell 183)

Discussion Section 103: R 630-745 (Wilson 238)
Instructor: Paul Cantor
Cross-listed with ENGL 2020

This course surveys European literature from the seventeenth century to the twentieth.  Although it builds upon work in CPLT 2010, 2020 is a self-contained course and can certainly be taken by students who have not taken 2010.  As a course in literary history, it seeks to develop an understanding of period concepts, such as “Romantic” and “modern,” as well as concepts of genre, such as “the novel.” Among the topics to be discussed are the rise of the novel, the nature of the Enlightenment, the Romantic revolution in poetry, the new role of women in literature, responses to revolution and imperialism, nihilism and modern literature, and the issue of postmodernism.  Readings include (sometimes in the form of selections) Tartuffe, Robinson Crusoe, Candide, Faust, Persuasion, Wuthering Heights, Notes from Underground, and Waiting for Godot, as well as poetry by Blake, T. S. Eliot, and Rilke and short stories by Kafka. All foreign language works will be read in English translation.  Two lectures and one section meeting per week.  Requirements:  three papers and a final examination, as well as regular attendance and participation in discussion sections.  The course fulfills the Second Writing Requirement, and 3 hours of it can be counted toward the English major under the “literature in translation” option; under the ENGL 2020 rubric, it can be used in lieu of an ENLT course as the pre-requisite for the English major. 

CPLT 3590 Topics in Comparative Literature

Changing topics with explore Comparative Literature topics, such as theory, genre, periods, or major authors with an international impact.

Section 001: "Memory Speaks" - TR 1100-1215 (Brooks 103)
Instructor: Lorna Martens
Combined Section with GETR 3590-005

 

Section 002: "Drama for Feminists" - TR 200-315 ( New Cabell 291)
Instructor: Benjamin Bennett
Combined Sections with GETR 3590-003
 
Section 003 - "What is World Literature?  Global Connections across Media"
 
MW 200-315 (Bryan 235)
Instructors: Jennifer Wicke and Madigan Haley
Combined Sections with ENCR 3559
 
Drawing on literature, film, and other media from around the world, as well as theories of cosmopolitanism and planetary ethics, this course asks big questions about what makes a work “global”; and it explores how story-telling invented the very idea of a unified “world.”  Our inquiry will take flight at the origins of literature—with epics like Gilgamesh that discover a wider world—and bring us up to the present day, as contemporary media cross borders in unprecedented ways.  Along the way, theories of globalization, transnationalism, and translation will meet issues of aesthetics and empathy beyond the nation.  Our animating concern will be what defines the worldly in literature and how we can aspire to become global readers and actors.  Likely authors include Khalidasa, Basho, Poe, Tolstoy, Cesaire, Rhys, Tutuola, Manto, Shahid Ali, Wallace, and Cole; with films by Alice Guy-Blache, Gillo Pontecorvo, Wong Kar Wai, and Ana Lily Amirpour.
 
Section 004: "Spirit Journeys in YA Fictions" - WF 200-315 (Gibson 103)
Instructor: John Alexander
Combined Section with GETR 3563-001

CPLT 4990 Comparative Literature Seminar:  Tragedy

MW 330-445 (New Cabell 211)
Instructor: Paul Cantor
Cross-listed with ENGN 4500

This course studies the theory and practice of tragedy across the centuries in different cultures and different media. It is open to all students; it is NOT restricted to comparative literature majors or to fourth-year students. We begin with the three major philosopher-theorists of tragedy: Aristotle, Hegel, and Nietzsche. We then look at the two greatest eras of tragic drama: Ancient Athens (Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides) and Renaissance England (Marlowe, Shakespeare, and John Ford). We continue with later tragic dramatists (Schiller, Pushkin), as we examine how tragedy develops in a variety of countries. We then analyze how tragedy migrates to another medium (the novel) in Hardy and Tolstoy. Finally we discuss Eugene O’Neill’s effort to recreate Greek tragedy in his Mourning Becomes Electra.  All foreign language works are read in English translation. Requirements include a seminar presentation and a seminar paper.

CPLT 4999 Fourth Year Thesis

Location and Time TBA
Instructor: Paul Cantor

IHGC 3559 Global Shakespeare on Film

TR 330-445 (Brooks 103)
Instructor: Gretchen York

This course, focused on filmed adaptations of Shakespeare from around the world, introduces students to the global voices that have transformed his plays in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.  Studying films alongside the playtexts that inspired them, students will consider Shakespeare’s global themes and the art of cinematic adaptation while also addressing the films’ local contexts and their engagement with questions of western cultural hegemony.  Discovering a transnational Shakespeare through the diverse artists who adapt his plays, the course encourages participants to analyze and repurpose the English Renaissance for an increasingly globalized world.

Tentative list of plays: Hamlet, Macbeth, Othello

Tentative list of films: Gamlet (Kozintsev), Prince of the Himalayas (Hu), Throne of Blood (Kurosawa), Mickey B (Magill), Makibefo (Abela), Omkara (Bhardwaj), Omar (Abu-Assad)