1. University of Virginia
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Undergraduate Course Descriptions Spring 2015

English Surveys

ENGL 1500 Masterworks of Literature: Edgar Allan Poe

330-445 TR - DELL 1, 103
Instructor: Emily Ogden

In this course we see nineteenth-century America reflected in a fun-house mirror—that is to say, we view the period through Edgar Allan Poe's work. We remember Poe now as a writer of horror fiction and spooky verse. But he was also a satirist, a commentator on media, a perpetrator of hoaxes, an innovator in the detective story, and an ambitious theorist of matter and the universe. His works open out into a bizarre and tumultuous nineteenth century: a world of hot air balloons and hypnosis; of hidden treasures and unquiet graves; of talking birds and speaking beer bottles; of condemned criminals and knowing slaves. The course is designed for non-English majors. There is no presumption of prior experience with the discipline's methods.

ENGL 2020 History of European Literature 1

200-315 TR - DELL 1, 105
Instructor: Walter Jost
Cross-listed with CPLT 2020

This course surveys European literature from the seventeenth century to the present.  As a course in literary history, it seeks to develop an understanding of period concepts, as well as concepts of genre (including the novel, Romantic lyric, and modern drama) and concepts of literary modes, such as realism and the Gothic.  Readings include (sometimes in the form of selections) Tartuffe, Robinson Crusoe, The Princess of Cleves, Faust (Part One), Rameau’s Nephew, Tales of Hoffmann, Madame Bovary, Walden, Notes from the Underground, Waiting for Godot, and poems and short stories from Blake, Wordsworth, Eliot, Calvino, Kafka, Cavafy, Rilke, and others.  All foreign language works will be read in English translation.  Requirements: three papers and a final examination.  Two lectures and one section meeting per week.  This course satisfies the Second Writing Requirement and can be counted toward the English major for 3 hours of 'Literature in Translation.'

ENGL 3820 History of Literatures in English I, section 001

1200-1250 MW - WILSON 402
Instructor: Alison Booth and John O'Brien

Libertines and puritans, captives and emancipators, colonists and citizens, poets, novelists, playwrights: these form the cast of our exploration into the writing of the English-speaking world from the middle of the seventeenth through the end of the nineteenth centuries. In this course, the second part of the English Department’s three-semester sequence of literature written in English, we will study the works of writers in Britain and North America, tracing the evolution of poetic, narrative, dramatic, and expository forms, the emergence of modern identities and rights, and the first post-colonial literature in the early United States. We will be reading the works of many writers, including Aphra Behn, Jonathan Swift, Benjamin Franklin, Jane Austen, John Keats, Edgar Allan Poe, George Eliot, Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, and Oscar Wilde. Students are expected to attend two lectures and one discussion section each week. Two papers, a midterm, and a final exam. Open to all undergraduates; required of English majors.

Introductory Seminars in Literature

ENLT 2100 Introduction to Literary Studies

200-315 MW - BRYAN 330
Instructor: Stephen Railton

ENLT 2511 Masterpieces of English Literature: The Bible and Medieval Literature

110-1215 TR - NAU 142
Instructor: Zachary Stone

Throughout the medieval period writers consistently returned to biblical narratives in order to engage their audience. Readings in this course will include a wide range of texts in poetry and prose and ranging in genre from devotional lyrics of to historical chronicles. The course will explore the ways in which English writers prior to Shakespeare read and appropriated biblical narratives, themes, and styles. This class will strive for generic and theoretical breadth, and focus as much on discontinuity and heterodoxy as orthodox representations of Biblical narratives in Early English literature. Selections from Genesis, Exodus, Joshua, and Judges will be read in conjunction with selections from Old English Genesis, Beowulf, Pastoral Care and Heptateuch.  The Davidic narratives from 1&2 Samuel, Kings, Chronicles, and Psalms inform both Old and Middle English chronicles as well as psalmody.  Selections from the prophetic books will be juxtaposed with medieval commentary and homiletic materials from both the Old and Middle English periods. The passion narratives will be paired with selections from dramatic and devotional texts such as N-Town and Nicholas Love’s Blessed Life of Jesus Christ. I hope to conclude by exploring Chaucer’s “Wife of Bath’s Tale” alongside the Pauline antifeminist tradition and Langland’s apocalyticism.  While the primary focus of the course will remain on the literary texts in question, this course also aims to provide students with a basic cultural literacy regarding scriptural appropriation that would inform the study of any period of English Literature. 

*All readings will be available in translation.

ENLT 2513 Major Authors of American Literature

1100-1150 MWF - BRYAN 332
Instructor: Katie Bray

ENLT 2513 Major Authors of American Literature: Race and Performance

330-445 TR - SHANNON HOUSE 108
Instructor: Sarah Ingle

ENLT 2514 Modern American Authors: Coming of Age in America

330-445 TR - MONROE 115
Instructor: Kristin Gilger

Focusing on American coming-of-age stories by minority writers (broadly defined) from the 1950s to the present, this course will explore how the modern American novel's concerns with formation and narrative intersect with changing questions about identity, diversity, and nation. We will read work by such authors as Ralph Ellison, Gish Jen, Alison Bechdel, Sherman Alexie, and Cristina Henríquez to examine how stories of finding one's place in the world probe, at the same time that they transform, the possibilities for young people of diverse backgrounds to claim their place in America. Course requirements will include active participation, short response papers, three essays, and a final exam.

ENLT 2523 Studies in Poetry: Contemporary Poetry

200-315 MW - BRYAN 334
Instructor: Jahan Ramazani

What is poetry? And what is distinctive about contemporary poetry? In this seminar, focused on contemporary American poetry, we will examine an array of postwar idioms, forms, and movements, whether the poetry is written in inherited forms, free verse, or avant-garde styles. While devoting much of our attention to some of the most influential poetry from the second half of the twentieth century, we will also bring ourselves up to date by examining some of the best poems published in recent years. Among requirements are active participation; reading quizzes; your framing of discussion questions to help lead discussion; and a series of papers and revisions. Our texts will be from Contemporary Poetry, volume 2 of The Norton Anthology of Modern and Contemporary Poetry, third edition, as supplemented by newly published poetry.

ENLT 2526 Studies in Fiction: Medical Narratives

0930-1045 TR - BRYAN 312
Instructor: Anna Brickhouse

This seminar is designed for future English majors, students who may one day enter the medical fields, and all students who love stories. It explores the history of the American short story from the nineteenth century through our own by focusing specifically on medical themes: ailing and injured bodies and minds; doctors, nurses, and patients; the social construction of disease and madness as well as of health and sanity. It is widely acknowledged today in the various fields of medical research and clinical training that the effective and humane practice of medicine requires what has been called “narrative competence”: the ability to recognize and interpret the stories people tell, to attend closely to the details that accumulate to make a larger meaning, to evaluate contradictory and competing hypotheses about meaning, and finally to appreciate and respond to a given narrative as an expression of humanity. But if these skills are in high demand within the medical fields, they are also skills for the future English major. The course will help students to hone their practice of close reading, attending to the formal elements of narrative (plot, character, style, tone, imagery, figures of speech, etc.) in close detail, while also investigating the fluctuating relationship between a narrative and its cultural and historical contexts. At the same time, the course will focus on writing: how to use written assignments to ask questions of stories that are worth answering, and how to respond in compelling and persuasive detail. We will discuss and write about classic stories as well as newer writers, asking what we can take with us from these narratives for use in our own lives.

ENLT 2526 Studies in Fiction: Science Fiction

1230-145 TR - BRYAN 334
Instructor: Patricia Sullivan

Space travel, time travel, apocalypses, technology and science at its best and worst, alternative pasts, parallel universes, speculative futures, human, aliens, artificial intelligences, cyborgs and more.  We will read novels and short stories that are classified loosely as science fiction, though there may be some overlap with other subgenres such speculative fiction or fantasy fiction.  We will also read some literary criticism that analyzes and comments on various science fictions texts.  Along the way, we will consider key aspects of narrative literature, questions of social relevance (science fiction is often read allegorically) and other various ways of interpreting the past, present, and future of science fiction.

ENLT 2526 Studies in Fiction

1200-1250 MWF - BRYAN 330
Instructor: Britta Rowe

ENLT 2526 Studies in Fiction: The Contemporary British Novel

930-1045 TR - NAU 241
Instructor: Jesse Bordwin

In this class we will chart the English novel from 1945 until the present, through the lens of 20th and 21st century British history. How did the novel respond to World War Two and its aftermath, the collapse of Empire, the austerity years, the Troubles, and immigration, and how did it in turn shape English identity? This is a reading intensive course: authors may include Waugh, Amis, Greene, Spark, Rhys, Rushdie, Ishiguro, Smith and Rowling.

ENLT 2526 Special Topics: Victorian Afterlives

1000-1050 MWF - BRYAN 312
Instructor: Kirsten Andersen

 

ENLT 2530 Studies in Globalized Literature: Partition Fiction and Political Violence

500-615 TR - CABELL 065
Instructor: Anuj Kapoor

ENLT 2530 Studies in Globalized Literature: Global Modernism

330-445 TR - SHANNON HOUSE 109
Instructor: Madigan Haley

ENLT 2547 Black Writers in America: Framing the Movement the Civil Rights Movement in Fiction, Non-Fiction, Photography &Film

200-315 TR - BRYAN 310
Instructor:  Deborah McDowell

This multi-media course will survey selected fiction, non-fiction, photography and film from the U. S. Civil Rights Movement.  The arc of the course spans the Brown v. Topeka decision (1954) to the emergence of SNCC and the Black Power Movement.  Topics for discussion will include the interplay between history and memory, as well as gender, sexuality, and class, in representations of the period; ideologies of black liberation and the tactics of mass protest; the relationship between the movement and mass media industries; debates about race and rights; the politics of race and the fragility of citizenship; the economics of racial oppression and resistance.  

Texts will include: 

FICTION:   James Baldwin’s “Going to Meet the Man,” Flannery O’Connor’s “Everything that Rises Must Converge; Eudora Welty’s “Where is the Voice Coming From?”  Henry Dumas’s “The Marchers,” Alice Walker’s Meridian and “Advancing Luna and Ida B. Wells”; Bebe Moore Campbell’s Your Blues Ain’t Like Mine; Ernest Gaines’s The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman.

NON-FICTION:  Brown v. Topeka (judicial decision); Bayard Rustin’s I Must Resist:  Bayard Rustin’s Life in Letters; Martin Luther King’s “Letter from Birmingham Jail,” James Baldwin’s The Fire Next Time (selections); John Howard Griffith’s Black Like Me; Sarah Patton Boyle’s The Desegregated Heart, Septima Clark’s Ready from Within:  A First Person Narrative

PHOTOGRAPHY:  Selections from Charles Moore’s Powerful Days:  The Civil Rights Photography of Charles Moore; Road to Freedom: Photographs of the Civil Rights Movement, 1956-1968;” Photography of Ernest Withers

FILM:  Eyes on the Prize; Freedom Riders; Four Little Girls; Freedom Summer; Ghosts of Mississippi; The Long Walk Home; The Loving Story.

ENLT 2547 Black Writers in America: The Multimedia Harlem Renaissance

200-315 MW - CABELL 323
Instructor: Marlon Ross

The 1920s Jazz Age from a multimedia perspective of the Harlem Renaissance in literature, journalism, painting, sculpture, dance, music, photography, film, and politics, focusing on Chicago, D.C., and Richmond, as well as Harlem..

ENLT 2548 Contemporary Literature

1100-1215 TR - BRYAN 334
Instructor: 
Budr-un-nisa Khan

ENLT 2552 Women in Literature: Scribbling Women

1000-1050 MWF - BRYAN 328
Instructor: Indu Ohri

Ever since Aphra Behn became the first professional female writer in England, the figure of the woman author has occupied an important role in the literary imagination of poets, novelists, and readers. In Behn’s wake, large numbers of women entered the literary marketplace in the hopes of supporting themselves through their writing, only to find their work belittled, dismissed, and stereotyped. Nathaniel Hawthorne claimed that this “damned mob of scribbling women” was universally adored by readers, but women writers were highly conscious of the limits they faced in pursuing their careers. This course will explore the literary representation of the woman writer by focusing on the female Kunstlerroman, a narrative about the growth of a woman into a mature artist. Starting with Behn’s Oroonoko, we will trace the development of the female Kunstlerroman across a variety of literary forms, historical periods, and cultural contexts. The following questions will be central to our readings and discussions about the literary portrayal of the woman author and her use of writing to navigate social constraints: How does the female Kunstlerroman rework, undermine, or challenge identity categories such as gender, race, and nationality? What limits do female authors struggle with in using writing as a way to assert themselves? How do these fictional artists find a way to reconcile their professional aspirations with their desire for sex, love, and marriage? Possible authors include Aphra Behn, Charlotte Brontë, Virginia Woolf, Alice Munroe, Alison Bechdel, Sandra Cisneros, and Jamaica Kincaid.

ENLT 2552 Women in Literature: Women's Human Rights

500-615 MW - BRYAN 310
Instructor: Audrey Golden

In this course, we will explore human rights and globality in the twentieth century with an eye toward gender. Looking to texts written both by and about women, we will ask how movements between cultures, ethnicities, and nations amidst social struggle and violence have shaped a distinctly gendered identity. Can literature help us to reimagine women’s rights and freedoms within the politicized landscape of the contemporary world? And how might aesthetics of violence teach us about bodily and social harms that affect women across the globe? As we investigate the relationship between gender and international human rights law, the course will become largely interdisciplinary as it engages with literary, political, and historical texts. Likely texts will include Edwidge Danticat's The Farming of Bones, Manju Kapur's Difficult Daughters, Bapsi Sidhwa's Cracking India, and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's Purple Hibiscus.

ENLT 2555 Special Topics: The Wars in European Literature

330-445 MW - MONROE 114
Instructor: Sarah Rose Cole

The First and Second World Wars transformed European culture and challenged poets, novelists, and filmmakers. Why create art in a time a mass violence and upheaval? How could a film, poem, or literary narrative do justice to the raw experience of war? In this course, we will explore a diverse group of responses from authors in Britain, France, and Germany, ranging from the gritty realism of Remarque’s All Quiet on the Western Front to the elegant modernism of Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway. We will pay equal attention to literary techniques and social identities, examining questions of gender, sexuality, ethnicity, and disability in war literature. The seminar will emphasize close reading, active participation, and analytical writing. Requirements include three essays, a final exam, and an in-class presentation. Among our main texts will be poems by Wilfred Owen, W.B. Yeats, and Paul Celan; novels by Virginia Woolf, Erich Maria Remarque, Heinrich Böll, and Irene Nemirovsky; memoirs by Vera Brittain and Elie Wiesel; and films by Jean Renoir and Louis Malle.

ENLT 2555 Special Topics: The Vicious Arts

1230-145 MWF - BRYAN 332
Instructor: Stephen Hequembourg

ENLT 2555 Special Topics: Making Meaning

900-950 MWF - BRYAN 330
Instructor: Stephen Railton

Only a few people are creative writers, but everyone is constantly constructing narratives.  Even fewer people are practicing literary critics, but everyone is constantly engaged in the act of interpretation. In this course we will look closely at the way meaning -- of a text, of someone else's body language, of all kinds of signs and symbols -- is something we are always making.  Most of our texts will be literary: novels like Austen's Pride and Prejudice and Nabokov's Pale Fire, stories by Poe and Morrison, poems from various periods.  But we'll also explore, and practice, and get as good as we can at all sorts of "reading."

ENLT 2555 Special Topics: Poetry's Graveyard School

500-730 R - BRYAN 235
Instructor: Andrew Stauffer

ENLT 2555 Special Topics: Off the Road: Travel in Medieval Literature

930-1045 TR - BRYAN 334
Instructor: Sherif Abdelkarim

Off the Road intends to introduce students to medieval literature and help them hone the tools they have for developing critical reading, writing, and discussion skills. Our study into medieval literature will encompass a range of genres that we will approach through the lens of travel. What did it mean to make pilgrimage in the middle ages? What company did one keep when setting out, with what sundries did one load one’s horse, or camel, or donkey? How far and why did one hit the road? To help us tackle such issues, we will explore the various conceptions of travel that dominate the writings of the time, be they romantic adventures, tales of physical or spiritual progress, or journalistic journeys, treatises, and like narrative experiments. In the final third of the course, we will sample travel texts composed since the medieval period. In addition to placing the many expressions of travel within their historical and literary frames, we will want to consider the relationship between sacred and profane forms of wayfaring on the one hand, and travel and the ‘travail’ of writing on the other.

ENLT 2555 Special Topics

900-950 MWF - BRYAN 310
Instructor: Rebecca Levy

ENLT 2555 Special Topics: King Arthur in Time

900-950 MWF - NAU 241
Instructor: Paul Broyles

ENLT 2555 Special Topics: Children's Literature

1000-1050 MWF - CABELL 036
Instructor: Rennie Mapp

Does “children’s literature” mean literature written for children or literature about children? This course takes on both types of children’s literature in order to explore the category of childhood using the tools of literary analysis.  We’ll read some rather difficult 19C novels by Charlotte Bronte, Charles Dickens, and Mark Twain, as well as more recently popular children’s literature by J.R.R. Tolkien, Laura Ingalls Wilder, Ursula K. LeGuin, and J.K. Rowling. 

Two essays and a short final exam, as well as consistent class participation.

ENLT 2555 Special Topics

330-445 TR - Dell 1, 104
Instructor: Walter Jost

It may seem odd to learn that widely-shared notions that most of us readily profess—like “freedom” and “being authentic,” “doing your own thing,” and “being your own person”—are historically pretty new.  Rousseau’s idea that man was “born free and is everywhere in chains” was a moral and political innovation largely unknown before the Romantic age.  This course is designed to introduce thoughtful readers to questions about the ethics of reading literature from the Romantics to our own time, with a particular focus on what it might mean to become an autonomous “person,” perhaps even a world-citizen (a “cosmopolitan”) in the twenty-first century.  We will study several works, among them Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby, Ibsen’s A Doll House, Kingston’s The Woman Warrior, Thoreau’s Walden, and a variety of scholarly essays, short stories, poems, and films.  3 papers, a mid-term, and a final.

Academic and News Writing

ENWR 1505 Academic Writing I

Section Locations Variable
Fall Semesters

Part I of the two-semester option for meeting the first writing requirement. Finding and developing topics, building academic arguments, and organizing essays and reports. Includes a tutorial at the writing center. Graded A, B, C, or NC. Students who take ENWR 1505 must subsequently take ENWR 1506 to complete the first writing requirement.

ENWR 1507 Academic Writing I - ESL

Section Locations Variable
Fall Semesters

Academic Writing I for students still developing fluency in English as a second language. Students who take ENWR 1507 must subsequently take ENWR 1508 to complete the first writing requirement.

ENWR 1510 Accelerated Academic Writing

Section Locations Variable
Fall and Spring Semesters

The single-semester option for meeting the first writing requirement. Framing and developing effective academic arguments, with an emphasis on essays and reports. Graded A, B, C, or NC. Students whose last names end in A-K must take ENWR 1510 in the fall; those with last names ending in L-Z take it in the spring.

ENWR 2520 Special Topics in Writing

500-615 TR – CABELL 183
Instructor: Kate Kostelnik

In this writing course, we will consider the spectrum of voices and techniques writers employ in various genres and disciplines.  We will mimic moves from multiple texts and rhetorical situations as well as follow conversations in scholarship regarding how students gain academic literacy and grow as college writers.  Using reflexive inquiry we will examine our writing processes and mix personal essay with academic argument.

Course meets Second Writing Requirement

ENWR 2520 Special Topics in Writing

500-615 TR – DELL 1, 104
Instructor: Keith Driver

Course meets Second Writing Requirement

ENWR 2520 Special Topics in Writing

500-615 TR – PAVILION VIII, B002
Instructor: Devin Donovan

In fulfillment of the second writing requirement, this course asks students to write analytically about the scholarly communities of which they are a part. With a critical and creative eye, we will examine how ideas are communicated effectively within -- and between -- different disciplines to gain a better understanding of the kind of writing our majors and fields of interest require of us. 

Course meets Second Writing Requirement

ENWR 2520 Special Topics in Writing

1000-1050 MWF - NAU 241
Instructor: Ashley Faulkner

ENWR 2700 Newswriting, sections 001 and 002

930-145am TR and 800-915am TR - Bryan 203, both sections
Course Meets Second Writing Requirement
Both sections cross-listed with MDST 2700
Instructor: C. Brian Kelly

Development of basic writing skills, with craftsmanship the emphasis. Study, discussion and rewrite of old and new media stories. Workshop setting. Readings from texts and various other sources. Progress from short hard-news pieces through speech stories, legislative and political coverage, to use of narrative and on to features in general. Repeated writing drills. Essential to follow current events as well. Satisfies second writing requirement.

Creative Writing

ENCW 2300 Poetry Writing, section 001

530-645 MW -  BRYAN 334
Instructor: TBA

An introductory course in poetry writing, with a primary focus on creating new poems in a workshop setting. Students will study basic poetic terms and techniques and revise and arrange a series of poems for a final portfolio. The course will also have extensive outside reading and non-creative writing requirements.  While first- and second-years are the primary audience for ENWR 2300, SIS maintains two seats for third- and fourth-year students.  Enrollment procedures are detailed here: http://www.engl.virginia.edu/creativewriting-ugrads.

ENCW 2300 Poetry Writing, section 002

900-950 MWF - BRYAN 312
Instructor:
TBA

An introductory course in poetry writing, with a primary focus on creating new poems in a workshop setting. Students will study basic poetic terms and techniques and revise and arrange a series of poems for a final portfolio. The course will also have extensive outside reading and non-creative writing requirements.  While first- and second-years are the primary audience for ENWR 2300, SIS maintains two seats for third- and fourth-year students.  Enrollment procedures are detailed here: http://www.engl.virginia.edu/creativewriting-ugrads.

ENCW 2300 Poetry Writing, section 003

500-615 TR - CABELL 283
Instructor:
TBA

An introductory course in poetry writing, with a primary focus on creating new poems in a workshop setting. Students will study basic poetic terms and techniques and revise and arrange a series of poems for a final portfolio. The course will also have extensive outside reading and non-creative writing requirements.  While first- and second-years are the primary audience for ENWR 2300, SIS maintains two seats for third- and fourth-year students.  Enrollment procedures are detailed here: http://www.engl.virginia.edu/creativewriting-ugrads.

ENCW 2300 Poetry Writing, section 004

600-715 MW - CABELL 064
Instructor: TBA

An introductory course in poetry writing, with a primary focus on creating new poems in a workshop setting. Students will study basic poetic terms and techniques and revise and arrange a series of poems for a final portfolio. The course will also have extensive outside reading and non-creative writing requirements.  While first- and second-years are the primary audience for ENWR 2300, SIS maintains two seats for third- and fourth-year students.  Enrollment procedures are detailed here: http://www.engl.virginia.edu/creativewriting-ugrads.

ENCW 2300 Poetry Writing, section 005

500-615 TR - CABELL 115
Instructor:
TBA

An introductory course in poetry writing, with a primary focus on creating new poems in a workshop setting. Students will study basic poetic terms and techniques and revise and arrange a series of poems for a final portfolio. The course will also have extensive outside reading and non-creative writing requirements.  While first- and second-years are the primary audience for ENWR 2300, SIS maintains two seats for third- and fourth-year students.  Enrollment procedures are detailed here: http://www.engl.virginia.edu/creativewriting-ugrads.

ENCW 2600 Fiction Writing, section 001

1000-1050 MWF - MAURY 113
Instructor:  TBA

An introductory course in fiction writing, with a primary focus on creating short stories in a workshop setting. Students will study basic narrative terms and techniques and revise several short stories for a final portfolio. The course will also have extensive outside reading and non-creative writing requirements.  While first- and second-years are the primary audience for ENWR 2600, SIS maintains two seats for third- and fourth-year students.  Enrollment procedures are detailed here: http://www.engl.virginia.edu/creativewriting-ugrads.

ENCW 2600 Fiction Writing, section 002

500-615 TR - BRYAN 332
Instructor:  TBA

An introductory course in fiction writing, with a primary focus on creating short stories in a workshop setting. Students will study basic narrative terms and techniques and revise several short stories for a final portfolio. The course will also have extensive outside reading and non-creative writing requirements.  While first- and second-years are the primary audience for ENWR 2600, SIS maintains two seats for third- and fourth-year students.  Enrollment procedures are detailed here: http://www.engl.virginia.edu/creativewriting-ugrads.

ENCW 2600 Fiction Writing, section 003

600-715 MW - COCKE 101
Instructor:  TBA

An introductory course in fiction writing, with a primary focus on creating short stories in a workshop setting. Students will study basic narrative terms and techniques and revise several short stories for a final portfolio. The course will also have extensive outside reading and non-creative writing requirements.  While first- and second-years are the primary audience for ENWR 2600, SIS maintains two seats for third- and fourth-year students.  Enrollment procedures are detailed here: http://www.engl.virginia.edu/creativewriting-ugrads.

ENCW 2600 Fiction Writing, section 004

500-615 TR - BRYAN 310
Instructor:  
Jeremy Townley

In this intensive introduction to fiction writing, we'll develop skills to create vivid, surprising, and truthful short fiction. We’ll read about and discuss the elements of narrative craft; study numerous short stories by masters of the form; and develop our short fiction through exercises, workshops, and one-on-one conferences.

ENCW 2600 Fiction Writing, section 005

930-1045 TR - RUFFNER 123
Instructor:  TBA

An introductory course in fiction writing, with a primary focus on creating short stories in a workshop setting. Students will study basic narrative terms and techniques and revise several short stories for a final portfolio. The course will also have extensive outside reading and non-creative writing requirements.  While first- and second-years are the primary audience for ENWR 2600, SIS maintains two seats for third- and fourth-year students.  Enrollment procedures are detailed here: http://www.engl.virginia.edu/creativewriting-ugrads.

ENCW 2600 Fiction Writing, section 006

930-1045 TR - RUFFNER 125
Instructor:  TBA

An introductory course in fiction writing, with a primary focus on creating short stories in a workshop setting. Students will study basic narrative terms and techniques and revise several short stories for a final portfolio. The course will also have extensive outside reading and non-creative writing requirements.  While first- and second-years are the primary audience for ENWR 2600, SIS maintains two seats for third- and fourth-year students.  Enrollment procedures are detailed here: http://www.engl.virginia.edu/creativewriting-ugrads.

ENCW 2600 Fiction Writing, section 007

1000-1050 MWF - BRYAN 330
Instructor: Bruce Holsinger

ENCW 3310 Intermediate Poetry Writing

200-430 T - BRYAN 233
Restricted to Instructor Permission
Instructor:
Rita Dove

A weekly 2.5-hour class for students advanced beyond the level of ENWR 2300. Emphasis is on workshop of students' own poems, with focused writing exercises and written responses to relevant outside reading, as well as class discussions on issues of contemporary poetry. Final poetry portfolio required. ADMISSION BY PERMISSION OF INSTRUCTOR ONLY.

APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS:  Sample of student work (6-8 poems) to be submitted IN A SINGLE DOCUMENT (electronically in MS Word and/or a paper hard copy) NO LATER THAN 12:00 PM Noon on Monday, December 15, 2014, to Professor Dove's email address at rfd4b@virginia.edu or to her English Dept faculty mailbox in 229 Bryan Hall; EACH submission MUST include a cover sheet with name, year, email address, telephone number, major, prior workshop experience, and other workshops to which you are submitting. ALSO, cover sheet and all poems MUST be submitted in A SINGLE MS WORD document.

Every effort will be made to notify students one week prior to the beginning of classes in January, so students may finalize their schedules in SIS.

ENCW 3310 Intermediate Poetry Writing

500-730 R - BRYAN 233
Restricted to Instructor Permission
Instructor: Paul Guest

ENCW 3610 Intermediate Fiction Writing, section 001

1100-130 M - BRYAN 233
Restricted to Instructor Permission
Instructor:
Sydney Blair

Sharp focus on the reading and writing of short fiction. Students will write two stories and revise one. Written responses to weekly assignments, occasional in-class writing exercises. Active classroom participation, and love of reading and writing essential. In order to be considered for this class, you must submit a manuscript, preferably to my mailbox in 229 Bryan (up to 15 pp. is fine) by December 21s,t,, but no later than January 5th.  If you are out of town, you may e-mail me. Please attach a note saying who and what year you are, your e-mail address, what workshops you’ve taken and with whom, other workshops you’re considering, and any other relevant information.  I will alert you vis SIS a week or so before classes begin.  INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION. 

ENCW 3610 Intermediate Fiction Writing, section 002

500-730 T - DAWSON'S ROW 1
Instuctor: Elizabeth Denton

ENCW 4350 Advanced Nonfiction Writing

1100-130 R - DAWSON'S ROW 1
Instructor: Jane Alison

An advanced class for ambitious students who want to study ways of crafting literary nonfiction that focuses upon journeys, both internal and external. We’ll examine how other writers have taken their senses, scientific minds, beliefs, and literary bloodlines upon ventures into unknown parts, including deep inside themselves or even others’ bodies. We’ll study technical aspects of converting observation, speculative thinking, fact, and not-quite-fact into living, compelling narrative—how to contract and expand time, organize structure, shift among inner and outer worlds, create spaces, control questions and tensions—so that you can develop skills and craft your own exploratory pieces. The class will revolve around your writing and texts that might include works of Eula Biss, Anne Carson, John D’Agata, Charles Darwin, Annie Dillard, Daniel Mendelsohn, Caryl Phillips, and Richard Selzer. INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION REQUIRED: please send a writing sample and cover note to jas2ad@virginia.edu.

ENCW 4810 Advanced Fiction Writing

500-730 R- DAWSON'S ROW 1
Restricted to Instructor Permission
Instructor: Elizabeth Denton

An advanced class for ambitious students who want to explore ways of crafting literary fiction. We’ll examine how writers have worked within the long story's more leisurely scope—contracting and expanding time, organizing structure, shifting among points of view, creating spaces, controlling tensions, crystalizing characters—so that you can develop skills and craft your own stories, long or short. The class will revolve around your writing and published texts that may include works of Alice Munro, Lorrie Moore, Edward P. Jones, Zadie Smith, Wells Tower, Gina Berriault, George Saunders and others.  By the end of the term, you should have either two 15 page (or so) stories or a 35 (or so) page story. 

To be considered for this class, please send a short story (up to 15 pages), no later than one week before classes begin, to me at ed3m@virginia.edu.  Attach a note telling me who and what year you are, your email address, what workshops you’ve taken and with whom, and whether you’re applying to other workshops. I will alert you through SIS a week or so before classes begin.  INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION (which means you must submit work to be considered—see above).

ENCW 4830 Advanced Poetry Writing 

1100-130 R - CONTACT DEPARTMENT
Instructor: Lisa Russ Spaar

This is a workshop for serious makers of poems.  Admission is by instructor permission only.  Students interested in the course must submit 5 to 7 poems to the professor by hard copy or e-mail no later than 15 December.  Please accompany the poetry sample with a brief note, detailing prior writing experience/coursework/instructors, and giving a good working e-mail address as well.  STUDENTS SHOULD ALSO REQUEST PERMISSION TO ENROLL THROUGH SIS.

 Students should also indicate whether or not they are submitting to other workshops, as well.

In this workshop for advanced poets, the aim of our collective project will be to generate poems that dare to embody, explore, provoke, illuminate, refute, and manifest “large” traditional poetic themes--Eros, Thanatos, Truth, Beauty, God, & Time--in fresh, original ways.  In addition to writing about a poem a week, students will also be responsible for choosing a trio of “core poets” to read closely throughout the semester:   one poet born before 1920, one poet born after 1970, and a poet on the faculty of the University of Virginia.  We will be incorporating these readings into our assignments, poems, and class discussion.

ENCW 5310 Advanced Poetry Writing

200-430 R - CABELL 036
Instructor: Debra Nystrom

A writing workshop focused on student poems and assigned reading for craft discussion.  Along with a semester portfolio of poems, students will write a few short prose pieces on poetry, and will offer one in-class presentation.  Permission of the instructor is required before registering.  To apply, submit 4-5 poems at least two weeks before classes begin to Ms. Nystrom’s mailbox in 219 Bryan Hall (include your name, email address, phone, year and your previous writing course information).   To mail a submission, send it to Debra Nystrom, Dept. of English, P.O. Box 400121, UVA, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4121, or email DLN8U@virginia.edu

ENCW 5610 Advanced Fiction Writing

200-430 T - DAWSON'S ROW 1
Instructor: Sydney Blair

This workshop is designed for students who have had some previous experience in -- and who feel passionate about -- the reading and writing of fiction. We will read stories by published writers to learn how and why they make the choices they do when it comes to point of view, character development, plot considerations, pacing, to name a few, and students will write two stories (or an equivalent fiction project) by the end of the semester, revising one story (or part of a longer piece).  Classroom participation is a must.  To be considered for this class, you must submit a manuscript, preferably to my mailbox in 229 Bryan (up to 15 pp. is fine) by December 21s,t,, but no later than January 5th.  If you are out of town, you may e-mail me. Please attach a note saying who and what year you are, your e-mail address, what workshops you’ve taken and with whom, other workshops you’re considering, and any other relevant information.  I will alert you vis SIS a week or so before classes begin.  INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION

Literary Prose

ENLP 4550 Topics in Literary Prose: Forms of Life Writing

1100-130 T - LOCATION TBA
Instructor: Jane Alison

How do memoirists find shapes in the flows of life? How do they choose the moments and images that reveal patterns—repetitive ripples, enormous gyres—that in turn give sense and meaning to experience? How do they create the “I” that will see and translate what’s seen, and how do they know what is “true” and find ways to render it meaningfully? These and other questions of persona, shape, and time will engage us in this class, which will focus upon forms of memoiristic writing but will also consider hybrids in which writers hunt or imagine the lives of others. Readings might include works of Alison Bechdel, Sven Birkert, Vivian Gornick, Jamaica Kincaid, Maggie Nelson, Michael Ondaatje, W. G. Sebald, Justin Torres, Tobias Wolff, and Geoffrey Wolff. In addition to weekly readings, you will explore techniques and strategies through a sequence of workshopped writing exercises: a love of reading and writing is crucial. INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION REQUIRED: please send a writing sample an  d cover note to jas2ad@virginia.edu.

Poetry Writing Program

ENPW 4820 Poetry Program Poetics: Taking Shape: The Interplay of Image, Drama, Music and Syntax in Making Poems

1100-130 T - BRYAN 233
Restricted to Instructor Permission
Instructor: Debra Nystrom

A seminar class for advanced poetry writing students, focusing on questions of how the elements of poetry interact to make a whole whose effects are registered in multiple ways at once.  We’ll read very closely poems from various periods, places and styles, and essays on poetry as well.  Students will write both poems and essays, and will participate in group presentations examining carefully the shapes made by particular poems.  For instructions on permission to register email DLN8U@virginia.edu.  

ENPW 4920 Poetry Capstone

Time/Location TBA
Restricted to Instructor Permission
Instructor: Lisa Russ Spaar

This is the second part of a two-semester project [The Capstone Course (ENPW 4910/4920)] designed for fourth-year students in the Department’s Area Program in Poetry Writing.  The Capstone project is a year-long investigation of faculty and student-directed, shared texts that allows advanced poetry writing students to read widely and across disciplines in areas of individual aesthetic interest, to begin to think beyond the single poem and into ways poetry manuscripts can be organized, to become more deeply aware of their own patterns and evolving aesthetic, and to create new work.  The spring semester involves a combination of weekly discussion of individual student manuscripts and one-on-one conferring with the instructor.  After mid-term, students are assigned a graduate student mentor, who also offers the poetry manuscript a close reading.  The course culminates in the production by each student of a manuscript of original poetry.

Medieval Literature

ENMD 3110 Medieval European Literature in Translation: Illicit Love

200-315 TR - BRYAN 235
Instructor: A.C. Spearing

Love is one of the most important themes of medieval European literature, and when the love is illicit it’s at its most emotionally intense and morally problematic. In this course, after some introductory readings in love stories from ancient Rome and in troubadour lyrics, we shall read a variety of medieval narratives of adulterous and otherwise forbidden love, translated from medieval English, French, Italian and German, including tales of famous pairs of lovers such as Tristan and Iseult, Lancelot and Guinevere, and Troilus and Criseyde. Requirements: two papers, a mid-term, and a final exam.

ENMD 3260 Chaucer

1100-1215 TR - BRYAN 328
Instructor: Elizabeth Fowler

This is a course on Geoffrey Chaucer’s four dream poems together with bits of some poems he had read and some others that his poems engendered; it’s a good course for beginners and for Chaucer adepts alike.  The Book of the Duchess, The House of Fame, The Parliament of Fowls, and The Legend of Good Women are surreal, sweet, funny, philosophical, emotionally intense, and visually overstimulated poems which are even more interesting in our age of complex virtual reality; dreams seem to provide Chaucer with a way of thinking about what it is to have the out-of-body experience of reading.  Here you will learn to “explicate” short passages of text — that means to describe rather technically how words, images, genre, tropes, figures of speech and so forth work to produce the effects we call meaning.  Thus, this is a “close reading” course as well as a Chaucer course.  We will also talk about his other ambitions — philosophical, political, theological, aesthetic, imagistic.  Two short papers, two in-class exams, perhaps a few quizzes.  (It’s fine to take this if you’ve already had ENMD 3250, but no previous Chaucer is required.)

ENMD 4500 Advanced Studies in Medieval Literature 

1100-1150 MWF - BRYAN 330
Instructor: Bruce Holsinger

ENMD 5020 Beowulf

1230-145 TR - COCKE 101
Instructor: Peter Baker

Renaissance Literature

ENRN 3220 Shakespeare, section 001

1100-1150 MW - MINOR 125
Instructor: Katharine Maus

ENRN 3250 Milton

1230-145 TR - MAURY 113
Instructor: Daniel Kinney

Study of selected poetry and prose, from Comus and Areopagitica to the late masterpieces, with particular emphasis on Paradise Lost.  Class requirements: regular participation including brief email responses, one short and one longer paper, and a final exam.

ENRN 4500 Advanced Studies in Renaissance Literature 

330-445 TR - BRYAN 330
Instructor: Stephen Hequembourg

ENRN 4500 Advanced Studies in Renaissance Literature

110-1150 MWF - BRYAN 330
Instructor: Bruce Holsinger

ENRN 4530 Metamorphic Poetics: Transformations of Classical Myth

1100-1215 TR - BRYAN 332
Instructor: Clare Kinney

This seminar will look at the ways in which Renaissance (and some medieval)  writers appropriated, revised and subverted the fascinating narratives of pagan antiquity.  Modern readers sometimes declare that 16th and 17th century poets are “just showing off their classical education” when they make allusions to mythological material; in this course I hope to complicate that point of view.  We’ll explore the finer nuances of the dialogue between Renaissance poets and some of their epic predecessors, and discuss the ways in which pagan myth is variously “kidnaped” and refashioned to serve different poetic agendas.  We will start by reading (in translation) Virgil’s imperial epic, the Aeneid, as well as Ovid’s influential and bewitching tapestry of mythic narratives, the Metamorphoses.  After a glance at some medieval mythography (including that of Christine de Pisan) and some Chaucerian myth-making, the second half of the course will focus on transformations of Virgilian and Ovidian material in works by Shakespeare, Christopher Marlowe, Edmund Spenser, John Milton and their contemporaries.

Course requirements: regular attendance and energetic participation in discussion.  A series of  e-mail responses to the readings from Virgil and Ovid.  A 7 page paper, a longer  term paper, final examination.

Restoration and Eighteenth Century Literature

ENEC 3400 Restoration and Eighteenth Century Drama: The Immorality and Profaneness of the English Stage

500-615 MW - BRYAN 235
Instructor: Brad Pasanek

This course is an introduction to English drama's passing show and takes its title from an invective written against the theater of the period surveyed. So, beware. The plays we read are both funny and disturbing: they will test our wit and may corrode our moral fiber.  We’ll take a span of time that falls into two moments: a libertine subversive moment and its hangover. We read mostly comedy but sample tragedy and farce. Before the semester ends we make acquaintance with a rout of artificial characters (Colonel Careless, Sir Witwoud, Sir Fopling Flutter, Charles Surface; Angellica Bianca, Mrs. Lovely, Mrs. Loveit, Mrs. Wishfort). We’ll talk celebrity, censorship, and satire as we probe the goings-on behind the scenes and look out on the wider theater of history. Drivers wanted for trips to Staunton to see "The Rover" and "A Bold Stroke for a Wife." Course readings to be assigned from the concise edition of "The Broadview Anthology of Restoration and Early Eighteenth-Century Drama." Our authors will likely be Wycherley, Dryden, Behn, Vanbrugh, Congreve, Rowe, Gay, Goldsmith, and Sheridan. Assignments include two papers, a memorization assignment, a web video (xtranormal or live action), and a final exam..

ENEC 3600 The English Novel

200-315 MW - BRYAN 235
Instructor: Cynthia Wall

The eighteenth century was very interested in the private lives of ordinary people; that’s why, in a way, it invented the novel.  One fictional heroine, perennially embarrassed, insists: “there ought to be a book, of the laws and customs à-la-mode, presented to all young people, upon their first introduction into public company.”  The novel as a genre was meant to be such a guide, to teach “the young, the ignorant, and the idle” how to be fine, upstanding young men and women.  So why did most eighteenth-century novels so scandalize the Victorians in the next century?  Perhaps because they spent much too much time exploring the details of sexuality and scandal in order to configure chasteness and propriety.  So will we, reading prose narratives and novels from John Bunyan, Eliza Haywood, Daniel Defoe, Samuel Richardson, Henry Fielding, Francis Coventry (the life of a lapdog!), Frances Burney, and the naughty Matthew Lewis.

ENEC 4500 A Global Eighteenth Century

330-445 MW - CABELL 287
Instructor: John O'Brien

Nineteenth Century British Literature

ENNC 3500 Nineteenth Century Topics: Victorian Women Writers

1100-1215 TR - DELL 2, 101
Instructor: Ann Mazur

“Women are supposed to be very calm generally: but women feel just as men feel; they need exercise for their faculties and a field for their efforts as much as their brothers do; they suffer from too rigid a restraint, too absolute a stagnation, precisely as men would suffer; and it is narrow-minded in their more privileged fellow-creatures to say that they ought to confine themselves to making puddings and knitting stockings, to playing on the piano and embroidering bags. It is thoughtless to condemn them, or laugh at them, if they seek to do more or learn more than custom has pronounced necessary for their sex.” – Jane Eyre, Charlotte Brontë.

This course will survey women’s writing of the Victorian era (1837-1900), including canonical favorites such as the Brontës, George Eliot, and Elizabeth Gaskell, in addition to currently lesser known writers such as Augusta Webster and Florence Bell. Women writers were among those impacted by the incredible surge in literary production during the Victorian period.  More than ever before, women from all social classes were publishing their writing in a wide variety of genres—from novels to poetry, dramas to essays.  Throughout the semester, we will study women’s writing in relationship to important nineteenth-century debates about gender. Along the way, we will consider questions such as: Are women writers constrained by the conventions of the marriage plot? How does a particular text work with or against the image of a woman as “Angel in the House”?  Do certain genres provide more opportunity for women writers?  Expect to read a variety of women’s work from sonnets to the gothic to scandalous sensation fiction.

ENNC 4500 Advanced Studies in Nineteenth Century Literature: Word Magic

200-315 MW - BRYAN 328
Instructor: Herbert Tucker

Now you see it, and (presto!) now you don’t.  Magic envy is a condition from which for a long time authors have suffered – and also profited, conjuring up a verbal glamour whose essential modern task has been working wonder into the fabric of the ordinary.  Shakespeare’s Tempest and Milton’s Comus will set our stage. Next we’ll see how the Enlightenment assault on magic left poetry to pick up the pieces of a broken world (Collins, Mozart) and undertake its Romantic re-enchantment (Burns, Scott, Coleridge, Goethe, Shelley, Keats); then how Victorian narratives spirited magic onto increasingly psychological and anthropological terrain (Browning, Tennyson; Bulwer-Lytton, Stevenson; Twain, Chesnutt).  Lastly students will team up to show each other what a 20th-century writer managed to extract from the not quite exhausted hat, treating magical fictions by the likes of Bulgakov, Le Guin, Pullman. (Sorry, no Harry Potter.)  The alchemy of group discussion will refine individual endeavors, through shorter papers, towards pure gold in the form of a substantially researched critical essay.

Modern and Contemporary Literature

ENMC 3500 Studies in Modern and Contemporary Literature: Jungle Stories

930-1045 TR - CABELL 485
Instructor: Mrinalini Chakravorty

"Midway upon the journey of our life,/ I found myself within a forest dark,
/ For the straight forward pathway had been lost"—so begins Dante’s Inferno.  This course will consider how the "jungle imaginary" has shaped ideas of civilization and culture by engaging with novels (and on occasion poetry and drama) that represent human relation to natural landscapes, both wild and tamed.  Our exploration of works by Kipling, Orwell, Wells, Thoreau, Woolf, Lawrence, Ghosh, Devi, Sinha and others will reveal astonishing ideas about the jungle as the horizon through which boundaries between the human and animal, the colonial/modern and the savage/primitive, civil society and unruly nature, built and chaotic environments, as well as security and danger are maintained.  We will also consider how woods and forests figure alternate ecologies of life that encapsulate utopian ideas of the commons, of sustenance and renewal, and notions of ecological justice and species equity, that are at odds with the surely apocalyptic outcomes of environmental catastrophe predicted by global warming, unfettered development, and resource depletion.  Alongside a variety of literary texts across time periods that delineate the fear, romance, and potentialities that jungles evoke, we will read materials on colonization, exploration and conquest, eco-criticism, and globalization.

This course is designed for advancing students in the major. Papers, short responses, and presentations will emphasize skills in argumentation, close reading, literary analysis, and critical thinking. Enthusiastic class participation is mandatory.

ENMC 3500 Studies in Modern and Contemporary Literature: Modernist Fiction Into Film

1000-1050 MWF - CABELL 032
Instructor: Victor Luftig

We’ll read some great Modernist novels and stories and view film adaptations of them, considering how stylistic elements of the fiction serve the films’ consideration of political and social issues: the course’s central question is whether the distinctive ways the fiction was written are an aid to, a barrier to, or irrelevant to the way the films have responded to urgent matters in their own times.  We’ll begin with some famous short stories, such as Conrad’s “Heart of Darkness,” Joyce’s “The Dead,” and Faulkner’s “Barn Burning,” that were made into films just before and during the Reagan era (Apocalypse Now, John Huston’s film of the Joyce story, and the American Short Story film series’ adaptation of the Faulkner) before considering Forster’s novel A Passage to India and David Lean’s film of that novel (and in particular its treatment of race).  We will then move ahead to works adapted in the 1990s in films that foregrounded gender issues (including the short story “Guests of the Nation,” in relation to The Crying Game, and a Virginia Woolf novel)—one of these will serve as the subject for the course’s first of two short papers--before turning back to novels made into films in the 1960s (such as DH Lawrence’s Women in Love) and concluding with texts made into films in the last decade, such as Their Eyes Were Watching God, The Great Gatsby, and As I Lay Dying.  Though we’ll discuss at least one film in relation to each fictional work we read, and though we’ll spend some time in class looking at clips from those films, this is not a course about film; it’s a course that treats film as a way of thinking about what use can be made of the stories’ remarkable techniques.  No prior familiarity with any of the stories or films is necessary.

ENMC 3500 Studies in Modern and Contemporary Literature: Currents in African Literature

330-445 TR - MAURY 113
Instructor: Njelle Hamilton

What is the state of literatures from the African continent today? In this course, we will read a sampling of some of the exciting new works of fiction, poetry, and drama, from the continent’s young and established authors. This semester our theme will be “Re-Dreaming the Modern African Nation State,” and authors will include: Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, and Teju Cole (Nigeria); Maaza Mengiste and Dinaw Mengistu (Ethiopia); Aminatta Forna (Sierra Leone); Nuruddin Farah (Somalia); and J.M. Coetzee (South Africa). We will examine the literary innovations that writers use to narrate nations in continued turmoil, as we discuss issues such as dictatorship, the lingering effects of colonization, the postcolonial nation state, the traumas of war and geo-politics, religion, gender and sexuality, and migration, among others. Requirements include: short literary reviews, African news forum posts, a historical presentation (in pairs), and a final essay.

ENMC 3800 Concepts of the Modern: Nietzsche and Modern Literature

1230-145 TR - BRYAN 328
Instructor: Jessica Feldman

In order to understand the notion of modernity during the late 19th and 20th centuries, we’ll study the writing of Friedrich Nietzsche, a philosopher who wrote in literary  ways—dramatic, poetic, fictional.   We’ll also read works by Franz Kafka, William Butler Yeats, Oscar Wilde, James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, and Vladimir Nabokov, considering them in light of Nietzsche’s methods and ideas.  Nietzsche and these writers wondered about such questions as: What is an ethical life? How does religion function?  How do we know what we know? How do people communicate with one another?  In a world filled with what we might summarize as "bad behavior," what are the roles of art and beauty? This is a lecture and discussion course.

ENMC 4500 Advanced Studies in Modern and Contemporary Literature: The Contemporary Anglophone Novel

330-445 MW - BRYAN 330
Instructor: Stephen Arata

ENMC 4500 Advanced Studies in Modern and Contemporary Literature: Contemporary Poetry

330-445 MW - BRYAN 334
Instructor:
Jahan Ramazani

In this seminar we will explore contemporary American poetry. Our aim will be to understand the array of postwar idioms, forms, and movements, whether the poetry is written in inherited forms, free verse, or avant-garde styles. We will work to appreciate the primary achievements and vociferous debates in contemporary poetry. We will ask how recent poets have responded to literary modernism, other art forms, other discourses, globalization, changing gender relations, the environment, and social and political movements. While devoting much of our attention to some of the most influential poetry from the second half of the twentieth century, we will also bring ourselves up to date by examining some of the best poems published in recent years. Among requirements are active participation; reading quizzes; co-leading of discussion, including your framing of discussion questions; and two 8-10 page papers. Our texts will be from Contemporary Poetry, volume 2 of The Norton Anthology of Modern and Contemporary Poetry, third edition, as supplemented by recently published poems.

ENMC 4500 Advanced Studies in Modern and Contemporary Literature:  Multiethnic American Fiction

1100-1215 TR - BRYAN 330
Instructor: 
Caroline Rody

This course will examine contemporary fiction by American authors of many backgrounds, observing the transformation of traditional literary form, discourse, plot, and character in an era of global migration; cultural and linguistic multiplicity; changing understandings of race, gender, and national affiliation; and rising interest in both ethnic histories and possibilities for cross-ethnic encounter.  Secondary material will include critical and theoretical essays on such dynamics.  Primary texts will include novels and stories by some of the following writers:  Carlos Bulosan, Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin, Grace Paley, Alfred Kazin, Lore Segal, Toni Morrison, Maxine Hong Kingston, Louise Erdrich, Sandra Cisneros, Bharati Mukherjee, Jhumpa Lahiri, Chang-rae Lee, Gish Jen, Edwidge Danticat, Karen Tei Yamashita, Nicole Krauss, Junot Diaz, Teju Cole. Requirements: active reading and participation, short response papers, 2 major papers, class leading (in pairs).

ENMC 4500 Advanced Studies in Modern and Contemporary Literature: Marley, Marcus, and MacKay - From Jamaica to the World

500-800 M - GIBSON 241
Instructor: Njelle Hamilton

This seminar will examine the lives, works, and impact of three internationalist Jamaicans — Marcus Garvey (essays), Bob Marley (songs), and Claude McKay (fiction and poetry) — who have influenced not only Jamaican thought, but also writers and thinkers of the wider African Diaspora. Reading these writers, thinkers, and cultural icons in tandem, and alongside essays on Garveyism, the New Negro, the Harlem Renaissance, Pan-Africanism, Rastafarianism, and reggae music, we will consider not only how they influenced both each other and a developing postcolonial Jamaican black nationalism, but also the extent to which their writings and worldview are simultaneously fundamentally Jamaican, and fundamentally diasporic and universalist. Requirements include short literary reviews, a music analysis paper, discussion leading, and a substantive seminar paper.

ENMC 4530 Seminar in Modern Studies: The Global City: New York, Los Angeles, London and more

930-1045 TR - BRYAN 332
Instructor: Sandhya Shukla

This course explores the representation and social life of the global city.  We look at cities that have been made by flows -- of people, capital and ideas -- and that function more as global, rather than national, or regional spaces.  And we explore how key historical experiences, of war, colonialism, capitalism, and migration have shaped what we think of as modern (and postmodern) urban formations.  We consider cultural exchange as a major theme of novels, movies, art and music, and also interrogate the class, racial and ethnic stratification that effectively challenges any simple notion of community.  With a rigorous interdisciplinary approach, we ask questions about form, of both the texts and the cities themselves. Materials to be considered may include: novels like Italo Calvino’s Invisible Cities, Don Delillo’s Falling Man, Teju Cole’s Open City, Monica Ali’s Brick Lane, Karen Tei Yamashita’s Tropic of Orange, and Salman Rushdie’s Satanic Verses; films such as Saturday Night Fever, Manhattan, The Naked City, West Side Story, Dirty Pretty Things, and Blade Runner; and theoretical works by David Harvey, Michel de Certeau and Saskia Sassen.

American Literature

ENAM 3140 African-American Literature

800-915 TR - BRYAN 328
Instructor: Lisa Woolfork

This course concentrates on twentieth and twenty-first century African American novels, short stories, and prose essays. This lecture and participation based class will address literature from pivotal cultural and political moments in African American life, such as the Harlem Renaissance and the Black Arts Movement. Writers include, but are not limited to, Zora Neale Hurston, Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, James Baldwin, Octavia Butler, and Martha Southgate. Mandatory assignments include weekly responses, quizzes, midterm and final exams.

ENAM 3180 Introduction to Asian-American Studies

1100-1215 TR - CABELL 489
Instructor: Sylvia Chong

The historical experiences of Asian Americans—a broad, panethnic category inclusive of Americans with roots in the Philippines, China, Taiwan, Japan, North and South Korea, Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia, India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and more—shed light on issues of immigration, citizenship, education, war, labor, and assimilation which have affected all Americans to differing degrees. This "multi-media" cultural history will draw heavily on American visual and popular culture to situate, visualize, and define Asian Americans at various historical moments against and alongside African Americans, Native Americans, Latinos, and white Americans. Some of these moments involve intense conflict and division, while others gesture towards camaraderie and affiliation. This class will be neither a simplistic celebration of ethnic pride and diversity, nor a condemnation of American history as singularly oppressive, although we will acknowledge both these strands. Rather, the eclectic materials of this class will replicate the heterogeneous history and make-up of Asian America, and establish Asian America as a relationship with itself and with America, rather than a “thing” to isolate and analyze.

This is an introductory course that assumes no prior knowledge of American Studies or Asian American history. During the semester, we will concentrate on developing close reading skills for visual, cinematic and textual materials that may prove useful to future courses you might take in American Studies, History, English or Media Studies. We will engage with a number of primary texts from various genres, spanning the mid-19th century to contemporary times. Our readings will include political cartoons, graphic novels, documentary films, fictional films, and musicals. While obviously not an exhaustive overview of Asian Americans in American cultural history, we will try to touch upon a diverse range of historical moments and cultural and political issues, so as to gain insight into the interconnectedness of multi-ethnic America.

ENAM 3500 Studies in American Literature: Contemporary U.S. Novels

330-445 TR - BRYAN 235
Instructor:  Victoria Olwell

ENAM 3500 Studies in American Literature: American Literature and Law

LECTURE: 1100-1150 MW - MAURY 110
Instructor: Stephen Railton

DISCUSSION SECTIONS:
330-420 R - CABELL 032
430-520 R - CABELL 032

We'll start with a number of 19th century fictions (Cooper, Hawthorne, Melville, Twain) and then end with a slightly larger number of 20th century fictions, including some by best selling authors like Gardner and Turow, but also canonical works by writers like Faulkner, Wright and Lee.  All of them engage deeply with the way the "law" -- as an ethical, linguistic, semantic system -- determines or creates "reality." One persistent theme, of the course and of many of the books we'll read, is how both the law and the novels tell stories, construct narratives, create order, achieve or at least seek meaning and resolution.

ENAM 4500 Advanced Studies in American Literature: Literature of the Americas

1100-1215 TR - BRYAN 312
Instructor: Anna Brickhouse

This course course will introduce students to the so-called transnational turn in American studies by exploring a wide range of (broadly defined) fictions from and about the Americas, from writings by Columbus and the conquistadors through modern and contemporary novels, novellas, and short stories. Topics will include New world “discovery” and conquest; borderlands and contact zones; slavery and revolution; and the haunting of the global present by the colonial past. One goal of the syllabus is to encourage readings and interpretations that operate at the intersection of fiction and history, using literary analysis to limn aspects of the hemispheric American past that historicism alone cannot. But students should feel free to use the course to develop their own questions, problems, and interests as well.

ENAM 4500 Advanced Studies in American Literature:  Voices of the Civil War

330-600 R - CABELL 415
Instructor: Stephen Cushman and Gary Gallagher

Taught by Stephen Cushman and Gary Gallagher, this course explores major themes relating to the American Civil War through the words of individuals who experienced it. Using wartime and postwar writings, fiction and nonfiction, as well as photography and film, students will focus on why the war came; how it evolved from a struggle for Union to one for Union and freedom; how the conflict affected civilians; why soldiers fought; and how participants on each side chose to remember the conflict. The “voices” in the course will include men and women, white and black, military and nonmilitary, and Union and Confederate. Among the writers the syllabus is likely to include are Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant, Ambrose Bierce, Kate Stone, Robert Gould Shaw, Sam Watkins, Edward Porter Alexander, Phoebe Yates Pember, Robert Garlick Hill Kane, Walt Whitman, Louisa May Alcott, and African Americans engaged in the process of emancipation. The reading load is not light, and there will be 20 pages of required written work. Regular attendance and significant participation in class discussion are essential. Students must secure instructor’s permission to enroll.

ENAM 4500 Advanced Studies in American Literature: Fictions of Black Identity

930-1045 TR - NAU 242
Instructor: Lisa Woolfork

This advanced undergraduate seminar will explore the dual meaning of its title “Fictions of Black Identity.” The first implication suggests the literary inventions (novels, essays, critical works) that address the meanings of blackness in an American context. The second meaning is heavily invested in the first: that Black identity is a fiction, not necessarily in the sense of falsity, but in its highly mediated, flexible, and variable condition. Questions to consider include:  how does one make and measure Black identity? Can one be phenotypically White and still be Black? What is the value of racial masquerade? What does it mean to be legitimately Black? Readings include, but are not limited to, Percival Everett’s Erasure, Rebecca Walker’s Black, White, and Jewish, Paul Beatty’s White Boy Shuffle, and a range of critical essays. Mandatory assignments include leading class discussion, midterm project and seminar paper. This class is designed for students majoring in English, African American Studies, and/or American Studies.

ENAM 4500 Advanced Studies in American Literature: Modern Love in the U.S.

1230-145 TR - NAU 142
Instructor: Victoria Olwell

Genre Studies

No undergraduate courses taught in this genre during the Spring 2015 semester.

English Language Studies

No undergraduate courses taught in this genre during the Spring 2015 semester.

Criticism

ENCR 3400 Theories of Reading

330-445 MW - BRYAN 328
Instructor: Rita Felski

How and why do we read? And what is the relationship between academic reading and the kind of reading we do for pleasure? This course is divided into two parts. The first part, on critical reading, surveys some influential forms of critical interpretation, including structuralism, Marxism, psychoanalysis, deconstruction, feminism, postcolonialism and queer theory.  In the second half, we will explore everyday experiences of reading that are either ignored or treated with suspicion in literary theory:  identification and recognition; empathy; enchantment and self-loss; horror and shock; fandom and the pleasure of collective reading. The goal of the course is to explore the similarities and differences between reading inside and outside the classroom and to examine the emotional as well as intellectual dimensions of interpretation.

ENCR 3559 Contemporary Disability Theory

200-315 MW - CABELL 411
Instructor: Christopher Krentz

How have disabled people been represented and what do those representations reveal?  This course will provide an introduction to disability studies, an interdisciplinary field that over the last few decades has approached disability largely from a non-medical perspective.  We’ll start by reading such theorists as Erving Goffman, Rosemarie Garland Thomson, and Tobin Siebers to see how the discourse over disability has evolved over the last fifty years.  Then we will apply these critical ideas to works that may include: Helen Keller, The Story of My Life; Carson McCullers, The Heart is a Lonely Hunter; Ken Kesey, One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest; J. M. Coetzee, Waiting for the Barbarians; Katherine Dunn, Geek Love; Indra Sinha, Animal’s People; and probably at least one film.  Along the way, I expect we will discuss issues of representation, stigma, access, civil rights, activism, institutionalization, identity politics, bioethics, and conceptions of the human.

ENCR 4500 Advanced Studies in Literary Criticism: Feminist Theory

200-315 TR - BRYAN 330
Instructor: Susan Fraiman

An introduction to American feminist criticism and theory.  This course pairs novels and other works by women with critical and theoretical essays in order to contrast diverse feminist approaches. I expect to explore such themes as mother-daughter relations, the “male gaze,” mobility and migration, incarceration/escape, and conflicts/commonalities among women.  We will also broach such theoretical issues as how to periodize the development of feminist theory, the contributions of queer theory, the logic of canon formation, the meanings of third-wave feminism, and the way gender intersects with other axes of identity (race, sexuality, disability, class, etc.).  Possible primary texts (still tentative) include Jane Eyre (1847), Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (1861), The Well of Loneliness (1928), Mona in the Promised Land (1997), a contemporary film, graphic narrative, and popular romance.  Probable theorists include Laura Mulvey, Eve Sedgwick, Susan Stanford Friedman, Chandra Mohanty, and Judith Butler, among many others.  Students should be prepared for some challenging materials and a fairly heavy reading load.  5-page paper, 10-page paper, and a final exam.

ENCR 4500 Advanced Studies in Literary Criticism: Race in American Places

630-900 M - GIBSON 142
Instructor: Ian Grandison

This interdisciplinary seminar uses the method of Critical Landscape Analysis to explore how everyday places and spaces, “landscapes,” are involved in the negotiation of power in American society.  Landscapes, as we engage the idea, may encompass seemingly private spaces (within the walls of a suburban bungalow or of a government subsidized apartment) to seemingly public spaces (the vest pocket park in lower Manhattan where the Occupy Movement was launched in September 2011; the Downtown Mall, with its many privately operated outdoor cafés, that occupy the path along which East Main Street once flowed freely in Charlottesville; or even the space of invisible AM and FM radio waves that the FCC supposedly regulates in the public’s interest).  We launch our exploration by considering landscapes as arenas of the Culture Wars.  With this context, we unearth ways in which places are planned, designed, constructed, and mythologized in the struggle to assert and enforce social (especially racial) distinctions, difference, and hierarchy.  You will be moved to understand how publicly financed freeways were planned not only to facilitate some citizens’ modern progress, but also to block others from  accessing rights, protections, and opportunities to which casually we believe all "Americans" are entitled.  We study landscapes not only as represented in written and non-written forms, but also through direct sensory, emotional, and intellectual experience during two mandatory field trips to places in our region.  In addition to informal group exercises and individual mid-term exam, critical field trip reflection paper, and final exam, you are required to complete in small groups a final research project on a topic you choose that relates to the seminar.  Past topics have ranged from the racial politics of farmers’ markets in gentrifying inner cities to the gender--and the transgender exclusion—politics of  universal standards for public restroom pictograms.  Students showcase such results in an informal symposium that culminates the semester.  Not only will you expand the complexity and scope of your critical thinking abilities, but also you will never again experience as ordinary the spaces and places you encounter from day to day.

Special Topics in Literature

ENSP 3300 Literary Editing

930-1045 TR - GIBSON 142
Instructor: Jeb Livingood

Students will learn the fundamentals of editing, typesetting, and publishing literary works in today’s dynamic environment. Students will study basic book design principles, review editing techniques and the Chicago Manual of Style, typeset a book-length project using Adobe InDesign software, and publish their projects in print and ePub formats. Students must bring a laptop to class with current InDesign software installed. In addition to textbooks, most students can expect software fees of approximately $20/month, and final printing fees of $15 or more depending on project complexity.

ENSP 4500 Advanced Studies in Special Topics in Literature 

200-315 TR - BRYAN 312
Instructor: Jennifer Wicke

ENSP 4559 Writers in Paris

200-430 R - BRYAN 332
Instructor: Sydney Blair

 

ENSP 4800 The Bible

200-315 M - MAURY 110
Instructor:  Stephen Cushman

The goal of this course is simple: to sample a range of stories and poems in the Bible, from Genesis to Revelation, so that readers and writers of English can recognize and appreciate allusions to them or echoes of them in other contexts, whether artistic or not.  No prior knowledge of the Bible needed or assumed.  All are welcome, as are all points of view, religious and secular.  Participants may choose to submit analytic work or creative work.

ENSP 5559 New Course in Special Topics in Literature

200-315 MW - BRYAN 328
Instructors: Alison Booth and Brad Pasanek

ENSP 5820 Advanced Special Topics in Literature

TBA
Restricted to Instructor Permission
Instructors: Michael Levenson and Claire Kinney

"The Culture of London: Past and Present" offers an interdisciplinary approach to metropolitan culture, as an historically embedded object of inquiry. Located in London, it runs for a month each year from early June to early July. Faculty members from the University direct, teach and lead the class; they are complemented by London-based specialists in architecture, art history, religious studies and contemporary politics.

 

ENSP 5830 Literature and Film

1100-1215 TR - BRYAN 310
Restricted to 4th-Years, Graduate Students, Instructor Permission
Instructor: Walter Korte

Beginning with the proposition that there exist uniquely cinematic elements of meaning and structure, the course lays the foundation for "visual thinking" in film--a sensitivity to the aesthetic elements intrinsic to the cinema. The course examines structure, modes of expression and varieties of visual coherence in narrative film. Weekly film screenings (7:00 p.m. Sunday), informal response papers, final examination, final paper (15 pages). Texts: Braudy, Cohen Film Theory and Criticism anthology (Sixth Edition), Lehman: Defining Cinema; selected essays.

Required screenings are on Sunday evenings at 7:00.

Requirements: Regular attendance and active participation; short informal response papers; final exam and paper. The course has a weekly two hour screening session.

Related Courses in Other Departments

CPLT 2020 History of European Literature

200-315 TR - RUFFNER G008
Instructor: Walter Jost
Cross-listed with ENGL 2010

This 4-credit course surveys European literature from its origins in Ancient Greece and Rome into the European Renaissance.  As a course in literary history, it seeks to develop an understanding of period concepts, such as Republican Rome, Medieval and Renaissance, as well as concepts of genre, such as epic, tragedy, and comedy.  Readings, sometimes in the form of selections, include: Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey, Sophocles’ Oedipus Rex and Euripides’ The Bacchae, Virgil’s Aeneid, Ariosto’s Orlando Furioso, the Inferno from Dante’s Divine Comedy, several of Montaigne’s Essays, Hamlet, and Don Quixote. All foreign language works will be read in English translation.  Requirements: three papers and a final examination.  There are two lectures and one 50-minute section meeting per week.  This course satisfies the Second Writing Requirement, and 3 hours of it can be counted toward the English major under the "literature in translation" option. Also, under the ENGL 2010 rubric, this course can be used in lieu of an ENLT course as the pre-requisite for the English major.

CPLT 3590 Topics in Comparative Literature

1230-145 TR - CABELL 332
Instructor: Benjamin Bennett

CPLT 3710 Kafka and His Doubles

1100-1215 TR - CABELL 115
Instructor: Lorna Martens