1. University of Virginia
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Undergraduate Course Descriptions Fall 2015

English Surveys

ENGL 1500 Masterworks of Literature: Shakespeare and Milton

330-445 TR - GILMER 141
Instructor: Mark Edmundson

In this class we’ll study Shakespeare and Milton, almost certainly the two greatest writers in English.  We’ll explore Milton’s comprehensive and deeply religious vision as it emerges in Paradise Lost.  Then we’ll consider Shakespeare, the ultimate poet of worldliness. (He seems to have little time for faith.)  Possible plays: Henry IV, Part I, Othello, Antony and Cleopatra, As You Like It, Measure for Measure, Hamlet.  Shakespeare or Milton?  Who is the greater artist?  Who is the better guide to life?

ENGL 1500 Masterworks of Literature: The Literature of Fantasy: From Middle Earth to the Seven Kingdoms

200-315 MW - MINOR 125
Instructor: Bruce Holsinger

This lecture course explores the wondrous and magical world of modern fantasy literature, from JRR Tolkien's Middle Earth to the Hogwarts of Harry Potter, from the Arthurian realm of Marion Zimmer Bradley's "The Mists of Avalon" to George RR Martin's Seven Kingdoms in "Game of Thrones." The course will include a fair amount of background reading in the medieval works (epics, Arthurian romances, etc.) that inspire modern fantasy, as well as a careful look at fantasy's extra-literary afterlives in gaming (Dungeons & Dragons; World of Warcraft) and film adaptations. Requirements will include a midterm, a final, and several short writing assignments.

ENGL 2010 History of European Literature 1

LECTURE: 1230-145 TR - RUFFNER G004
Instructor: Paul Cantor
Cross-listed with CPLT 2020

This course surveys European literature from its origins in Ancient Greece through the Renaissance. As a course in literary history, it seeks to develop an understanding of period concepts, such as Medieval and Renaissance, as well as concepts of genre, such as epic, tragedy, and comedy.  Readings include (sometimes in the form of selections) the Iliad, the Odyssey, the Oresteia, Oedipus, Antigone, the Aeneid, the Inferno, Gargantua and Pantagruel, Hamlet, and Don Quixote. All foreign language works will be read in English translation.  Requirements: three papers and a final examination.  Two lectures and one section meeting per week.  This course satisfies the Second Writing Requirement and can be counted as a pre-requisite toward the English major in lieu of an ENLT course.

ENGL 3810 History of Literatures in English I, section 001

LECTURE: 1100-1150 MW - McLEOD 1020
Instructor: John Parker

We will start in the tenth century and end in the eighteenth, by which time you will have read some of the most powerful texts that Old, Middle and modern English have to offer: from anonymous poems in Anglo-Saxon to The Canterbury Tales of Geoffrey Chaucer; from the epic of John Milton to the mock-epic of Alexander Pope; drama from the medieval biblical cycles to Shakespeare and the Restoration; from the metaphysical conceits of John Donne to the scatalogical satire of Jonathan Swift.  The topics we'll cover are as diverse as the texts themselves, but certain questions loom large over the whole: should English literature take as its model the pagan classics or Christian scripture?  If it tries to take both, how are these at all compatible?  Economic and sexual concerns will be paramount.  Is money the root of all evil or is it God?  Is love love or is it war?  What about marriage?  We will repeatedly have to ask what it means to live with a consciousness not very happily related to its own embodiment.  What happens when we die?  Does literature offer a form of immortality and a forum for truth or is it a fraud?

Introductory Seminars in Literature

ENLT 2100 Introduction to Literary Studies

330-445 MW - CABELL 187
Instructor: Stephen Arata

The broad purposes of this course are to introduce you to ways of understanding texts within the discipline of literary studies and to improve your skills in critical thinking and writing. We will devote an equal amount of time (more or less) to reading lyric poetry, drama, and narrative fiction. The poems will be drawn from the last four centuries of Anglophone verse, from Shakespeare to Okot p’Bitek (and much in between). Our plays will be Wole Soyinka’s Death and the King’s Horseman and Tony Kushner’s Angels in America. For narrative fiction, we’ll spend some quality time with Emily Bronte’s Wuthering Heights and Jim Crace’s Being Dead. In addition to regular brief writing assignments, requirements will include three 5-6 page essays and a final exam.

ENLT 2100 Introduction to Literary Studies

200-315 MW - CABELL 027
Instructor: Christopher Krentz

Designed for prospective English majors and other interested students, this seminar will explore a wide sampling of significant poetry, fiction, and drama in English.  The syllabus is still under construction, but our readings will probably include a play by Shakespeare, poetry by Emily Dickinson, and novels by Ken Kesey and Edwidge Danticat (precise syllabus will be up on Collab by June).  Through class discussions and papers, students will develop skills in critical thinking and analytical writing that will serve them well in upper-level English courses and beyond.  Expect a decent but not overwhelming amount of reading and writing.  Requirements include thoughtful preparation and participation, three 5-6 page papers, and a final exam.

ENLT 2100 Introduction to Literary Studies

200-315 TR - CABELL 364
Instructor: Victor Luftig

We will read poems, plays, fiction, and essays in ways meant to introduce the study of literature at the college level: we’ll focus on how these types of writing work, on what we get from reading them carefully, and on what good and harm they may do in the world.  The texts will come from authors in Bacon and Shakespeare’s time to the present day, including Daniel DeFoe, Jonathan Swift, Emily Dickinson, Oscar Wilde, Virginia Woolf, Claude McKay, Langston Hughes, Chinua Achebe, Ntozake Shange, Alberto Rios, Marilyn Chin, Li-Young Lee, Sherman Alexie, and Chimamanda Adichie.  The course is meant to serve those who are interested in improving their reading and writing, for whatever reason;  those who seek an introductory humanities course; and thus who may wish subsequently to major in English.  We’ll discuss the works in class and online, and there will be three 5-6 page papers and a final exam.

ENLT 2513 Major Authors of American Literature

1200-1250 MWF - GIBSON 241
Instructor: Katelyn Durkin

ENLT 2523 Studies in Poetry

1230-145 TR - BRYAN 330
Instructor: Jessica Feldman

This course will introduce you to the aims, knowledge and skills involved in reading poetry and writing about it. . Think of this course as a “poetry immersion laboratory” where we will do things with poems such as reading them with enlightened curiosity; responding to them critically and creatively; translating them into other forms; performing them, and considering their existence as physical texts. Poetry-phobes,  poets, and those in-between equally welcome. Come learn to enjoy poetry!

ENLT 2523 Studies in Poetry

330-445 TR - MONROE 114
Instructor: Thomas Berenato

ENLT 2526 Studies in Fiction

1000-1050 MWF - NAU 241
Instructor: Anne Llewellyn

ENLT 2547 Black Writers in America: Black Women Writers

800-915 TR - NAU 142
Instructor: Lisa Woolfork

This seminar uses Black women’s writings from mid-century to the present to introduce new English majors to important concepts in literary analysis. To better understand genre, themes, and assorted literary conventions, we will focus closely on a range of literary styles.  We will also consider patterns of representation established in the 1950s and watch how they develop, disintegrate, or evolve into the present day.  Do certain issues or themes remain important in Black women’s writing of the last fifty years?  How has the literature adapted in response to specific cultural or historical moments?

ENLT 2548 Contemporary Literature

1100-1150 MWF - DELL 1 104
Instructor: Aaron Colton

ENLT 2550 Shakespeare

330-445 MW - CABELL 415
Instructor: Katharine Maus

ENLT 2552 Women in Literature: Austen & Her Contemporaries

330-445 MW - PAVILION VIII 108
Instructor: Kelly Fleming

Before Jane Austen’s place in the literary canon was a truth universally acknowledged, she was just another woman novelist writing at the end of the eighteenth century. This course will re-position Jane Austen’s novels within the context of the eighteenth-century novel and the writing of her contemporaries Frances Burney, Elizabeth Inchbald, and Maria Edgeworth. Just before the appearance of Austen’s quaint assemblies and country houses, Burney, Inchbald, and Edgeworth were writing about wild masquerades, the pleasures of shopping, and the surprises of London life. However, they also described “female difficulties” in detail: the sexual harassment women experienced in public spaces, the restraints placed upon them by propriety, and the state of dependence in which they lived.

Placed in the context of the eighteenth century, Austen’s novels stand out, provoking new and exciting questions about both Austen and her contemporaries. Why do Austen’s contemporaries refuse to call their works “novels”? Why does the epistolary novel fall out of fashion? What is the significance of Austen setting all of her novels in the country?  Why doesn’t Austen describe women dueling in breeches, the seduction of Catholic priests, or monkey attacks?  Other topics we will consider are: the history of a young lady novel, the anxieties of female authorship, the gothic, the dos and don’ts of female conduct, the rules of eighteenth-century fashion, and the impact of British imperialism on the novel.

ENLT 2555 Special Topics: Medicine and Culture

1100-1215 TR - LOCATION TBA
Instructor: Karen Chase

This is a course for students in the sciences who care about the forms of medical discourse that exist beyond the reach of professional journals, conferences, labs, or academic settings. It is also a course for those in the humanities who believe that health and disease are as much matters of literary concern, as they are fields of study or practice for those in the sciences. We meet – arts and sciences – in a common endeavor to examine the style, function, purpose and meaning of popular medical literature as it is published in fiction and non-fiction, produced in film, and as it is written by journalists, practitioners, researchers, patients, or others patient carers. Requirements include very active participation, report, one short essay which you will have a chance to revise, and one longer essay, final exam.

ENLT 2555 Special Topics: Becoming Your True Self

330-445 MW - CABELL 287
Instructor: Jon D'Errico

ENLT 2555 Special Topics: Landscapes of Black Education

500-615 TR - BRYAN 334
Instructor: Ian Grandison

This course examines how seemingly ordinary spaces and places around us, “landscapes,” are involved in the struggle to democratize education in the United States.  It focuses on African American education.  We explore how landscape is implicated in the secret prehistory of Black education under enslavement; the promise of public education during Reconstruction; Booker T. Washington’s accommodation during early Jim Crow; black college campus rebellions of the 1920s; the impact of Brown v. Board of Education, the rise of black studies programs at majority campuses in the 1960s and ‘70s; and the persistence of separate and unequal education in our current moment. We also touch on the experience of other marginalized groups, especially Native Americans and women.  For example, women’s college campuses, such as those of Mount Holyoke and Smith College, were designed to discipline women to accept prescribed gender roles at the height of the women’s suffrage movement.  There is a mandatory field trip to Richmond, via which we’ll apply our classroom knowledge to interrogate the campuses of several educational institutions, including Carver Elementary School, Maggie Walker Governor’s School, and Virginia Union University in their setting of Jackson Ward, once celebrated as Virginia’s Harlem.  Some of the materials include excerpts from the following: Frederick Douglass’ 1845 Narrative, Thomas Jefferson’s Notes on the State of Virginia, Booker T. Washington’s Up from Slavery, W. E. B. Du Bois’s Black Reconstruction in America, Raymond Wolters’ The New Negro on Campus, James D. Anderson’s The Education of Blacks in the South, and Helen Lefkowitz’s Alma Mater: Design and Experience in the Women’s Colleges. Films include With All Deliberate Speed and Honey-Coated Arsenic.  We’ll learn to read and use historical and contemporary maps, plans, and other design-related materials.  Assignments include a midterm, team-led student discussions, a team research project, a critical field trip reflection paper and revision, and a final critical reflection on the team project.

ENLT 2555 Special Topics: Modern and Contemporary Environmental Literature: Oil, Soil, and H20

900-950 MWF - GIBSON 241
Instructor:  Austin Hetrick

California is short of water. Rainforests in Brazil and Costa Rica are exploited and exported. And fracking and deepwater drilling announce the "tough oil" future. Both an introduction to ecocriticism and an examination of the writing that surrounds three major resources, this ENLT challenges students to think through the relationship between literary studies, historicism, science, and activism. We take as central premise that literary and environmental studies have something to gain from one another: that green issues can benefit from exposure to the mode of reading and thinking with which we approach literature. The particular green issues of interest here are the building blocks of human society, resources which have come under increasing pressure in the 20th and 21st century.

The course begins with the development and endangerment of California's perpetually threatened water supply. John Muir's essays about the damming of Hetch Hetchy (1909-1913), Mary Austin's 1920 novel The Ford, and Roman Polanski's film, Chinatown (1974) will frame a discussion about environmental limits, development, and relinquishment. In exploring literatures of soil, we will look at one of the original themes in ecocriticism: theories and modes of place attachment. We'll read the South African novelist J.M. Coetzee's retelling of Robinson Crusoe in Life & Times of Michael K (1983), explore the uranium-laced American southwest in Leslie Marmon Silko's Ceremony (1977), and study aboriginal "bush poetry" from Australia.  In our final unit, taking up that most amorphous of substances - oil - we'll explore the relationship between Western-style conservation writing and what Ramachandra Guha calls the "environmentalism of the poor." Readings for this section will necessarily explore how race, gender, and class define our interactions with resources and resource limits: how cultural difference defines and challenges attempts to generate global environmental ethics. Upton Sinclair's Oil! (1927), Amitav Ghosh's essay on "petrofiction" (1992), and Karen Tei Yamashita's dystopian novel of resource extraction Through the Arc of the Rainforest (1990) make up our final set of readings.

ENLT 2555 Special Topics: Victorian Literature

330-445 MW - CABELL 411
Instructor: Ann Mazur

ENLT 2555 Special Topics: The Vicious Arts

1200-1250 MWF - RUFFNER 173
Instructor: Stephen Hequembourg

Great villains, as we all know, are the key to great stories, poems, and movies.  We are fascinated by literary accounts of evil, by tales of perfect crimes and perfect criminals.  In this course we will examine a particular kind of literary criminal—one who acts not for any recognizable motive (revenge, fear, jealousy, money, etc.) but simply for the sake of doing evil, creating mayhem, and manipulating others.  “Evil be thou my good,” Satan declares in Paradise Lost.  In the great literary figures of this course—Iago, Satan, Barabas the Jew and Aaron the Moor, the Marquise de Merteuil, Humbert Humbert and Judge Holden—we will see how the principle of evil, the desire for self-creation, and a certain artistic flair combine to create a species of terrifying but utterly seductive super-villain.  We will think, discuss, and write about not only about these artists of evil and their work, but also about ourselves as consumers of their work.  Why is it that what we find so shocking and repulsive in real life is so fascinating as art?

Academic and NewsWriting

ENWR 1505 Writing and Critical Inquiry: Stretch I

Section Locations Variable
Fall Semesters

The first half of the "stretch" (two-semester) option for meeting the First Writing Requirement—intended to be taken during the first semester of study—this course approaches writing as a way of generating, representing, and reflecting on critical inquiry. Graded A, B, C, or NC.  Students who take ENWR 1505 must subsequently take ENWR 1506 to complete the First Writing Requirement.

ENWR 1506 Writing and Critical Inquiry: Stretch II

The second half of the "stretch" (two-semester) option for meeting the First Writing Requirement—intended to be taken during the second semester of study—this course approaches writing as a way of generating, representing, and reflecting on critical inquiry. Graded A, B, C, or NC.  Students who take ENWR 1506 should have taken ENWR 1505 in the prior semester to complete the First Writing Requirement.

ENWR 1507 Writing and Critical Inquiry: Stretch I for Multilingual Writers

Section Locations Variable
Fall Semesters

The first half of the "stretch" (two-semester) option for students still developing competency at writing in English, this course approaches writing as a way of generating, representing, and reflecting on critical inquiry. Intended to be taken during the first semester of study; graded A, B, C, or NC.  Students who take ENWR 1507 must subsequently take ENWR 1508 to complete the First Writing Requirement.

ENWR 1508 Writing and Critical Inquiry: Stretch II for Multilingual Writers

The second half of the "stretch" (two-semester) option for students still developing competency at writing in English, this course approaches writing as a way of generating, representing, and reflecting on critical inquiry. Intended to be taken during the second semester of study; graded A, B, C, or NC.  Students who take ENWR 1508 should have taken ENWR 1507 in the prior semester to complete the First Writing Requirement.

ENWR 1510 Writing and Critical Inquiry

Section Locations Variable
Fall and Spring Semesters

The single-semester option for meeting the first writing requirement—intended to be taken during the first year of study—this course approaches writing as a way of generating, representing, and reflecting on critical inquiry. Graded A, B, C, or NC. Students whose last names end in A-K must take ENWR 1510 in the fall; those with last names ending in L-Z take it in the spring.

ENWR 2520 Special Topics in Writing: Writing Digital Stories and Web Essays

1230-1455 TR – Location TBA
Instructor: Patricia Sullivan

Course meets Second Writing Requirement

The focus of the course will be students’ writing projects. Students will produce both conventional print texts such as written narratives and personal essays, alongside more multimodal electronic texts, such as digital stories and academic web essays. Through a mix of theory, examples of digital stories and academic web texts and our own texts, we may explore questions such as: How have emerging technologies changed the genres and modes of writing in the academy? how has the concept of “voice” and “persona” in the personal essay been affected by the inclusion of images and audio in a digital story? What is the relationship between a story and a script? What does it mean to develop and pursue a research question in the age of the internet? How have hypertextual and multimodal writing options challenged the linear, logical and hierarchical structure of academic essays through the possibilities of hyperlinks and juxtaposition? In what ways are writers becoming more like designers, directors, and DJs?

ENWR 2520 Special Topics in Writing: Writing with Style

100-150 TRMWF – BRYAN 332
Instructor: Keith Driver

Develops an understanding of the wide range of possible stylisitic moves, their uses, and implications. We will build a rich vocabulary for describing stylistic decisions, imitate and analyze exemplary writing, and discuss each other’s writing in a workshop setting.

ENWR 2700 Newswriting, sections 001 and 002

930-145am TR and 800-915am TR - Bryan 203, both sections
Course Meets Second Writing Requirement
Both sections cross-listed with MDST 2700
Instructor: C. Brian Kelly

Development of basic writing skills, with craftsmanship the emphasis. Study, discussion and rewrite of old and new media stories. Workshop setting. Readings from texts and various other sources. Progress from short hard-news pieces through speech stories, legislative and political coverage, to use of narrative and on to features in general. Repeated writing drills. Essential to follow current events as well. Satisfies second writing requirement.

Creative Writing

ENCW 2300 Poetry Writing, section 001

630-745 MW -  BRYAN 312
Instructor: Caitlin Neely

An introductory course in poetry writing, with a primary focus on creating new poems in a workshop setting. Students will study basic poetic terms and techniques and revise and arrange a series of poems for a final portfolio. The course will also have extensive outside reading and non-creative writing requirements.  While first- and second-years are the primary audience for ENCW 2300, SIS maintains two seats for third- and fourth-year students.  For more details on undergraduate creative writing, including our enrollment policies, see this page.

ENCW 2300 Poetry Writing, section 002

930-1045 TR - BRYAN 330
Instructor: Veronica Kuhn

An introductory course in poetry writing, with a primary focus on creating new poems in a workshop setting. Students will study basic poetic terms and techniques and revise and arrange a series of poems for a final portfolio. The course will also have extensive outside reading and non-creative writing requirements.  While first- and second-years are the primary audience for ENCW 2300, SIS maintains two seats for third- and fourth-year students.  

For more details on undergraduate creative writing, including our enrollment policies, see this page.

ENCW 2300 Poetry Writing, section 003

1200-1250 MWF - BRYAN 330
Instructor: Annie Pittman

An introductory course in poetry writing, with a primary focus on creating new poems in a workshop setting. Students will study basic poetic terms and techniques and revise and arrange a series of poems for a final portfolio. The course will also have extensive outside reading and non-creative writing requirements.  While first- and second-years are the primary audience for ENCW 2300, SIS maintains two seats for third- and fourth-year students.  

For more details on undergraduate creative writing, including our enrollment policies, see this page.

ENCW 2300 Poetry Writing, section 004

500-615 MW - BRYAN 310
Instructor: Robert Shapiro

An introductory course in poetry writing, with a primary focus on creating new poems in a workshop setting. Students will study basic poetic terms and techniques and revise and arrange a series of poems for a final portfolio. The course will also have extensive outside reading and non-creative writing requirements.  While first- and second-years are the primary audience for ENCW 2300, SIS maintains two seats for third- and fourth-year students.  

For more details on undergraduate creative writing, including our enrollment policies, see this page.

ENCW 2300 Poetry Writing, section 005

1000-1050 MWF - BRYAN 312
Instructor: Courtney Flerlage

An introductory course in poetry writing, with a primary focus on creating new poems in a workshop setting. Students will study basic poetic terms and techniques and revise and arrange a series of poems for a final portfolio. The course will also have extensive outside reading and non-creative writing requirements.  While first- and second-years are the primary audience for ENCW 2300, SIS maintains two seats for third- and fourth-year students.  

For more details on undergraduate creative writing, including our enrollment policies, see this page.

ENCW 2600 Fiction Writing, section 001

1100-1215 TRF - BRYAN 330
Instructor:  Jeb Livingood

An introductory course in fiction writing, with a primary focus on creating short stories in a workshop setting. Students will study basic narrative terms and techniques and revise several short stories for a final portfolio. The course will also have extensive outside reading and non-creative writing requirements.  While first- and second-years are the primary audience for ENCW 2600, SIS maintains two seats for third- and fourth-year students.  

For more details on undergraduate creative writing, including our enrollment policies, see this page.

ENCW 2600 Fiction Writing, section 002

500-615 TR - BRYAN 312
Instructor:  Jeremy Townley

In this intensive introduction to fiction writing, we'll develop skills to create vivid, surprising, and truthful short fiction. We’ll read about and discuss the elements of narrative craft; study numerous short stories by masters of the form; and develop our short fiction through exercises, workshops, and one-on-one conferences.

For more details on undergraduate creative writing, including our enrollment policies, see this page.

ENCW 2600 Fiction Writing, section 003

1200-1250 MWF - BRYAN 312
Instructor:  Caitlin Fitzpatrick

An introductory course in fiction writing, with a primary focus on creating short stories in a workshop setting. Students will study basic narrative terms and techniques and revise several short stories for a final portfolio. The course will also have extensive outside reading and non-creative writing requirements.  While first- and second-years are the primary audience for ENCW 2600, SIS maintains two seats for third- and fourth-year students.  

For more details on undergraduate creative writing, including our enrollment policies, see this page.

ENCW 2600 Fiction Writing, section 004

930-1045 TR - BRYAN 332
Instructor:  Justine Pekalak

An introductory course in fiction writing, with a primary focus on creating short stories in a workshop setting. Students will study basic narrative terms and techniques and revise several short stories for a final portfolio. The course will also have extensive outside reading and non-creative writing requirements.  While first- and second-years are the primary audience for ENCW 2600, SIS maintains two seats for third- and fourth-year students.

For more details on undergraduate creative writing, including our enrollment policies, see this page.

ENCW 2600 Fiction Writing, section 005

630-745 MW - BRYAN 310
Instructor:  Jeffrey Horn

An introductory course in fiction writing, with a primary focus on creating short stories in a workshop setting. Students will study basic narrative terms and techniques and revise several short stories for a final portfolio. The course will also have extensive outside reading and non-creative writing requirements.  While first- and second-years are the primary audience for ENCW 2600, SIS maintains two seats for third- and fourth-year students.  

For more details on undergraduate creative writing, including our enrollment policies, see this page.

ENCW 2600 Fiction Writing, section 006

1100-1150 MW - BRYAN 310
Instructor:  Helen Chandler

An introductory course in fiction writing, with a primary focus on creating short stories in a workshop setting. Students will study basic narrative terms and techniques and revise several short stories for a final portfolio. The course will also have extensive outside reading and non-creative writing requirements.  While first- and second-years are the primary audience for ENCW 2600, SIS maintains two seats for third- and fourth-year students.  

For more details on undergraduate creative writing, including our enrollment policies, see this page.

ENCW 2600 Fiction Writing, section 007

900-950 MWF - BRYAN 310
Instructor: Jesus de la Torre

An introductory course in fiction writing, with a primary focus on creating short stories in a workshop setting. Students will study basic narrative terms and techniques and revise several short stories for a final portfolio. The course will also have extensive outside reading and non-creative writing requirements.  While first- and second-years are the primary audience for ENCW 2600, SIS maintains two seats for third- and fourth-year students.  For more details on undergraduate creative writing, including our enrollment policies, see this page.

ENCW 3310 Intermediate Poetry Writing

200-430 W - CABELL 364
Restricted to Instructor Permission
Instructor: Debra Nystrom

A weekly 2.5-hour class for students advanced beyond the level of ENCW 2300. Emphasis is on workshop of students' own poems, with focused writing exercises and written responses to relevant outside reading, as well as class discussions on issues of contemporary poetry. Final poetry portfolio required. ADMISSION BY PERMISSION OF INSTRUCTOR ONLY.

APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS:  Sample of student work (4-5 poems) to be submitted IN A SINGLE DOCUMENT (either electronically in MS Word, or a hard paper copy) by 12:00 PM Noon on August 15, 2014, to Professor Nystrom’s email address at dln8u@virginia.edu or to her English Dept faculty mailbox in 229 Bryan Hall; submissions should include a cover sheet with name, year, email address, telephone number, major, prior workshop experience, and other workshops to which you are submitting.   Every effort will be made to notify students of acceptance during the week prior to the beginning of classes, so students may finalize their schedules in SIS.

ENCW 3310 Intermediate Poetry Writing

100-330 W - DAWSON'S ROW 1
Restricted to Instructor Permission
Instructor: Lisa Russ Spaar

This is a workshop for serious makers of poems with poetry writing experience.  Admission is by instructor permission only.  Students interested in the course must submit 5 or so poems to the professor by hard copy or e-mail as soon as possible.

STUDENTS SHOULD ALSO REQUEST PERMISSION TO ENROLL THROUGH SIS.

We live in an age of easy and ubiquitous self-portrayal.  Instagram, Snapchat, Facebook, Skype, YouTube, and other digital and cellular “galleries” (whose technologies are developing so rapidly that by the time this entry appears in print some may already be obsolete) allow individuals a protean array of venues in which to post, curate, manipulate, and remove visual images and verbal profiles of themselves with what seems like a faster than real-time alacrity.  This proliferation of self-portraiture is so rampant that it’s possible for viewers and readers to become inured to its magic, craft, and power.

In this course we will explore poetic self-portraiture through a series of exercises and open challenges that invite the practicing poet to investigate and portray the self through manifold lenses, indirection, and what Anne Carson would call poetic “ruses."  The poems produced in this workshop will take as their ostensible subject the poet him or herself, but of course will allow each poet to explore his/her flood subjects, with the intention, too, of foregrounding the processes by and reasons why we make poems.

ENCW 3350 Intermediate Non-Fiction Writing

1100-130 W - TBA
Instructor: Sydney Blair

We will read examples of literary nonfiction by such writers as Tom Wolfe, Virginia Woolf, Henry Allen, Jamaica Kincaid, F. Scott Fitzgerald, David Foster Wallace and Joan Didion, to name a few, as a way of discovering and defining just what “literary nonfiction” is.  Students will write short nonfiction pieces throughout the semester, as well as two longer, polished, well-crafted essays.  Topics might include the personal essay, memoir, profile piece, travel or food writing, arts writing, for example. This class will be structured along the lines of a creative writing workshop so that prior experience in such classes is useful, but not necessary.  A love of reading and writing is essential.

Anyone interested in taking this course should submit an essay/nonfiction piece, or a short story (12 pages max, hard copy preferable but email OK), at least 10 days before classes begin in August.  Please attach a note telling me who and what year you are, your e-mail address, what workshops or related classes you’ve taken and with whom, and any other relevant information. I will do my best to maneuver my way around the SIS Permissions Section to let you know of your status a week before our first class.  INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION.

ENCW 3610 Intermediate Fiction Writing, section 001

500-730 W - DAWSON'S ROW 1
Restricted to Instructor Permission
Instructor: Elizabeth Denton

Read short fiction.  Write your own.  Students will write two stories and revise one. Creative responses to weekly reading assignments encourage students to focus on the most fundamental aspect of the short story:  scene making.   Active classroom participation and love of reading and writing are essential.

To be considered for this class, please send a short story (up to 15 pages), no later than one week before classes begin, to me at ed3m@virginia.edu.  Attach a note telling me who and what year you are, your email address, what workshops you’ve taken and with whom, and whether you’re applying to other workshops. I will alert you through SIS a week or so before classes begin.  INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION (which means you must submit work to be considered—see above).

ENCW 3610 Intermediate Fiction Writing, section 002

330-600 T - DAWSON'S ROW 1
Restricted to Instructor Permission

Instuctor: Staff

A workshop-based writing course in fiction. Students should ideally have taken ENCW 2600 (formerly ENWR 2600) at UVA, or have some prior fiction-writing experience.

This class will be taught by a new English faculty member. To be considered for this class, please log into SIS and request permission to take the course. Then please send a short story (up to 15 pages), no later than one week before classes begin, to Jeb Livingood at jsl9z@virginia.edu.  Attach a note telling him who and what year you are, your email address, what workshops you’ve taken and with whom, and whether you’re applying to other workshops. The new instructor will alert you through SIS a week or so before classes begin.  INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION (which means you must submit work to be considered—see above).

ENCW 4810 Advanced Fiction Writing

1100-130 T - TBA
Restricted to Instructor Permission
Instructor: Sydney Blair

This workshop is designed for students who have had some previous experience in -- and who feel passionate about -- the reading and writing of short fiction. We will read stories by published writers to learn how and why they make the choices they do when it comes to point of view, character development, plot considerations, pacing, to name a few, and students will write two stories by the end of the semester, revising one. There will be some short writing exercises at the start of the semester, and attendance at one or two local readings is required. Classroom participation is a must.

To be considered for this class, you should submit a short story no later than one week before classes begin in August. The story should be no longer than 15 pages (fewer pages is fine; a hard copy preferable, but e-mail is OK) and you should attach a note telling me who and what year you are, your e-mail address, what workshops you’ve taken and with whom, whether you’re applying to any other workshops, and any other relevant information. I will post a list a day or two before our first class, and will make every attempt to negotiate SIS’s Permissions system to alert you that way, too. As there is invariably more interest in these workshops than there is space, you should be sure to have an alternate registration plan.  INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION.

ENCW 4830 Advanced Poetry Writing 

200-430 W - MINOR 130
Instructor: Gregory Orr

ENCW 5310 Advanced Poetry Writing

100-330 T - BRYAN 312
Instructor: Lisa Russ Spaar

This course for advanced writers will be generative, encouraging its participants to explore and deepen into their obsessions (what Emily Dickinson would call their “Flood subjects”) even as they experiment beyond modes, habits, and stylistic gestures that may have become knee-jerk or comfortable.   In addition to producing “stand-alone” poems, each member of the workshop will produce at least one short series or curation of related poems before the semester’s close.  This is a workshop for serious makers of poems with prior poetry and/or fiction writing experience, and is open to advanced undergraduates and graduate students.  Admission is by instructor permission only.  Students interested in the course must submit 5 or so poems to the professor by hard copy or e-mail as soon as possible.  Please accompany the poetry sample with a brief cover letter, detailing prior writing experience/coursework/instructors, and giving a good working e-mail address as well.  Students must also request permission to enroll through SIS.

ENCW 5610 Advanced Fiction Writing

Times/Days/Location - TBA
Instructor: TBA

Poetry Writing Program

ENPW 4820 Poetry Program Poetics

500-730 M - CABELL 415
Restricted to Instructor Permission
Instructor: Gregory Orr
 

ENPW 4920 Poetry Capstone

330-600 R - BRYAN 233
Restricted to Instructor Permission
Instructor: Paul Guest

This is the second part of a two-semester project [The Capstone Course (ENPW 4910/4920)] designed for fourth-year students in the Department’s Area Program in Poetry Writing.  The Capstone project is a year-long investigation of faculty and student-directed, shared texts that allows advanced poetry writing students to read widely and across disciplines in areas of individual aesthetic interest, to begin to think beyond the single poem and into ways poetry manuscripts can be organized, to become more deeply aware of their own patterns and evolving aesthetic, and to create new work.  The spring semester involves a combination of weekly discussion of individual student manuscripts and one-on-one conferring with the instructor.  After mid-term, students are assigned a graduate student mentor, who also offers the poetry manuscript a close reading.  The course culminates in the production by each student of a manuscript of original poetry.

Literary Prose

ENLP 4550 Topics in Literary Prose: Flash Fiction

500-730 R - DAWSON'S ROW 1
Instructor: Elizabeth Denton

Flash fiction is an increasingly visible genre—as distinct from the short story as the short story is from the novel.  We will study many types of flash fiction (conceptual, pictorial, allegorical, surreal, and scene-based to name a few) paying close attention to the different configurations of narrative scaffolding and of course to the language on which such very short pieces entirely depend.  We will read short pieces by Lydia Davis, John Cheever, Robert Coover, George Saunders, Italo Calvino, Franz Kafka, Dino Buzzati, Grace Paley, Cynthia Ozick, Marilyn Robison, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Junot Diaz, Amy Hempel, Tobias Wolf, Ernest Hemmingway and many, many others.   Our exploration of the genre will likely include Aesop’s fables, a novel (Mrs. Bridge by Evan S. Connell) that uses a linear sequence of stand-alone scenes to tell a story, a full-length short story (Paul Theroux’s Voices of Love) which juxtaposes distinct flash-like pieces, graphic fiction, and very short narrative films.  Students will be expected to write a flash story of their own every week and although we will not officially critique the student stories, there will be many opportunities to distribute them and to discuss them, both in class and in conference.

Medieval Literature

ENMD 3130 Old Icelandic Literature in Translation

200-315 TR - BRYAN 235
Instructor: John Casteen

A survey of major works written in Iceland from around 1100 to the end of the Middle Ages. The texts include several family and regional sagas, short narratives related to certain of these, to historiography of the settlement period, and to Iceland's conversion to Christianity, and a few selections from the Poetic Edda and the Edda of Snorri Sturluson.  All readings are in translation.

ENMD 3559 Thomas Malory's King Arthur

930-1045 TR - CABELL 332
Instructor: Elizabeth Fowler

We explore Le Morte Darthur, the famous compendium of stories about King Arthur's life; it's the most influential early prose fiction in English, still producing imitations, sequels, and prequels in every medium known to art. Writing a century after Chaucer and a century before Shakespeare, Malory is spell-binding and curiously dry, full of terse, flat statements of shocking, magical, moving acts. We'll puzzle over what makes it tick. Probably two short papers and a couple of short exams, with a few creative alternatives (writers, artists, and game developers welcome).

ENMD 5010 Old English1000-1050 MWF - BRYAN 235
Instructor: Peter Baker

In this course, open to both undergraduates and graduates, you will learn to read the language of Beowulf—that is, the English language as preserved in sources from around 700 to 1100. After a brief introduction to the language (which is alarming at first glance but much easier to learn than any foreign language), readings will include prose excerpts from historical and religious sources and several verse classics, including The Battle of Maldon, The Wanderer, The Dream of the Rood, and The Wife’s Lament. Work for the course includes bi-weekly quizzes, a brief final exam, and a short paper. This course is a prerequisite for Beowulf, offered in the spring term.

ENMD 5559 Prayer

1230-145 TR - BRYAN 332
Instructor: Elizabeth Fowler
Cross-listed with ENRN 5559

An investigation of the range and beauty of English prayer together with its furniture, clothing, jewelry, postures, rituals, and architecture during a tumultuous time when these were life or death matters -- from medieval England and its proliferating manuscript Books of Hours through Reformation Britain and its mutilated and repurposed statues, buildings, and printed prayer books.  Our reading will include anonymous authors as well as famous writers and translators such as Geoffrey Chaucer, John Lydgate, Thomas Wyatt, Philip and Mary Sidney, Thomas Smith, Edmund Spenser, John Donne, George Herbert, and Henry Vaughan.  We'll consider poetry's involvement in birth, coming of age, marriage, death, memory, habit, devotion, and violence.  A series of research and writing assignments will allow you to choose your area of work and build towards a seminar paper, where the goal will be to invent ways to understand literary language as it participates in larger networks of social practice and the history of the built environment.  The seminar welcomes both undergraduate and graduate students interested in lyric poetry, architecture and horticultural design, theology, contemplative practices, music, the psalms and the Song of Songs, or the anthropology of ritual.  But there's no previous knowledge required. Contact the instructor, Prof Elizabeth Fowler, at fowler@virginia.edu, with any questions.

Renaissance Literature

ENRN 3130 The Seventeenth Century

930-1045 TR - CABELL 485
Instructor: Daniel Kinney

We will survey the various and curious perspectives of seventeenth-century English lyric and how it can distill, crystalize, and refract the mixed matter of everyday life in an era of pronounced cultural crisis. We will also discuss the mixed fortunes of seventeenth-century poetic styles, from contempt and neglect in the following century to a startling and long-lasting 20th-century vogue thanks to Eliot and the so-called New Critics. Class requirements: regular participation including brief email responses, one short and one longer paper, and a final exam.

ENRN 3210 Shakespeare, section 001

LECTURE: 1200-1250 MW - RUFFNER G008
Instructor: Katharine Maus

ENRN 4410 Shakespeare

330-445 MW - CABELL 411
Instructor: Katharine Maus

ENRN 4500 Prayer

1230-145 TR - BRYAN 332
Instructor: Elizabeth Fowler

cross-listed with ENMD 4500

An investigation of English prayer texts together with furniture, clothing, jewelry, postures, rituals, and architectural settings during a tumultuous time when these were life or death matters -- from medieval England and its proliferating Books of Hours through Reformation Britain and its mutilated statues, buildings, and books.  Our reading will include lots of anonymous authors as well as Geoffrey Chaucer, John Lydgate, Philip and Mary Sidney, John Donne, George Herbert, and Henry Vaughan.  A series of research and writing assignments will culminate in a seminar paper, in which the goal will be to invent ways to understand language as it participates in social practices and the history of the built environment.

ENRN 4500 Advanced Studies in Renaissance Literature: Renaissance Drama

330-445 MW - BRYAN 312
Instructor: John Parker

To examine some of Shakespeare's greatest contemporaries and rivals, in particular Christopher Marlowe and Ben Jonson, with special attention to the London theater's sub-genres: revenge tragedy, city comedy and tragi-comedy.  Other authors may include Thomas Kyd, Francis Beaumont, John Fletcher, George Chapman, Thomas Middleton, John Webster, John Ford and Philip Massinger.  We will try to get a sense of what it means to speak of a "Renaissance" at this moment in English history; how the playtexts were printed and subsequently edited; and how the documents we read relate to stage productions we can only reimagine on this textual basis.

ENRN 5559 Prayer

1230-145 TR - BRYAN 332
Instructor: Elizabeth Fowler
Cross-listed with ENMD 5559

An investigation of the range and beauty of English prayer together with its furniture, clothing, jewelry, postures, rituals, and architecture during a tumultuous time when these were life or death matters -- from medieval England and its proliferating manuscript Books of Hours through Reformation Britain and its mutilated and repurposed statues, buildings, and printed prayer books.  Our reading will include anonymous authors as well as famous writers and translators such as Geoffrey Chaucer, John Lydgate, Thomas Wyatt, Philip and Mary Sidney, Thomas Smith, Edmund Spenser, John Donne, George Herbert, and Henry Vaughan.  We'll consider poetry's involvement in birth, coming of age, marriage, death, memory, habit, devotion, and violence.  A series of research and writing assignments will allow you to choose your area of work and build towards a seminar paper, where the goal will be to invent ways to understand literary language as it participates in larger networks of social practice and the history of the built environment.  The seminar welcomes both undergraduate and graduate students interested in lyric poetry, architecture and horticultural design, theology, contemplative practices, music, the psalms and the Song of Songs, or the anthropology of ritual.  But there's no previous knowledge required. Contact the instructor, Prof Elizabeth Fowler, at fowler@virginia.edu, with any questions.

Restoration and Eighteenth Century Literature

ENEC 3110 Grub Street: High Culture, Low Culture, and Media Revolution of the Eighteenth Century

200-315 TR - DELL 2 100
Instructor: John O'Brien

The late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries were when a lot of things that students of literature now take for granted first came into being: the English novel, the concept of the author as owner of his or her own works, and indeed, the concept of literature itself as a distinct entity, an area of culture that can be assessed, evaluated, and studied. This course will survey writing of this period with special attention to how these things happened. In particular, we will focus on the conflict that emerged between high and low cultures, between the “literary,” those works considered to have permanent artistic merit, and the “literatory,” the factory-like site where the ephemeral works of popular culture—summed up by the term “Grub Street”-- were produced. Among the topics that we will take up will be coterie writing, copyright law, the dispute between the ancients and the moderns, the increasing importance of originality and the peculiar nature of literary property. Some of the authors that we will be reading are probably familiar, at least by name: Aphra Behn, Daniel Defoe, Susanna Centlivre, Alexander Pope, Eliza Haywood, Samuel Richardson, Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, Henry Fielding, and Joseph Addison, among others. But we will also be reading “popular” works—pamphlets, chapbooks, and broadsides—to give a sense of the full range of reading matter, literary and Grubean, available to readers of English in this period. Members of this class will also participate in a digital project, editing primary texts of this period to go into a web-based repository for our use, and the use of other students.

ENEC 4500 Advanced Studies in Eighteenth Century Literature: Living with Strangers: The Urban Eighteenth Century

1230-145 TR - BRYAN 310
Instructor: Alison Hurley

London was big.  By 1720 it claimed half a million inhabitants and was the largest city in Europe.  Yet if London was physically vast, its cultural importance was even more expansive.  As the financial, political, commercial, social, and literary hub of eighteenth-century Britain, London overwhelmed visitors with the intensity and disparity of urban life.  Filthy and fashionable, criminal and cultivated, it was a sink of contagion and a stage for display.  A city of anonymous strangers, London bred imposture and alienation.  It also created opportunities for personal reinvention–for making oneself anew.  No wonder the city captured the imagination of the nation.  In this class we will explore the impact of the urban experience on the thought and writings of men and women living in London during the 1700s.  We will consider how different kinds of texts transformed the seemingly incomprehensible experience of London into something legible and contained.  Additionally, we will consider how the city, in turn, shaped texts according to its own rhythms, structures, and spaces.  Our research interests will focus on the ways in which conventional literary genres (e.g. plays, poems, novels) remain in dialog with contemporaneous “non-literary” texts (e.g. maps, medical treatises, newspapers).

Requirements include pop quizzes, brief reading responses, and a series of research-oriented assignments culminating in a 15-page paper.

Nineteenth Century British Literature

ENNC 3120 English Poetry and Prose of the Nineteenth Century: Victorian Poetry and Prose

1230-145 TR - CABELL 332
Instructor: Herbert Tucker

Because they were the first people in history to face in full the alienating effects of industrial capitalism on human relations, the Victorians sorely needed to belong.  Our syllabus will survey the many categories that Victorians invented to live in: nation, class, and church; gender, family, and race.  Such categories were not naturally given but had to be perennially recreated; and keeping up one’s membership exacted steep dues.  These were paid in many currencies (creeds, appetites, fashions), most extravagantly that of the literary imagination, performing non-stop within the greatest print culture on earth.  We’ll study the extraordinary variety of Victorian verse and prose – the latter largely in nonfiction genres (essay, memoir, science, ethnography, art appreciation), though we may treat ourselves to a framing novella or two.  Guided discussion, often prompted  by brief informal lecture, will will emerge from a format of informal lecture.  Several papers and an exam.

ENNC 3500 Nineteenth Century Topics: World Gothic

930-1045 TR - CABELL 338
Instructor: Alison Booth

How does a genre like Gothic “travel”?  What are some of the spaces and social themes of Gothic since the eighteenth century, from novels to film?  Tensions over authority and nationhood, class and gender, and both the confinement of space and its invasion or disintegration play out in the various works we study. A wilderness, a mountaintop or “sea of ice,” a haunted house or ruined abbey, an ancestral secret, an escape, a hunt, a pilgrimage—all forms of spatial orientation for narrative—have taken different forms in literature in different times and countries.  Although centered in nineteenth-century British and American literature, the course includes a range of fiction, travel narrative, poetry, and visual forms; readings selected from Walpole, Austen, Mary Shelley, Irving, Bronte, Poe, Hawthorne, Stoker, James, and others.  Presentations, two essays, a research project, tests and a final.

ENNC 3500 Nineteenth Century Topics: From Romanticism to Modernism

1100-1215 TR - CABELL 315
Instructor: Jerome McGann

cross-listed with ENMC 3500

The course will study closely a series of pivotal works that shaped the cultural reception of poetry from the Romantic to the Modern periods. Included here will be Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron,
Tennyson, Swinburne, Poe, Whitman, and Dickinson.

ENNC 3850 Nineteenth Century Literature: The Fiction of Empire

330-445 MW - DELL 2 100
Instructor: Paul Cantor

This course deals with the interplay of literature and British imperialism in the late nineteenth century. Topics include: orientalism and the representation of the foreign, the ideology of imperialism, critiques of imperialism, the impact of imperialism on domestic life in Victorian Britain, the problem of heroism on the imperial frontier, and the intersection between fiction of empire and other genres, such as science fiction, the mystery story, and the Gothic novel. Authors studied include Rider Haggard, Rudyard Kipling, Robert Louis Stevenson, Mark Twain, H. G.

Wells, Arthur Conan Doyle, and Joseph Conrad. Course requirements include two papers and a final examination.

ENNC 4500 Advanced Studies in Nineteenth Century Literature: The Greater Lyric

330-445 TR - BRYAN 312
Instructor: Herbert Tucker

A course for fledged English majors ready to spread their wings.  We’ll soar over terrain generally familiar to you from previous survey work, and we’ll know it anew by swooping to particular instances of a strikingly ambitious kind of text, one where creative impediment enables poetic breakthrough.  The “greater lyric” is an extended genre of exploratory verse meditation chiefly associated with the Romantic period.  But, on a longer view, it has been around in English for half a millennium.  Its roots clutch at antique forms of ode, psalm, elegy, and epistle; its offshoots burgeon still in poetry by our contemporaries.  An August week or two on generic heralds from Tudor days across the 18th century, and a December coda on 20th-century pursuivants, will frame our central inquiry into the fortunes of the greater lyric from the 1790s to the 1890s.  Major poets will include Spenser, Milton, Coleridge, Wordsworth, Shelley, Keats, Tennyson, Whitman, Yeats, Stevens; we’ll go canyoning too with the likes of Jonson, Finch, Gray, Coleridge, the Brownings, Dickinson, Bishop.  Along the way we’ll practice the close-reading arts of figural and metrical analysis, grasping how the the forward momentum of career-defining poems has, under increasingly secular imaginative constraint, articulated durable grounds for consolation – and has jumped, at times, for joy.  A set of essays and in-class presentations will lead each student to a substantial final paper.

ENNC 4500 Advanced Studies in Nineteenth Century Literature: Houses, Countries, and Nineteenth Century Literature

1230-145 TR - TBA
Instructor: Alison Booth

At different periods, a house, like race, can mean family, which in turn can include all those who live in association, including slaves or servants. A country can mean vicinity, landscape/not-city, or nation, as well as all the places associated with an idea or person.  We will study literature and culture associated with meanings of houses and countries, both American and British, especially 1840-1940. The course will offer some secondary readings on the meaning of domestic space and its actual designs (as in the styles of middle-class houses by the nineteenth century) as well as essays about literary pilgrimage to visit writers’ houses.  We will interpret the role of houses and countries or other spaces, as in great estates, homes of writers, regions, or fictional settings.  Readings may include a few poems, novels by Austen, the Brontës, Trollope, Hawthorne, Dickens, James, and short pieces by Poe and Irving. The course will include a selection of films.  Students will undertake a short digital research project such as a map or other visualization or a textual edition.  In addition to this project, occasional quizzes, a 2-3-pp. essay, a presentation, and 8-10-pp. essay are required.

ENNC 4500 Advanced Studies in Nineteenth Century Literature: Childhood

1100-1215 TR - NAU 241
Instructor: Mark Edmundson

We’ll explore conceptions of childhood in this course. We’ll ponder Aries and Van den Berg on “the invention of childhood.”  We’ll read Wordsworth and Rousseau, creators (or maybe discoverers) of the Romantic child; and we’ll read Freud who does all he can to debunk the Romantic ideal.  We’ll consider Mark Twain, who in Huck gives us a remarkable literary rendition of “the kid.”  We’ll visit Malcolm X and Simone de Beauvoir, for their versions of childhood.  And we’ll talk about what may be the currently emerging version of young life: the achiever.   Quizzes and short essays: in the end an analytical piece / memoir about childhood.

ENNC 4500 Advanced Studies in Nineteenth Century Literature: Poetry in the Age of Industrial Printing

500-615 MW - CABELL 045
Instructor: Andrew Stauffer

How did the great media changes brought about by modern print technologies shape nineteenth-century poetry in Britain and America? In this class, we will be investigating how book history affected literary history from 1830-1900, looking at bibliographic details in relationship to poetic form and content, considering topics such as the periodical press, illustration and decoration, paper and bindings, the morphology of the book, and the history of the book trade. We will also think about the implications of digital technology for our present-day encounters with this material from the past. Requirements: two bibliographical studies, a long essay with a substantial book-historical research component, and a final exam.

Modern and Contemporary Literature

ENMC 3120 Modern and Contemporary Literature: 20th Century American Literature

LECTURE: 1000-1050 MW - CABELL 032
Instructor: Stephen Railton

DISCUSSIONS:
R 330-420 - MAURY 113
R 430-520 - MAURY 113

Cross-listed with ENAM 3120

We'll look closely at selected works from two decades: the 1920s (the Jazz Age, if you like Fitzgerald; the Lost Generation, if you prefer Hemingway) and the 1930s (the Great Depression to just about everyone, though you may wonder about that use of the word "great").  We'll read poetry by Eliot, Stevens, Williams and Hughes and fiction by Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner, West, Steinbeck, Hurston and Wright.  We'll read each text on both its own terms and in terms of a larger conversation about these two decades and how they define the project of American literature.

ENMC 3500 Studies in Modern and Contemporary Literature: Musical Fictions

200-430 R - CLARK 101
Instructor: Njelle Hamilton

In this interdisciplinary course we will explore the genre of the contemporary musical novel as we read seminal blues, jazz, reggae, mambo, calypso and rock novels from writers such as James Baldwin, Ishmael Reed, Michael Thelwell, Oscar Hijuelos, Esi Edugyan, and Nick Hornby.  We will explore issues such as: How and why do contemporary writers record the sounds (instruments, rhythm, melody, tone), lyrics, structure, and personal and cultural valences of music, not on wax, but in novelistic prose, and what does it mean to simultaneously read and ‘listen to’ such novels? What kinds of cultural baggage and aesthetic conventions do particular music forms bring to the novel form? Why are writers and readers both so intrigued by the figure of the musician as a literary trope? Assignments include: listening and reading journals, oral presentations,  musical and literary reviews, and a final paper.

ENMC 3500 Studies in Modern and Contemporary Literature: From Romanticism to Modernism

1100-1215 TR - CABELL 315
Instructor: Jerome McGann
cross-listed with ENNC 3500

The course will study closely a series of pivotal works that shaped the cultural reception of poetry from the Romantic to the Modern periods. Included here will be Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron,
Tennyson, Swinburne, Poe, Whitman, and Dickinson.

ENMC 3559 New Course in Modern Literature: The Vietnam War in Literature and Film

200-315 MW - CABELL 168
Instructor: Sylvia Chong

The Vietnam War (1964-1975) not only claimed over 58,000 American and 1.1 million Vietnamese lives, but also spilled over into wars in Laos and Cambodia (with another 3 million dead) and created a global mass migration of Southeast Asian refugees. This course traces the literature and films produced from that conflict, including writings from the Southeast Asian diaspora. Films may  include The Deer Hunter, From Hollywood to Hanoi, Gran Torino, and New Years Baby, and texts may include Tim O’Brien’s The Things They Carried, Bobbie Ann Mason’s In Country, Monique Truong’s The Book of Salt, G.B. Tran’s Vietnamerica, and Duong Thu Huong’s Novel without a Name, and non-fiction selections from Michael Herr, Susan Sontag, John Kerry, Andrew Pham, Andrew Lam, and Trinh T. Minh-ha, and poetry by Yusek Komunyakaa, John Balaban, Bao Phi, Kosal Khiev, and Ocean Vuong.

ENMC 4500 Advanced Studies in Modern and Contemporary Literature: The Contemporary Anglophone Novel

330-445 MW - BRYAN 330
Instructor: Stephen Arata

The themes of this course are migration, exile, displacement, and (sometimes) return. Our primary readings will consist of 21st century anglophone fiction drawn from around the globe. Likely candidates include Helen Oyiyemi, Chimamanda Ngozi Adiche, Teju Cole, Michael Ondaatje, NoViolet Bulawayo, Monica Ali, Geoff Dyer, Aleksandar Hemon, and Dinaw Mengestu. We will also engage with the lively current debate on the status of world literature as a field of study by way of selected critical pieces by writers such as Amit Chaudhuri, David Damrosch, Emily Apter, and Simon Gikandi. Requirements will include two essays and a handful of shorter writing assignments.

ENMC 4500 Advanced Studies in Modern and Contemporary Literature: Ulysses and Infinite Jest

330-445 TR - BRYAN 330
Instructor: Michael Levenson

Our task in the seminar is set by two immense works of twentieth-century fiction, which stand at opposite ends of the period, offering strong contrast as well as mutual illumination.  For each of the fourteen weeks of the semester, we will read the novels side by side, with no shrinking from their difficulty and no shyness before the pleasure they offer. James Joyce’s Ulysses can be seen as the summit of Modernism. David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest forces the question of Postmodernism.  Such large issues of period and category, as well as questions of narrative form, theory of character, literary ethics and the politics of imagination, will circulate for us throughout the term. But they will be no more central than specific phrases, sentences, and parts of words.  There are no prerequisites for the course, but it will be important for students to bring their curiosity, obsession, and openness.  Requirements include a presentation, weekly comments, and a final essay.

ENMC 4530 Seminar in Modern Studies: Medicine and Culture

930-1045 TR - NAU 242
Instructor: Karen Chase

We adopt the view that the arts and sciences provide alternate routes towards a common endeavor, to observe and comprehend human beings, their inner workings and social engagements in so far as either is healthy or diseased. George Eliot’s Tertius Lydgate states the ideal, when he claims that “the medical profession as it might be was the finest in the world; presenting the most perfect interchange between science and art; offering the most direct alliance between intellectual conquest and the social good” (Ch.15, Middlemarch). Today’s culture draws heavily from medical tropes, in metaphors, images, and conceits. Similarly, within the world of disease and treatment, the arts are alive and strong. Patients are encouraged to draw, write or listen to music. Art is recognized as part of the diagnosis (case history), and part of the treatment, or cure. We will examine the style, function, purpose and meaning of popular medical literature as it is published in fiction and non-fiction, produced in film, and as journalists, practitioners, researchers, patients, or other patient-carers write it. Requirements include a presentation, weekly comments, very active participation, and a substantial project to be decided in consultation with me.

American Literature

ENAM 3500 Studies in American Literature:Harlem Stories: Literature and Culture of the Modern World

930-1045 TR - BRYAN 328
Instructor: Sandhya Shukla

Since its earliest beginnings Harlem has been many things to many people: global capital of blackness, prototypical ethnic enclave, symbolic site for all kinds of migrancy.  And it has been made by a range of encounters between and among African American, Caribbean, African, Puerto Rican, Italian, Mexican and other peoples over time.  Understanding this wild multiplicity is a central aim of this course.  We shall read all kinds of stories of Harlem, and ask how Harlem represents itself and how representation shapes the experience of place.  Representation, we will assume, takes shape within and also outside of physical boundaries, and we will pay particular attention to the ways that stories are simultaneously lived and circulating.  This course critically considers the concepts of space and time, and how a variety of disciplinary techniques offer different renditions of Harlem.  Texts to be considered may include: Chester Himes’s, A Rage in Harlem, Mat Johnson’s Hunting in Harlem, Nella Larsen’s Quicksand and Passing, Claude McKay’s Home to Harlem, Toni Morrison’s Jazz, Ernesto Quinones’s Chango’s Fire, and Piri Thomas’s Down These Mean Streets.

ENAM 3500 Studies in American Literature: American Supernatural

500-615 TR - CABELL 168
Instructor:  Emily Ogden

Nineteenth-century America saw an extraordinary flowering of occult sciences that sought to explain the mysteries of life, personality, the cosmos, and death.  In this course, we will read both occult treatises and supernatural fiction. We will test the proposition that magic is about the problem of influence: about the way people should influence each other, and the way they actually do; about the kinds of persuasion we think show respect for another person's autonomy, and the kinds (such as, in our own day, brainwashing and cultic worship) we think show a lack of such respect. The magician is the person who has an extraordinary—and sometimes an unnatural, immoral, and evil—influence over others.  So the way a culture imagines magicians tells us something very important about it: it tells us the kinds of influence it fears, respects, even desires.  We will spend time poring over forgotten occult texts and old newspaper accounts of modern miracles, as well as delving into the fiction of Edgar Allan Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, Elizabeth Stuart Phelps, and Henry James.  The hope is to understand the real nineteenth-century America through the magic it imagined.

ENAM 3500 Advanced Studies in American Literature: Black Protest Narrative

1100-1215 TR - CABELL 132
Instructor: Marlon Ross

This course studies modern racial protest expressed through African American narrative art (fiction, autobiography, film) from the 1930s to 1980s, focusing on Civil Rights, Black Power, Black Panthers, womanism, and black gay/lesbian liberation movements. We explore the media, forms, and theories of modern protest movements, how they shaped and have been shaped by literature and film. What does it mean to lodge a protest in artistic form? What is the relation between political protest and aesthetic form? Some themes include lynching, segregation, sharecropping, anti-Semitism, black communism, migration, urbanization, religion (including Nation of Islam), crime and policing, normative and queer sexualities, war and military service, cross-racial coalitions, and the role of the individual in social change. Some major works include Richard Wright’s Native Son, Angelo Herndon’s Let Me Live, Ann Petry’s The Street, James Baldwin’s Go Tell It on the Mountain, Gwendolyn Brooks’ Maud Martha, Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Stride toward Freedom, Alice Walker’s Meridian, Bobby Seale’s Seize the Time, and Audre Lorde’s Zami, as well as pertinent readings in history, literary criticism, journalism, and sociology. We’ll study the cross-over film No Way Out, the black independent films Melvin Van eebles’ Sweet Sweetback’s Baadasssss Song, and Marlon Riggs’ Tongues Untied. Requirements include heavy reading schedule, midterm, final exam, and reading journal.

ENAM 3500 Advanced Studies in American Literature: The Civil Rights Movement

330-445 TR - MINOR 118
Instructor: Deborah McDowell

ENAM 3510 Studies in African-American Literature and Culture

1200-11250 MWF - PHYS 210
Instructor: Maurice Wallace

The voice and vision of James Baldwin, one of the twentieth century's most impassioned and prolific voices on race, sex, democracy and art, are the subjects of this course. A brilliant essayist, a controversial novelist, playwright and sometime poet, Baldwin is not only among the missing subjects of American civil rights history, he anticipated many of the contemporary concerns of American and African American literature and cultural studies, including, especially, American identity politics. In this course we will look to Baldwin's fiction, nonfiction and dramatic worlds for an early protocol of cultural critique foregrounding themes of race, class, gender, citizenship, black expatriation, the moral lives of children and urgency of art.

ENAM 3750 Sex and Sentiment

330-445 TR - CABELL 168
Instructor: Emily Ogden

"Do's and Don'ts for the Unmarried Woman" would be a fitting subtitle for many of the best-selling novels of nineteenth-century America.  The texts we study in this course point out the paths that lead to Christian virtue, matrimony, and a happy home, and warn against the transgressions—especially sex out of wedlock—that lead to prostitution and the grave.  Why do these novels matter now, when sexual morals have changed so much? Of course, they tell us something about the limitations on women's lives in an earlier period.  But they also have a lot to say about what it means, more generally, to be a human being with some freedom of choice. They ask how we know when to act on our desires, and when to refrain; they wonder how much willpower we need to get by; they ask how to make a good life when cast out in the wide, wide world. Nineteenth-century stories of women's lives are about more than what women should do with their virginity; they are about what anyone should do with his or her free will. Course texts may include tales of sentiment like Catharine Maria Sedgwick's A New-England Tale and Maria Susanna Cummins' The Lamplighter; and narratives of scandal, sex, and seduction like Susanna Rowson's Charlotte Temple, George Thompson's City Crimes, and William Wells Brown's Clotel.

ENAM 3880 Literature of the South

LECTURE: 1000-1050 MW - MINOR 125
Instructor: Jennifer Greeson

Across the 20th century and into the 21st, Americans negotiating the transformations of modernity and postmodernity have turned to literary representations of the South to get their bearings.  In imagining the South we seek a rooted, enduring culture in a sea of commercialism and mobility; we confront the persistence of racial and economic inequality at odds with the ideals of the United States; we insist upon the importance of locality in our increasingly global consciousnesses.  We also consume “the South” as a commodity, invoke it as an excuse or alibi for the nation’s ills, and enjoy its ostensible perversity as a guilty pleasure.  In this course we will read some of the most challenging, startling, and beautiful American prose fiction of the past 100 years, while attending as well to the broader cultural field of film, image, and music of which it is a part.  We will think in particular about questions of nationalism and literature (the role of “folk” culture; the location of poverty; place and race); questions of representation and representativeness (“identity” of writers; authenticity; production and presentation of Southern stuff); and questions of performance (of class, gender, race, and region).  Major authors will include Chesnutt, Faulkner, Caldwell, Porter, Wright, Welty, Hurston, Percy, and O'Connor.

ENAM 4500 Seminar in American Literature: Autobiography and Nationalism: Writing an American Self

1230-145 MW - BRYAN 233
Instructor: Jennifer Greeson

This course tracks the simultaneous emergence of the genre of autobiography with that of the United States of America itself. Since the colonial settlement of North America, life writing has been a primary mode through which writers pose the question, "What is an American?"  To tease out the connections between writing the self and writing the nation in the United States, we will read a historical survey of American autobiographies from the late seventeenth to the late twentieth century.  At the same time that we read for historical change and social context in these books, we will also ask overarching questions about memory, narrative, and truth.  Although "autobiography" is a literary term, we will explore the ways in which life writing has always had significance beyond literary studies--and this is true particularly in our own time, when human perception is understood to be radically subjective, even as the autonomy and unity of the individual has been called into question as never before.

Writing for this course will be somewhat different.  You will create a portfolio of short (generally, 3-4 pages apiece) written pieces in response to assignments designed to break down boundaries between “critical” and “creative” writing--between public and private forms of address, between the voice of the critic and the voices about which he or she writes.  This experimental critical writing is designed to make us rethink the project of literary criticism and how we ourselves are interpolated into it.  We’ll try to rediscover the place in the criticism we write for the “I,” for the autobiographical imperative.

ENAM 5840 Contemporary African-American Literature

930-1045 TR - NAU 142
Instructor: Lisa Woolfork

This seminar uses the concept of time as a foundation for exploring selected works of contemporary African American Literature. Time is a useful representational concept in so far as it allows for a wide-ranging assessment of literary and cultural tropes. Time is a noun and a verb; it is the basis for history. It can be on our side or we can lack what seems sufficient.  It can heal all wounds or it can be a wound itself. These are the types of questions that will be used as a beginning for larger and evolving conversations about the works listed below. The course is also committed to helping students develop their own research agenda through formation of a culminating seminar paper.  Writers studied include Percival Everett, Jesmyn Ward, Edward P Jones, and Toni Morrison.

Genre Studies

ENGN 4500 Advanced Studies in Literary Genres

330-445 MW - BRYAN 310
Instructor: Stephen Railton

English Language Studies

ENLS 3030 History of the English Language

200-315 MW - DELL 1 105
Instructor: Peter Baker

This course will introduce you to the history of the English language from several perspectives. We will be concerned with the language’s “internal history” (what actually happened to its sounds, grammar and vocabulary), but we will also study how and why languages change and, more specifically, the “external history” of English (the cultural and historical contexts that have produced change). The course begins with the Indo-European and Germanic background of English, and we will spend some time with the language as it developed in the British Isles. In the second half of the term we will study the development of American English (not completely forgetting other varieties around the world): its divergence from British English, the development of regional, racial and ethnic varieties, and the emergence in the twentieth century of a national “standard.” At all times we will bear in mind that language is an aspect of social interaction, and when we study language change we are also studying social change. In-class exercises, mid-term and final exams, final project.

Criticism

ENCR 4500 Advanced Studies in Literary Criticism: Race, Space, and Culture

630-900 T - BRYAN 310
Instructors: Ian Grandison and Marlon Ross

Co-taught by K. Ian Grandison and Marlon Ross, this interdisciplinary seminar examines the spatial implications at work in the theories, practices, and experiences of race, as well as the cultural implications at stake in our apprehensions and conceptions of space. Themes include: 1) the human/nature threshold; 2) public domains/private lives; 3) urban renewal, historic preservation, and the new urbanism; 4) defensible design and the spatial politics of fear; and 5) the cultural ideologies of sustainability. The seminar foregrounds the multidimensionality of space as a physical, perceptual, social, ideological, and discursive phenomenon. This means melding concepts and practices used in the design professions with theories affiliated with race, postcolonial, literary, and cultural studies. We’ll investigate a variety of spaces, actual and discursive, through selected theoretical readings from diverse disciplines (e.g., William Cronon, Patricia Williams, Philip Deloria, Leslie Kanes Weisman, Gloria Anzaldua, Oscar Newman); through case studies (e.g., Indian reservations, burial grounds, suburban homes, gay bars, national monuments); and through local site visits. Requirements include a midterm and final
exam, one site visit response paper, and a major team research project and presentation.

ENCR 4500 Advanced Studies in Literary Criticism

330-445 TR - CABELL 211
Instructor: Walter Jost

ENCR 5650 Books as Physical Objects

1100-1215 MW - TBA
Instructor: David Vander Meulen

Special Topics in Literature

ENSP 2610 Point-of-View Journalism

500-615 MW - MINOR 130
Instructor: Lisa Goff

This course examines the history and practice of “point-of-view” journalism, a controversial but credible alternative to the dominant model of “objectivity” on the part of the news media. Now associated largely with blogging, point-of-view journalism has a history as long as the nation’s, from Tom Paine and Benjamin Franklin in the eighteenth century to Ida Tarbell, the original “muckraker,” in the nineteenth, and “New Journalism” practitioners like Tom Wolfe and Hunter Thompson in the twentieth. Current point-of-view practitioners include news organizations on the right (Fox News) and left (MSNBC), as well as prominent bloggers like Ta-Nehisi Coates in The Atlantic, or Egyptian feminist Mona Eltahawy. We will also consider two types of new media outside the traditional definition of “journalism”: so-called “advocacy” or “development journalists” who write for community news media or non-profit organizations; and “comic journalism,” a category that includes graphic art as a medium for news as well as the work of entertainers such as Jon Stewart and Steven Colbert, who pillory the news (and newsmakers) in order to interpret it.

ENSP 3559 New Course in Special Topics: Hacking for Humanists 

1100-1215 TR - BRYAN 235
Instructor: Brad Pasanek

This is a course for English majors (and other students) that introduces the basics of computer programming, text analysis, text encoding, and statistics as experimental methodologies that promote new kinds of reading and interpretation. The aim is to move from "computation into criticism." We'll work, primarily, with a Shakespeare play, poetry by William Blake, and a Jane Austen novel. Students will find these works at the bookstore alongside manuals on Learning Unix and Text Analysis with R. No prior familiarity with coding required; indeed, advanced computer science majors are discouraged from applying, as they will likely find the professor's halting and lame way with the algorithmic course content comic, at best. The term hacking, the humanist will note, has two senses at least.

ENSP 3610 Narratives of Illness and Doctoring

330-445 TR - BRYAN 328
Instructor: Marcia Childress

The experience of illness and the practice of medicine alike are steeped in stories, narrative being a fundamental way human beings make sense of ourselves, our experiences (including illness, loss, and healing), and our world. This course inquires into the intersection of narrative, literature, and medicine, looking especially at (1) stories of patients, families, and physicians about illness and doctoring; (2) interpretation of illness experience, narrative, and medicine; and (3) the growing significance of narrative in American medicine. We study narratives of many genres, styles, and voices that cover a range of illnesses/conditions and address issues in contemporary medicine and culture. Students participate in class discussion and outside events, write response papers, propose in writing and prepare a substantial paper/project, and write midterm and final exams.

ENSP 4500 The Sonnet Revised and Revisited

200-315 TR - CABELL 303
Instructor: Clare Kinney

“A moment’s monument”; “a meeting place of image and voice”; “a game with mortal stakes”; “a chamber of sudden change”; “the collision of music, desire and argument”: these are some of the ways that poets and critics have described the sonnet. Starting with the Petrarchan experiments of Renaissance Europe and extending our reach through the Romantics & the modernists to Ted Berrigan, Seamus Heaney, Carol Ann Duffy and beyond, we will consider the persistence and the many metamorphoses of the form. Sonnet writers deploy their “infinite riches in a little room” for religious, political, philosophical and meta-poetical purposes as well as to anatomize desire, and when they present sonnets in sequence they make lyric do something of the work of narrative. Every time a poet writes a sonnet he or she enters a very long literary conversation and may exploit that intervention as the occasion to set emotion and intellect in a new dialogue, to reconsider “the contradictory impulses of being in the world,” to talk back to tradition, to make the dead speak again, to re-make and re-break the rules of form. These are some of the starting points for the discussions of a course dedicated to the craftiness of craft and the passion of argument.

Requirements: regular email responses to readings, one 6-7 page paper, one final project (creative or critical), class presentation on a contemporary sonnet of your own choice.

ENSP 4500 Special Topics: Detective Fiction

200-315 MW - CABELL 303
Instructor: Stephen Railton

Who done it?  Poe, Doyle, Christie, Hammett, Macdonald, Sjowall and Wahloo, Grafton, Turow, and probably three or four others.  We'll read the fictions in chronological order, and one focus of the semester will be how the genre changes over time.  But our abiding focus will be on what the conventions of detective fiction can tell us about the questions that don't change much, including the mystery of death and the human quest for meaning.  Because this is a seminar, you'll help to shape our questions too, as well as the answers we'll try to arrive at.

ENSP 4800 The Bible

SECTION 001: 200-315 MW - DELL 1 104
SECTION 002: 330-445 MW - CHEM 262

Instructor: Stephen Cushman

The goal of this course is simple: to sample a range of stories and poems in the Bible, from Genesis to Revelation, so that readers and writers of English can recognize and appreciate allusions to them or echoes of them in other contexts, whether artistic or not.  No prior knowledge of the Bible needed or assumed.  All are welcome, as are all points of view, religious and secular.  Participants may choose to submit analytic work or creative work.

ENSP 5810 Film Aesthetics

1100-1215 TR - BRYAN 310
Restricted to 4th-Years, Graduate Students, Instructor Permission
Instructor: Walter Korte

Restricted to Fourth Years, Graduate Students, Instructor Permission.

ENSP 5810 is a course in film theory, criticism and visual thinking, in which we consider such issues as the nature of film language, the relationship between film and other arts, the psychology of spectatorship. We undertake a formal analysis of selected works by such filmmakers as Hitchcock, Coppola, Antonioni and Cronenberg. We will focus this semester on the work of David Lynch, with special emphasis on the surrealist and expressionist aspects of his cinema, and how the films relate to his work in painting, still photography, music, and theatre.

Course requirements include discussion participation, a final exam and a final critical paper.

ENSP 5820 Advanced Special Topics in Literature

TBA
Restricted to Instructor Permission
Instructors: Michael Levenson and Claire Kinney

"The Culture of London: Past and Present" offers an interdisciplinary approach to metropolitan culture, as an historically embedded object of inquiry. Located in London, it runs for a month each year from early June to early July. Faculty members from the University direct, teach and lead the class; they are complemented by London-based specialists in architecture, art history, religious studies and contemporary politics.

Related Courses in Other Departments

CPLT 2010 History of European Literature 1

LECTURE: 1230-145 TR - RUFFNER G004
Instructor: Paul Cantor
Cross-listed with ENGL 2020

This course surveys European literature from its origins in Ancient Greece through the Renaissance. As a course in literary history, it seeks to develop an understanding of period concepts, such as Medieval and Renaissance, as well as concepts of genre, such as epic, tragedy, and comedy.  Readings include (sometimes in the form of selections) the Iliad, the Odyssey, the Oresteia, Oedipus, Antigone, the Aeneid, the Inferno, Gargantua and Pantagruel, Hamlet, and Don Quixote. All foreign language works will be read in English translation.  Requirements: three papers and a final examination.  Two lectures and one section meeting per week.  This course satisfies the Second Writing Requirement and can be counted toward the English major for 3 hours of "Literature in Translation."