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Undergraduate Course Descriptions - Fall 2016

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English Surveys

Introductory Seminars in Literature

Academic and Professional Writing

Creative Writing

Poetry Writing Program

Medieval Literature

Renaissance Literature

Restoration and 18th Century Literature

19th Century British Literature

Modern and Contemporary Literature

American Literature

Genre Studies

Language Studies

Criticism

Special Topics in Literature

Related Courses in Other Departments

English Surveys

ENGL 1500 - Masterworks of Literature

Section 001 - Shakespeare's Rome

TR 330-445 (New Cabell 058)
Instructor: Paul Cantor

This course will study ancient Rome in Shakespeare’s representation of it. We will read some Roman history as background and then ask whether Shakespeare portrays the ancient city accurately in his Roman plays: Coriolanus, Julius Caesar, and Antony and Cleopatra. We will also consider the place of Rome in Shakespeare’s imaginative universe as a whole. By reading Cymbeline, Henry V, and Hamlet, we will explore Shakespeare’s understanding of the influence of Rome on later history. In short, we will study how the greatest author of the Renaissance reacted to and recreated the greatest power in the ancient world.

Section 003 - Routes, Writing, Reggae (Combined with AAS 1559)

TR 330-445 (Gilmer 141)
Instructor: Njelle Hamilton

In this course, we will explore the history of reggae music and its influence on the development of autochthonous Jamaican literature. In addition to readings on Jamaican history, Rastafarianism, and Haile Selassie I, we will listen to and analyze reggae and dancehall songs to discern the themes, poetic devices, musical structures, and social and historical contexts of the music form, with a view to mapping what reggae lends to Jamaican literature and literary culture. Our course readings will range from dub poetry by Jean Binta Breeze and Mutabaruka, reggae poetry by Kamau Brathwaite and Kwame Dawes, reggae short fiction from Geoffrey Philp and Colin Channer, and reggae  novels from Michael Thelwell (The Harder They Come) and the Booker prize winner Marlon James (A Brief History of Seven Killings).  Assignments include: listening and reading journals,  musical and literary biographies and reviews, and an analytical final essay.

Section 200 - "The Literature of Fantasy: From Middle Earth to the Seven Kingdoms"

MW 200-250 (Nau 101)
Instructor: Bruce Holsinger

This lecture course explores the wondrous and magical world of modern fantasy literature, from JRR Tolkien's Middle Earth to the Hogwarts of Harry Potter, from the Arthurian realm of Marion Zimmer Bradley's "The Mists of Avalon" to George RR Martin's Seven Kingdoms in "Game of Thrones." The course will include a fair amount of background reading in the medieval works (epics, Arthurian romances, etc.) that inspire modern fantasy, as well as fantasy's extra-literary afterlives in gaming (Dungeons & Dragons; World of Warcraft) and film adaptations. Requirements will include a midterm, a final, and several short writing assignments.

Discussion Sections:

Section 201
W 400-450 (Shannon House 109)
Instructor: Alison Glassie

Section 202
W 500-550 (Shannon House 109)
Instructor: Alison Glassie

Section 203
W 600-650 (New Cabell 056)
Instructor: Carol Guarnieri

Section 204
W 700-750 (New Cabell 056)
Instructor: Carol Guarnieri

Section 207
R 600-650 (Shannon House 109)
Instructor: Adam Friedgen

Section 208
R 700-750 (Shannon House 109)
Instructor: Adam Friedgen

Section 209
F 1200-1250 (Pavilion VIII 103)
Instructor: Peter Miller

Section 210
F 100-150 (Pavilion VIII 103)
Instructor: Peter Miller

ENGL 2010 - History of European Literature I (4 Credits)

Lecture:
TR 330-445 (Claud Moore Nursing Education Building - G010)
Instructor: Walter Jost
Cross-listed with CPLT 2010

Discussion Sections:

Section 101
F 1000-1050 (Astronomy Building 265)
Instructor: Christian Howard

Section 102
R 500-550 (New Cabell 415)
Instructor: Christian Howard

Section 103
R 600-650 (Wilson 244)

Section 104
F 1100-1150 (New Cabell 066)

ENGL 3810 - History of Literatures in English I

Lecture:
MW 1100-1150 (Maury 209)
Instructor: John Parker

We will start in the tenth century and end in the eighteenth, by which time you will have read some of the most powerful texts that Old, Middle and modern English have to offer: from anonymous poems in Anglo-Saxon to The Canterbury Tales of Geoffrey Chaucer; from the epic of John Milton to the mock-epic of Alexander Pope; drama from the medieval biblical cycles to Shakespeare and the Restoration; from the metaphysical conceits of John Donne to the scatological satire of Jonathan Swift.  The topics we'll cover are as diverse as the texts themselves, but certain questions loom large over the whole: should English literature take as its model the pagan classics or Christian scripture?  If it tries to take both, how are these at all compatible?  Economic and sexual concerns will be paramount.  Is money the root of all evil or is it God?  Is love love or is it war?  What about marriage?  We will repeatedly have to ask what it means to live with a consciousness not very happily related to its own embodiment.  What happens when we die?  Does literature offer a form of immortality and a forum for truth or is it a fraud?

Discussion Sections:

Section 101
R 1230-120 (New Cabell 415)
Instructor: Gretchen York

Section 102
W 330-420 (Maury 113)
Instructor: DeVan Ard

Section 103
W 200-250 (Room TBA)
Instructor: DeVan Ard

Section 104
R 200-250 (Room TBA)
Instructor: Gretchen York

Section 105
R 330-420 (Astronomy Building 265)
Instructor: Gretchen York

Section 106
R 500-550 (Wilson 238)
Instructor: Gretchen York

Section 110
W 200-250 (Room TBA)
Instructor: James Ascher

Section 112
W 330-420 (New Cabell 395)
Instructor: Emily Keyser

Section 113
W 500-550 (Wilson 244)
Instructor: Emily Keyser

Section 115
F 200-250 (Wilson 244)
Instructor: Zachary Stone

Section 116
W 630-720 (Bryan 334)
Instructor: Sarah Storti

Section 117
W 330-420 (Minor 130)
Instructor: James Ascher

Section 118
R 600-650 (New Cabell 287)
Instructor: Sarah Storti

Section 119
R 330-420 (Maury 110)
Instructor: Zachary Stone

Section 120
W 400-450 (New Cabell 115)
Instructor: Casey Ireland

Section 121
W 700-750 (New Cabell 183)
Instructor: Casey Ireland

ENGL 4998 - Distinguished Majors Program

Time/Location TBA
Instructor: Karen Chase Levenson

Directed research leading to completion of an extended essay to be submitted to the Honors Committee. Both courses are required of honors candidates. Graded on a year-long basis.  For more details on this class, please visit the department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/undergraduate/distinguishedmajors.

Introductory Seminars in Literature

ENLT 2100 - Introduction to Literary Studies

Section 007
MWF 1000-1050 (Bryan 310)
Instructor: Peter Baker

ENLT 2514 - Modern American Authors

Section 001 - The Western & the West
TR 330-445 (Bryan 330)
Instructor: Ethan Reed

Posses, shootouts, and the frontier–loners, violence, and the law. Or is it family, legacy, and society–storytellers, safety, and a warm hearth? What is a western? What is the West, and why do we keep writing stories about it? This course explores where myth and reality meet on the horizon of the Amer. West, the staying power of the genre that was imagined out of it, and how modern writers adapt, challenge, and disrupt the legacies of both.

ENLT 2523 - Studies in Poetry

Section 001 - Hallowed Ground: Poetry's Graveyard School
MW 500-615 (Bryan 330)
Instructor: Andrew Stauffer

For its past 250 years or so, lyric poetry in the English and American traditions has shown a recurrent interest in landscapes marked by the dead: literal graveyards in some cases, figurative ones in others.  Why the attraction, and what does it say about ideas of poetry’s origins and ends in the modern era? In this class, we will be reading poetical works in the long wake of Thomas Gray’s “Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard,” going through the Romantic, Victorian, and Modernist eras to end in the present day with the work of local poets here in Virginia. We will be interested in genre (e.g., elegy, pastoral, ode), in form (e.g., meter, rhyme, structure), and in language (e.g., diction, imagery, allusion), while also asking broader literary-historical questions about the terms of poetry’s engagement with history, nature, emotion, faith, and loss. How do poems help us speak to the dead, and through them, and ultimately with them, as we confront our own mortality? Three papers and a final exam.

Section 002 - Introduction to Poetry
TR 930-1045 (Bryan 332)
Instructor: Matthew Davis

This course is for students who have little or no previous experience reading poetry. In the first few classes we will learn some strategies for making sense of poetry, including re-arranging verse sentences in normal (subject-verb-object) word order and looking up words and concepts – both online and using dictionaries. We will also begin to learn about meter, rhyme, and stanzaic forms. In the second and longer part of the course, we will study some great poems by classic authors. We will probably study six to eight of the following authors: Wordsworth, Keats, Shelley, Housman, Browning, Kipling, C. Rossetti, Dickinson, Hardy, Yeats, Frost, Eliot, Auden. The emphasis will be on poetry written from roughly 1800 to 1950, rather than older poetry or contemporary verse, on lyric and shorter poems rather than narrative and longer poems, and on accentual-syllabic verse, as opposed to free verse. 

ENLT 2524 - Studies in Drama

Section 001 - Political Theater
T 330-600 (Maury 113)
Instructor: Kelli Shermeyer

This course examines the intersections of theater and politics in a diverse body of dramatic works. We will talk about the way drama represents political conflict, examine the theater’s role in political action (and in the theorizing of political action), and discuss the ways that performance and spectacle are activated in our contemporary political arena. Be prepared for lively discussion and performance possibilities within our own classroom! Readings may include Brectht’s The Measures Taken, Weiss’ Marat/Sade, Soyinka’s Death and the King’s Horseman, Fugard’s The Island, Sophocles’ Antigone, Churchill’s Cloud 9, Friel’s Translations, McDonagh’s The Lieutenant of Inishmore, Greig’s Dunsinane, and as well as excerpts from theoretical texts on the theatre such as Brecht’s A Short Organum for the Theatre, Artaud’s Theatre of Cruelty, and Boal’s The Theatre of the Oppressed.

ENLT 2526 - Studies in Fiction

Section 001 - Contemporary Short Fiction
MW 330-445 (Bryan 310)
Instructor: Victoria Olwell

We’re lucky to live in a vibrant literary culture, and in this course, we’ll explore one facet of that culture – short fiction. After grounding our knowledge of the genre in nineteenth- and twentieth-century classics of short fiction, we'll turn our attention to recent work. Studying a range of short fiction by authors writing today, we'll consider how short fiction provides a source of pleasure and knowledge that is integral to the buzzing public conversations we call "culture." Attendance, participation, four 5-page papers, and a final exam are required.

Section 002 - Jane Austen Jumps the Shark
TR 1230-145 (New Cabell 364)
Instructor: Bradley Pasanek

This study of Jane Austen’s afterlife finds the Regency author on water-skis. An introduction to the major, the course aims at formal analyses of the novel form, queries the concept of fiction, and presents the rudiments of literary theory. The student must be prepared to sample unpardonably callow adaptations of adaptations of adaptations. Beware: common side effects may include Darcymania, zombification, fandom, and queer theory. To be sure, we will be reading Austen meticulously; our other authors closely, but more quickly and in greater bulk. Of concern will be contemporary reworkings of Austen: her screen adaptations, her commodification, and the many parodic uses to which her fictions have been put, online and off. Readings will likely include Austen’s juvenilia, at least three of the six major novels, Bridget Jones’s Diary, an offering from Quirk Press, Lost in Austen, a squat volume of mass-marketed pulpy filth, and several amateur slash efforts.

Section 003 - Fictions of Anxiety
TR 330-445 (New Cabell 338)
Instructor: Lara Musser

This course looks at the way fiction continues to be used as a vessel for parsing anxieties of science, “progress”, and the shifting boundaries of how we define “humanness”. We trace an arc from Frankenstein to present-day dystopian lit. We question fiction’s efficacy as a moral “thought-experiment”, the limits of the scientific imagination, and what stakes arise in deciding who or what is alive.

Section 004 - Apocalypse Soon: Fins of Siècles
TR 930-1045 (Bryan 310)
Instructor: Sarah Berkowitz

When centuries draw to their close, readers and writers tend to get anxious. We look at anxious authors anticipating end of days (or perhaps just the end of an era), and consider how culture reflects the geists of our zeit. By looking at the novels and films of the end of the last two centuries, we will ask how does culture reflect our anxieties, and how does it help us transcend them?

ENLT 2547 - Black Writers in America

Section 001 - Black Women Writers
TR 800-915 (Nau 142)
Instructor: Lisa Woolfork

This seminar uses Black women’s writings from mid-century to the present to introduce new English majors to important concepts in literary analysis. To better understand genre, themes, and assorted literary conventions, we will focus closely on a range of literary styles.  We will also consider patterns of representation established in the 1950s and watch how they develop, disintegrate, or evolve into the present day.  Do certain issues or themes remain important in Black women’s writing of the last fifty years?  How has the literature adapted in response to specific cultural or historical moments?

ENLT 2548 - Contemporary Literature

Section 001 - Lyric in Contemporary Literature and Music
TR 330-445 (New Cabell 395)
Instructor: Caleb Agnew

This class will attempt to define the contours of lyric poetry in the Twenty-First Century, paying atttention both to major contemporary poets in the academic landscape and to critically-acclaimed popular musical artists. We will open a dialogue about the perceived difficulties of contemporary written poetry against the perceived accessibility of major musical artists, engaging with one artist's volume or album per week in chronological order.

ENLT 2550 - Shakespeare

Section 002
TR 930-1045 (Bryan 330)
Instructor: Dan Kinney

Reading one play a week, we will survey the shapes of Shakespearean creation and the way they reshape and reflect on Creation as given and preached, on shared meanings as studied and lived. How important are genres and source-texts for filtering and framing Shakespeare's own understandings? How does Shakespeare the poet and playwright position his worlds in relation to outside reality?  Class requirements: Lively participation including occasional email responses, one short and one longer essay, and a final exam.

ENLT 2552 - Women in Literature

Section 001 - Gaskell and the Brontes
MWF 900-950 (Bryan 310)
Instructor: Grace Vasington

Narrowing in on the wealth of female authorship in the late 1840s and 1850s, this course begins with Gaskell’s extraordinary biography of Charlotte Brontë and her sisters, and then backtracks to examine the writings of both female contemporaries and critical commentaries of the era. We will consider such topics as literary vocation, political rhetoric, and the competing threads of realism and romance that mark many of their works.

ENLT 2555 - Special Topics

Section 001 - Becoming Your True Self
TR 200-315 (Bryan 330)
Instructor: Walter Jost

Section 002 - Narratives of Contact in American Fiction & Media
TR 930-1045 (Bryan 312)
Instructor: Sophie Abramowitz

Using literature, journalism, and visual and sonic media that address a diverse array of American environments, we will explore the ways that American identity is imagined, produced, and contested through the paradigm of contact. By focalizing the narrative place of race, gender, class, and citizenship, this course asks students to critically consider how "newness," difference, and moments of (mis)recognition construct American personhood.

Section 003 - Landscapes of Black Education
TR 330-445 (Bryan 328)
Instructor: Kenrick Grandison

This course examines how seemingly ordinary spaces and places around us, “landscapes,” are involved in the struggle to democratize education in the United States.  It focuses on African American education.  We explore how landscape is implicated in the secret prehistory of Black education under enslavement; the promise of public education during Reconstruction; Booker T. Washington’s accommodation during early Jim Crow; black college campus rebellions of the 1920s; the impact of Brown v. Board of Education, the rise of black studies programs at majority campuses in the 1960s and ‘70s; and the persistence of separate and unequal education in our current moment. We also touch on the experience of other marginalized groups, especially Native Americans and women.  For example, women’s college campuses, such as those of Mount Holyoke and Smith College, were designed to discipline women to accept prescribed gender roles at the height of the women’s suffrage movement.  There is a mandatory field trip to Richmond, via which we’ll apply our classroom knowledge to interrogate the campuses of several educational institutions, including Carver Elementary School, Maggie Walker Governor’s School, and Virginia Union University in their setting of Jackson Ward, once celebrated as Virginia’s Harlem.  Some of the materials include excerpts from the following: Frederick Douglass’ 1845 Narrative, Thomas Jefferson’s Notes on the State of Virginia, Booker T. Washington’s Up from Slavery, W. E. B. Du Bois’s Black Reconstruction in America, Raymond Wolters’ The New Negro on Campus, James D. Anderson’s The Education of Blacks in the South, and Helen Lefkowitz’s Alma Mater: Design and Experience in the Women’s Colleges. Films include With All Deliberate Speed and Honey-Coated Arsenic.  We’ll learn to read and use historical and contemporary maps, plans, and other design-related materials.  Assignments include a midterm, team-led student discussions, a team research project, a critical field trip reflection paper and revision, and a final critical reflection on the team project.

Section 004 - Literature and Culture of the American Frontier
TR 330-445 (Bryan 332)
Instructor: Eva Latterner

The borderland known as the “frontier” has occupied the American imagination since the first European settlements in the New World. This course will interrogate how the frontier has been imagined as a space of national desire, dread, enterprise and experimentation from the Kansas-Nebraska Act to the contemporary Western. Considering US legal discourse, fiction, essays, films and Marlboro ads, we will examine the frontier as a cultural object.

Section 005 - Beauty and Monstrosity
MW 200-315 (Dell 2 100)
Instructor: Jon D'Errico

Section 006 - Shakespeare
MW 330-445 (Bryan 332)
Instructor: Katharine Maus

In this ENLT we will read three Shakespeare plays and then see two or three film or live-theater versions of each one, considering various ways the directors and actors interpret the plays for a modern audience. Writing assignments are designed to help seminar participants consolidate the analytical and writing skills they need to succeed in college-level classes in English or other humanities fields. In addition to many short, informal writing assignments there will be two formal papers—one short, one longer.

Section 007 - Latina/o Fiction and Film
TR 1100-1215 (Bryan Hall 235)
Instructor: Carmen Lamas

The purpose of this course is to understand the diverse and also converging experiences of different Latino groups in the US. We will read contemporary novels, poetry and essays by Latina/o authors from different groups. Themes we will discuss include the historical and political realities that led to the formation and/or migration of different groups, concepts of the “border”, and the impact of bilingualism and Spanglish on group identity.

Section 008 - The Vicious Arts
TR 200-315 (New Cabell 411)
Instructor: Stephen Hequembourg

Section 009 - The Bestiary from Antiquity to Today
MW 200-315 (New Cabell 395)
Instructor: Elizabeth Sutherland

This class will explore the ancient practice of cataloguing, describing, and interpreting animals. From Pliny to the Aberdeen Bestiary to Borges to Caspar Henderson to Sir David Attenborough—writers and thinkers have engaged with the natural sciences by creating compendia of animals: bestiaries. We will explore what it means to "write animals," drawing on contemporary animal studies scholarship as well as ancient and medieval folklore. We will also think about the relationship of the beast fable to the bestiary. How do these proto-zoological books relate to anthropomorphic tales featuring animals? Many bestiaries include legendary and/or monstrous creatures. Why does this genre lend itself so easily to the fantastic? Why do The Lord of the Rings and the Harry Potter series have their own bestiaries? What relevance does the bestiary have for our world of ever-decreasing biodiversity? Not until the 19th century did scientists begin to realize that extinction was possible, had happened, and was continuing to happen. How does the bestiary genre change after this shift? How might beast-writing matter more than ever in the twenty-first century?

Academic and Professional Writing

ENWR 1505 - Writing and Critical Inquiry: Stretch I

Section Locations Variable
Fall Semesters

The first half of the "stretch" (two-semester) option for meeting the First Writing Requirement—intended to be taken during the first semester of study—this course approaches writing as a way of generating, representing, and reflecting on critical inquiry. Graded A, B, C, or NC.  Students who take ENWR 1505 must subsequently take ENWR 1506 to complete the First Writing Requirement.

ENWR 1506 - Writing and Critical Inquiry: Stretch II

Section Locations Variable
Spring Semesters

The second half of the "stretch" (two-semester) option for meeting the First Writing Requirement—intended to be taken during the second semester of study—this course approaches writing as a way of generating, representing, and reflecting on critical inquiry. Graded A, B, C, or NC.  Students who take ENWR 1506 should have taken ENWR 1505 in the prior semester to complete the First Writing Requirement.

ENWR 1507 - Writing and Critical Inquiry: Stretch I for Multilingual Writers

Section Locations Variable
Fall Semesters

The first half of the "stretch" (two-semester) option for students still developing competency at writing in English, this course approaches writing as a way of generating, representing, and reflecting on critical inquiry. Intended to be taken during the first semester of study; graded A, B, C, or NC.  Students who take ENWR 1507 must subsequently take ENWR 1508 to complete the First Writing Requirement.

ENWR 1508 - Writing and Critical Inquiry: Stretch II for Multilingual Writers

Section Locations Variable
Spring Semesters

The second half of the "stretch" (two-semester) option for students still developing competency at writing in English, this course approaches writing as a way of generating, representing, and reflecting on critical inquiry. Intended to be taken during the second semester of study; graded A, B, C, or NC.  Students who take ENWR 1508 should have taken ENWR 1507 in the prior semester to complete the First Writing Requirement.

ENWR 1510 - Writing and Critical Inquiry

Section Locations Variable
Fall and Spring Semesters

The single-semester option for meeting the first writing requirement—intended to be taken during the first year of study—this course approaches writing as a way of generating, representing, and reflecting on critical inquiry. Graded A, B, C, or NC. Students whose last names end in A-K must take ENWR 1510 in the fall; those with last names ending in L-Z take it in the spring.

ENWR 2510 - Advanced Academic Writing

Section 001 - Writing and Inquiry
TR 1230-145 (New Cabell 066)
Instructor: Kate Kostelnik

This course will provide a foundation into the various kinds of writing students will learn and practice in the university.  We will inquire into how writing works, how we grow as writers as we progress through college, as well as how writing is a distinct form of learning.  Particular attention will be paid to rhetorical awareness and considerations of our writing processes.

Section 002 - Writing about Medicine
MWF 900-950 (New Cabell 066)
Instructor: Kiera Allison

This tutorial-style writing seminar will feature readings on current medical research and practice and will give students practice writing in the same mode.

Section 003 - Writing about Medicine
MWF 1100-1150 (Dell 1 104)
Instructor: Kiera Allison

This tutorial-style writing seminar will feature readings on current medical research and practice and will give students practice writing in the same mode.

ENWR 2520 - Special Topics in Writing

Section 001 - Words Doing Work
TR 1100-1215 (Shannon House 108)
Instructor: Devin Donovan

In fulfillment of the second writing requirement, this course will critically examine writing in and about the workplace. We'll start by looking at writing as its own type of work before moving into how language can help us see work differently. Building on this foundation, the second and third units will draw on students' unique interests and career goals to navigate and analyze the communications of the workplaces they one day hope to enter.

Section 002 - Writing the Environment
MWF 100-150 (New Cabell 315)
Instructor: Cory Shaman

This class takes a close look at the ethics and rhetoric involved with writing the environment. We’ll examine a representative cross-section of texts from different disciplinary perspectives that range from the formal to the informal and the personal to the professional and that cover a diverse collection of environmental issues from agriculture and food to conservation and toxic pollution.

Section 004 - Travel Writing
MWF 200-250 (Shannon House 108)
Instructor: Sarah Stephenson

This course will explore travel writing using a variety of texts, including essays, memoirs, blogs, photo essays, and narratives. We will examine cultural representations of travel as well as the ethical implications of tourism. Students will have the opportunity to write about their own travel experiences, and we will also embark on “local travel” of our own.

Section 006 - Writing about Social Justice
MWF 900-950 (New Cabell 287)
Instructor: Lindgren Johnson

This course will consider the rhetorical role witnessing—so central in both a legal and a religious context--plays in the movement for racial justice. Who is an effective witness, and why—and what, exactly, must be witnessed? Texts we will consider include theoretical ones such as Susan Sontag’s On Regarding the Pain of Others, in addition to primary written, visual, sonic, and cinematic ones.

ENWR 2610 - Writing with Style

Section 001
TR 500-615 (Bryan 334)
Instructor: Keith Driver

Develops an understanding of the wide range of stylistic moves in prose writing, their uses, and implications. Students build a rich vocabulary for describing stylistic decisions, imitate and analyze exemplary writing, and discuss each other¿s writing in a workshop setting.

Fullfills the second writing requirement.

ENWR 2700 - News Writing

Section 001 (Combined with MDST 2700-001)
TR 930-1045 (Bryan 203)
Instructor: Charles Kelly

Development of basic writing skills, with craftsmanship the emphasis. Study, discussion and rewrite of old and new media stories. Workshop setting. Readings from texts and various other sources. Progress from short hard-news pieces through speech stories, legislative and political coverage, to use of narrative and on to features in general. Repeated writing drills. Essential to follow current events as well. Satisfies second writing requirement.

Section 002 (Combined with MDST 2700-002)
TR 800-915 (Bryan 203)
Instructor: Charles Kelly

Development of basic writing skills, with craftsmanship the emphasis. Study, discussion and rewrite of old and new media stories. Workshop setting. Readings from texts and various other sources. Progress from short hard-news pieces through speech stories, legislative and political coverage, to use of narrative and on to features in general. Repeated writing drills. Essential to follow current events as well. Satisfies second writing requirement.

ENWR 3640 - Writing with Sound

Section 001
TR 1100-1215 (Gibson 242)
Instructor: Steph Ceraso

This course trains students to become attuned, thoughtful listeners and sonic composers. In addition to discussing key works on sound from fields such as rhetoric and composition, sound studies, and journalism, we will experiment with the possibilities of sound as a valuable form of writing and storytelling. Students will learn how to use digital audio editing tools, platforms, and techniques for designing and producing sonic projects.

ENWR 3900 - Communicating with the Public

Section 001
MWF 1100-1150 (Bryan 334)
Instructor: Jon D'Errico

The lectures cover topics in effective public communication, including the cognitive effects of sentence syntax, core principles of document design, framing arguments in public documents, and developing effective visuals and presentations. The studios allow students to master those principles in the context of projects keyed to their specific interests, background, and career plans. Meets the second writing requirement.

Section 002
MWF 1200-1250 (Bryan 334)
Instructor: Jon D'Errico

The lectures cover topics in effective public communication, including the cognitive effects of sentence syntax, core principles of document design, framing arguments in public documents, and developing effective visuals and presentations. The studios allow students to master those principles in the context of projects keyed to their specific interests, background, and career plans. Meets the second writing requirement.

Creative Writing

ENCW 2300 - Poetry Writing

An introductory course in poetry writing, with a primary focus on creating new poems in a workshop setting. Students will study basic poetic terms and techniques and revise and arrange a series of poems for a final portfolio. The course will also have extensive outside reading and non-creative writing requirements.  While first- and second-years are the primary audience for ENCW 2300 and should register for the course using SIS, third- and fourth-year students can request to be added manually. For the add procedure (as well as other creative writing policies) see this page.

Section 001
MW 630-745 (Bryan 312)
Instructor: Valencia Grice

Section 002
TR 930-1045 (Ruffner 123)
Instructor: Landis Grenville

Section 003
MW 500-615 (Maury 110)
Instructor: Michael Dhyne

Section 004
MW 500-615 (Bryan 310)
Instructor: Sara Brickman

Section 005
MWF 1000-1050 (Bryan 330)
Instructor: Quinn Gilman-Forlini

ENCW 2530 - Introduction to Poetry Writing - Themed

Section 001 - "A Field Guide to Landscapes"
TR 500-615 (Bryan 233)
Instructor: Courtney Flerlage

This course will teach fundamentals of poetry writing with a focus on observing landscapes of the natural world. How does the environment-its orders and disorders-help us reflect on our own experience? Can poetry teach us to be better observers of the world around us? Through workshop of student work, craft discussion, and reading poets of the environment, students will learn to write poems that reflect upon encounters with natural spaces.

Section 002 - "Poetics of the Body: Sports and Illness"
MW 500-615 (Bryan 312)
Instructor: Rob Shapiro

An introduction to the craft of poetry writing focused on the body and its portrayal in poems about sports and illness. How do we write the body and effectively portray ecstasy? How can poetry about these topics actively explore the self? How can we connect the body with the deeper emotions of our work? Class involves workshop of student work, craft discussion, and relevant reading of contemporary poets.

ENCW 2560 - Introduction to Fiction Writing - Themed

Section 001 - "Literary Science Fiction"
MWF 200-250 (Bryan 332)
Instructor: James Livingood

This class introduces you to the techniques and craft involved in fiction writing, but with a focus on the subgenre of science fiction. We’ll examine whether the labels “literary” and “science fiction” are mutually exclusive, or if they can overlap. You will produce original creative work, and you will also read a good deal of fiction, ideally becoming a more insightful consumer of stories and other narratives.

Section 002 - "Fiction and the City"
TR 500-615 (Fayerweather 206)
Instructor: Helen Chandler

This course aims to teach creative writing by focusing on urban spaces -- architectures, streetscapes and interiors.  Students will read and produce writing that brings these city spaces to life. We will read and discuss both classic and modern short stories concerned with cities, either in setting or subject matter.  Students will write fiction of their own, and participate in 'workshop' - the practice of critiquing classmates' fiction in a supportive and rigorous way.

Section 003 - "Fiction and the Uses of Technology"
MW 500-615 (Bryan 233)
Instructor: Caitlin Fitzpatrick

An introduction to writing short fiction with a focus on integrating technology into contemporary fiction. We will read and write stories that use laptops, robots, mix-tapes, and other devices to ask incredibly poignant and human questions. How can writers create real relationships in a world that revolves around cyber connections? Are robot boyfriends the future of love? What would happen if your wife left you for a hologram of Kurt Cobain?

ENCW 2600 - Fiction Writing

An introductory course in fiction writing, with a primary focus on creating short stories in a workshop setting. Students will study basic narrative terms and techniques and revise several short stories for a final portfolio. The course will also have extensive outside reading and non-creative writing requirements.  While first- and second-years are the primary audience for ENCW 2600 and should register for the course using SIS, third- and fourth-year students can request to be added manually.

For the add procedure (as well as other creative writing policies) see this page.

Section 002
TR 500-615 (Bryan 310)
Instructor: Jeremy Townley

In this intensive introduction to fiction writing, we'll develop skills to create vivid, surprising, and truthful short fiction. We’ll read about and discuss the elements of narrative craft; study numerous short stories by masters of the form; and develop our short fiction through exercises, workshops, and one-on-one conferences. While first- and second-years are the primary audience for ENCW 2600 and should register for the course using SIS, third- and fourth-year students can request to be added manually. 

For the add procedure (as well as other creative writing policies) see this page.

Section 003
MWF 1200-1250 (New Cabell 066)
Instructor: Ethan Feuer

Section 004
MW 330-445 (Bryan 312)
Instructor: Daniel Hamilton

Section 005
MW 630-745 (Bryan 310)
Instructor: Nichole LeFebvre

Section 006
MWF 1100-1150 (Bryan 330)
Instructor: Adam Roux

Section 007
MWF 900-950 (Bryan 312)
Instructor: Christopher Knapp

ENCW 3310 - Intermediate Poetry Writing I

Section 001
R 200-430 (Dawson's Row 1)
Instructor: Debra Nystrom

A weekly 2.5-hour class for students advanced beyond the level of ENCW 2300. Emphasis is on workshop of students' own poems, with focused writing exercises and written responses to relevant outside reading, as well as class discussions on issues of contemporary poetry.  Final poetry portfolio required. ADMISSION BY PERMISSION OF INSTRUCTOR ONLY.

APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS:  Sample of student work (4-5 poems) to be submitted IN A SINGLE DOCUMENT (either electronically in MS Word, or a hard paper copy), to Professor Nystrom’s email address at dln8u@virginia.edu or to her English Dept faculty mailbox in Bryan Hall; submissions should include a cover sheet with name, year, email address, telephone number, major, prior workshop experience, and other workshops to which you are submitting.    Every effort will be made to notify students of acceptance during the week prior to the beginning of classes, so that students may finalize their schedules in SIS.

Section 002
T 200-430 (Bryan 233)
Instructor: Gregory Orr

A weekly poetry workshop focusing on craft issues and discussions of student poems. We will explore craft issues through careful consideration of exemplary poems. This course presumes, but does not require, previous workshop experience such as Introductory Poetry Writing (ENCW 2300).
Permission of Instructor Required: Interested applicants should send a sample of 4-5 poems and information on writing background as a SINGLE WORD ATTACHMENT to gso@virginia.edu as well as indicating their interest on SIS. DEADLINE: August 7, but SUBMIT NOW because I will fill class as submissions arrive.

ENCW 3350 - Intermediate Nonfiction Writing

Section 001
T 1130-200 (Dawson's Row 1)
Instructor: Sydney Blair

Instructor Permission Required

We will read examples of literary nonfiction by such writers as Tom Wolfe, Virginia Woolf, Henry Allen, Jamaica Kincaid, F. Scott Fitzgerald, David Foster Wallace and Joan Didion, to name a few, as a way of discovering and defining just what “literary nonfiction” is. Students will write short nonfiction pieces throughout the semester, as well as two longer, polished, well- crafted essays. Topics might include the personal essay, memoir, profile piece, travel or food writing, arts writing, for example. This class will be structured along the lines of a creative writing workshop so that prior experience in such classes is useful, but not necessary. A love of reading and writing is essential.

Anyone interested in taking this course should submit an essay/nonfiction piece, or a short story (12 pages max, hard copy preferable but email OK), at least 10 days before classes begin in August. Please attach a note telling me who and what year you are, your e-mail address, what workshops or related classes you’ve taken and with whom, and any other relevant information. I will alert you via SIS a week or so before our first class.

ENCW 3610 - Intermediate Fiction Writing

Section 001
R 500-730 (Dawson's Row 1)
Instructor: Elizabeth Denton

Instructor Permission Required.

Read short fiction.  Write your own.  Students will write two stories and revise one. Creative responses to weekly reading assignments encourage students to focus on the most fundamental building block of the short story:  scene making.   Active classroom participation and love of reading and writing are essential.

To be considered for this class, please send a short story (up to 15 pages) to me at ed3m@virginia.edu by August 1st.  Attach a note telling me who and what year you are, your email address, what workshops you’ve taken and with whom, and whether you’re applying to other workshops. I will alert you through SIS ten days or so before classes begin.  INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION means you must submit work to be considered—see above.

Section 002
W 1130-200 (Dawson's Row 1)
Instructor: Jeffery Allen

Instructor Permission Required.

Read short fiction.  Write your own.  Students will write two stories and revise one. Creative responses to weekly reading assignments encourage students to focus on the most fundamental aspect of the short story:  scene making.   Active classroom participation and love of reading and writing are essential.

To be considered for this class, please send a short story (up to 15 pages), no later than one week before classes begin, to me at jra8w@virginia.edu.  Attach a note telling me who and what year you are, your email address, what workshops you’ve taken and with whom, and whether you’re applying to other workshops. I will alert you through SIS a week or so before classes begin.

Section 003
M 1130-200 (Bryan 233)
Instructor: Sydney Blair

Instructor Permission Required.

Sharp focus on the reading and writing of short fiction. Students will write two stories and revise one. Written responses to weekly assignments, occasional in-class writing exercises. Active classroom participation, and love of reading and writing essential. In order to be considered for this class, you must submit a manuscript, preferably to my mailbox in 229 Bryan (up to 15 pp. is fine) at least 10 days before classes begin in August. If you are out of town, you may e-mail me. Please attach a note saying who and what year you are, your e-mail address, what workshops you’ve taken and with whom, other fiction workshops you’re considering, and any other relevant information. I will alert you vis SIS a week or so before classes begin.

ENCW 4810 - Advanced Fiction Writing I

Section 001
W 500-730 (Dawson's Row 1)
Instructor: Elizabeth Denton

Instructor Permission Required.

An advanced class for ambitious students who want to extend their exploration of crafting literary fiction. We’ll examine how writers have worked within the long story's more leisurely scope—contracting and expanding time, structuring and restructuring (architecture and shape), shifting among points of view, creating spaces, controlling tensions, crystalizing characters—with the aim that what you read could inspire your own longer stories. The class will revolve around your writing and published texts that may include works by Alice Munro, Lorrie Moore, Edward P. Jones, Zadie Smith, Wells Tower, Gina Berriault, George Saunders, Adam Johnson, Deborah Eisenberg, Lauren Groff, Raymond Carver, and others.  By the end of the term, you will have drafted and revised a 35 (or so) page story. 

To be considered for this class, please send a short story (up to 15 pages) to me at ed3m@virginia.edu by August 1st. Attach a note telling me who and what year you are, your email address, what workshops you’ve taken and with whom, and whether you’re applying to other workshops. I will alert you through SIS ten days or so before classes begin.  INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION means you must submit work to be considered—see above.  

ENCW 4830 - Advanced Poetry Writing I

Section 001
W 200-430 (Bryan 233)
Instructor: Debra Nystrom

A weekly 2.5-hour writing workshop for advanced poetry writers, focused on student poems and assigned reading for craft discussion.  Along with a semester portfolio of poems, students will write short prose pieces on poetry and will offer one in-class presentation. ADMISSION BY PERMISSION OF INSTRUCTOR ONLY.

APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS:  Sample of student work (4-5 poems) to be submitted IN A SINGLE DOCUMENT (either electronically in MS Word, or a hard paper copy), to Professor Nystrom’s email address at dln8u@virginia.edu or to her English Dept faculty mailbox in Bryan Hall; submissions should include a cover sheet with name, year, email address, telephone number, major, prior workshop experience, and other workshops to which you are submitting.    Every effort will be made to notify students of acceptance during the week prior to the beginning of classes, so that students may finalize their schedules in SIS.

ENCW 5310 - Advanced Poetry Writing II

Section 001
M 1130-200 (Bryan 312)
Instructor: Lisa Spaar

Instructor Permission Required, contact Lisa Spaar at lrs9e@virginia.edu

The overarching thematic preoccupation of this advanced poetry writing workshop, open to undergraduates and graduate students by permission of instructor, will be the poetics of childhood—childhood which Malcolm Cowley called the “landscape by which all others are reckoned and condemned.”  Easily misunderstood, revised, denied, and romanticized, childhood, American, literary, personal, iconic, fabular, haunts us with its whiff of pre-Lapsarian wonder, its primal urgencies, its partially understood experiences that must, of necessity, compel and taunt us with mythological, frightening, ecstatic, or nostalgic intensity.   Little wonder that many adult poets, exiled from their own beginnings, have been obsessed with returning to this territory, in which the nascent self attempts to make sense of and articulate the world that in turn fiercely shapes (or effaces or interrogates) the self.  In this course, we will focus our making of poems in a widely interpreted arena of what constitutes childhood – ours, others – poetically, conceptually, richly.  Rainer Maria Rilke has asserted that childhood is one of poetry’s two inexhaustible sources (the other being dreams).   Baudelaire wrote, “Genius is nothing more nor less than childhood recovered at will.”  Through a range of exercises, assignments, and examples, we will focus on notions of childhood in order to explore the ways in which children’s relationships to the world – to objects, to language, to experience – are like the poet’s:  mythic, metaphorical, fragmented, primal.

Poetry Writing Program

ENPW 4820 - Poetry Program Poetics

Section 001 - The Poetics of Ecstasy
T 200-430 (Dawson's Row 1)
Instructor: Lisa Spaar

Instructor Permission Required, contact Lisa Spaar at lrs9e@virginia.edu

The Greek word ekstasis signifies displacement, trance—literally, “standing elsewhere.” In this seminar class, designed for students in the Area Program in Poetry Writing, but open to others with permission of the instructor, we will explore the poetics of fervor—erotic, visionary, psychosomatic, negative, religious, mystical.  When the precincts of poetry and rapture intersect, what transpires? What is possible? What is at stake and why does it matter? We will read widely and deeply across cultures and time, including work by Dickinson, Whitman, Carson, Hopkins, Sappho, Keats, Rilke, Mirabai, Rumi, Ginsberg, Rimbaud, and other ancient, modern, and contemporary writers who have explored the experience of being beside one’s self in the transport of ecstasy.  Key critical texts include readings from Anne Carson’s Eros the Bittersweet, Michel de Certeau’s The Mystic Fable, Georges Bataille’s Erotism:  Death and Sensuality, and Roland Barthes’s A Lover’s Discourse.  The final project will be a series of six original “ecstatic” poems (or one long ecstatic poem), with prose introduction, an “assay/essay,” in which the student explores and articulates his or her evolving understanding of the poetics of ecstasy.

ENPW 4920 - Poetry Capstone

Section 001
R 200-430 (Bryan 233)
Instructor: Paul Guest

Instructor Permission Required, contact Paul Guest at pmg4w@virginia.edu

Directed poetry writing project for students in the English Department's Undergraduate Area Program in Poetry Writing, leading to completion of a manuscript of poems. Both Capstone courses are required for students in the Distinguished Majors Program.

Literary Prose

ENLP 4550 - Topics in Literary Prose

Section 001 - Narrative Theory in Practice
W 1130-200 (Bryan 233)
Instructor: Christopher Tilghman

In this course we will investigate how fiction works with a series of creative weekly exercises designed to help students understand and master the insights that came out of – and to some degree continue to come out of - structuralist narrative theory.  The course is designed for any student, fiction writer or literature major, who wants to gain a firmer grounding of the fundamental techniques of literary prose.   Among the weekly topics will be narrative distance, levels of dialogue, levels of consciousness, focalization, embedded narration, and temporal order and frequency, narrator and narratee, and others.

Medieval Literature

ENMD 3130 - Old Icelandic Literature in Translation

Section 001
TR 200-315 (Bryan 235)
Instructor: John Casteen

A survey of major works written in Iceland from around 1100 to the end of the Middle Ages. The texts include several family and regional sagas, short narratives related to certain of these, to historiography of the settlement period, and to Iceland's conversion to Christianity, and a few selections from the Poetic Edda and the Edda of Snorri Sturluson.  All readings are in translation.

ENMD 3260 - Chaucer II

Section 001 - Chaucer: Dream Poems, Language Games, & Virtual Reality
TR 930-1045 (Bryan 235)
Instructor: Elizabeth Fowler

Together, we’ll read Geoffrey Chaucer’s four dream poems and investigate how the virtual reality we call art can produce intense and immersive human experience.  The Book of the Duchess, The House of Fame, The Parliament of Fowls, and The Legend of Good Women are surreal, sweet, funny, philosophical, emotionally intense, and visually overstimulated poems which are even more interesting in our age of complex media tech; dreams and poetry seem to provide Chaucer with a way of thinking explicitly about what it is to have para-sensory, virtual experience. We'll be interested in how specific configurations of language (image, metaphor, tense, and so on) work to produce cognitive, emotional, and sensory effects. This is a “close reading” course that will sharpen your reading skills as well as provide an encounter with one of the most influential and beloved poets in world history. (We will also undoubtedly talk about Chaucer's other ambitions in these works — philosophical, political, theological, aesthetic, imagistic.) Two short papers or projects, two in-class exams, perhaps a few quizzes. It’s fine to take this if you’ve already had ENMD 3250 or other courses in Middle English, but no skill in Middle English is necessary to join us. It's a good course for beginners and Chaucer adepts alike.  Programmers, writers, and visual artists welcome!

Renaissance Literature

ENRN 3110 - Literature of the Renaissance

Section 001 - The New Philosophy and English Renaissance Literature
TR 1230-145 (Bryan 328)
Instructor: Dan Kinney

In this course we'll examine the strange mix of radicalism and caution that typifies Renaissance culture not only in England, looking at how daring Renaissance authors from More and Erasmus to Shakespeare and Donne reconceive the self, reinvent the tradition, and recast the polis. One short, one longer paper, regular class participation, and a final exam.

ENRN 3210 - Shakespeare I

Lecture:
MW 200-250 (Minor 125)
Instructor: Katharine Maus

This course deals with the first half of Shakespeare's career as a playwright, in which he was mainly writing histories and comedies. ENRN 3220, in the Spring, deals with the second half of Shakespeare's career, in which he was mainly writing tragedies and romances.  You may take either or both courses; neither is a prerequisite for the other.

2 50-minute lectures and 1 50-minute discussion section per week.

Requirements: 3 five-page papers, a final exam emphasizing material covered in lectures and section meetings, and regular short assignments made by section leaders.

This course does not automatically fulfill the Second Writing Requirement, but it may be tweaked to do so.  See me in the first few weeks of the semester if you are interested in this option.

Discussion Sections:

Section 101
R 330-420 (New Cabell 332)
Instructor: Samuel Lemley

Section 102
F 1000-1050 (Bryan 328)
Instructor: TBA

Section 103
R 500-550 (Bryan 328)
Instructor: TBA

Section 104
W 500-550 (New Cabell 209)
Instructor: TBA

Section 105
R 500-550 (Bryan 235)
Instructor: Samuel Lemley

Section 106
F 900-950 (Bryan 328)
Instructor: TBA

ENRN 4500 - Advanced Studies in Renaissance Literature

Section 001 - Renaissance Drama
MW 200-315 (Bryan 312)
Instructor: John Parker

To examine some of Shakespeare's greatest contemporaries and rivals, in particular Christopher Marlowe and Ben Jonson, with special attention to the London theater's sub-genres: revenge tragedy, city comedy and tragi-comedy.  Other authors may include Thomas Kyd, Francis Beaumont, John Fletcher, George Chapman, Thomas Middleton, John Webster, John Ford and Philip Massinger.  We will try to get a sense of what it means to speak of a "Renaissance" at this moment in English history; how the playtexts were printed and subsequently edited; and how the documents we read relate to early modern stage productions we can only reimagine on this textual basis.

ENRN 4530 - Seminar in Medieval and Renaissance Studies

Section 001 - Transforming Desire: Medieval and Renaissance Erotic Poetics
TR 200-315 (Bryan 312)
Instructor: Clare Kinney

This seminar will focus upon lyric, narrative and dramatic works from the medieval and Renaissance periods which explore both the polymorphous perversities and the nobler trajectories of earthly (and occasionally not so earthly) love. We'll be examining the ways in which desire is represented as transforming the identity and consciousness of the lover; we will also be examining (and attempting to historicize) strategies employed by our authors to variously transform, redefine, enlarge and contain the erotic impulse. We'll start with some selections from the Metamorphoses of Ovid (read in translation); we will finish with some astonishing seventeenth-century love poems to God. Along the way we’ll be looking at the gendering of erotic representation and erotic speech, the intermittent entanglement of secular and sacred love, the role of genre in refiguring eros, some intersections between the discourses of sexuality and the discourses of power.

Tentative reading list: selections from Ovid's Metamorphoses, the Lais (short romances) of Marie de France, Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde, sonnets by Petrarch, Philip Sidney, Lady Mary Wroth and John Donne, Shakespeare's As You Like It and The Winter’s Tale. (All non-English works will be read in translation.) 

Requirements: regular attendance, lively participation in discussion, a series of e-mail responses to our readings, a short paper (7 pages); a long term paper (14+ pages).

Restoration and Eighteenth Century Literature

ENEC 3130 - English Literature of the Restoration and Eighteenth Century

Section 001
TR 1230-145 (Bryan 235)
Instructor: John O'Brien

In this course, we will read works written between around 1650 and 1800 from the entire Anglophone world, the British Isles, the north American colonies (which until 1783 were a part of Great Britain), and even (a little bit) from the Caribbean islands that were central to the British empire. We will read works by (among many others) Aphra Behn, John Locke, Daniel Defoe, Jonathan Swift, Anne Finch, Anne Bradstreet, Benjamin Franklin, Samuel Johnson, and Thomas Jefferson.

Fulfills the English major requirement for a course in literature between 1700 and 1900.

ENEC 3200 - Eighteenth-Century Women Writers

Section 001
TR 930-1045 (Bryan 328)
Instructor: Alison Hurley

During the eighteenth century, social, economic, and technological developments converged to alter the ways in which texts were produced and consumed.  The result of these innovations was a new “print culture” that offered women the opportunity to step onto the public stage as professional authors for the first time.   Female authors, nevertheless, remained intensely aware of their “delicate situation” within the literary public sphere.  They responded to this situation by deploying a variety of authorial strategies that ingeniously combined self-promotion with self-protection in order to legitimize their appearance in print.  This class will be particularly interested in examining the relationship between gender and genre during the eighteenth century.  Our readings will highlight a series of specific literary forms – conduct literature, drama, poetry, the novel – each of which implicates gender in distinctive and compelling ways.  Our authors will include, but not be limited to, Aphra Behn, Eliza Haywood, Frances Burney, Jane Austen and Mary Wollstonecraft.

Class requirements will include weekly reading-responses, frequent reading quizzes, two essays, and a final exam.  Our class meetings will be largely discussion based.

ENEC 3400 - Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Drama

Section 001
TR 330-445 (Bryan 235)
Instructor: John O'Brien

Eighteenth-century Britons never got tired of saying that the stage and the world are mirrors for each other, that all the world’s a stage. In this course, we will read dramas written and performed from 1660 to 1780, and also attend to the ways in which the theater reflected, but also refracted, condensed, contained and otherwise mediated problems and questions that occupied the culture at large. The plays that we will read include (among others) William Wycherley’s The Country Wife, John Dryden’s All for Love, Aphra Behn’s The Rover, Thomas Otway’s Venice Preserv’d, William Congreve’s The Way of the World, Susanna Centlivre’s A Bold Stroke for a Wife, George Lillo’s The London Merchant, and Richard Brinsley Sheridan’s The School for Scandal.   Requirements:  participation (including participation in a group performance of a scene from one the plays we’ll be reading), two papers (one short, one longer), midterm and final exams, and participation in a digital editing project, where the class will collectively produce a digital edition of Aphra Behn’s The Rover. 

This course fulfills the English major requirement for a course in literature between 1700 and 1900.

ENEC 4500 - Advanced Studies in Eighteenth-Century Literature I

Section 001 - At Home and Abroad in the Eighteenth Century
MW 200-315 (Dawson's Row 1)
Instructor: Cynthia Wall

To what extent are we defined and shaped by the spaces we inhabit? What means this door, this window, this staircase?  The eighteenth century witnessed the professionalization of architecture, the popularity of house and garden design books, and a profusion of novels, poems, and plays that push houses – great and small – front and center. At the same time, improvements in roads and coaches, expanded trade routes, the explorations of science, and the thrust of empire meant that more and more people of all classes could travel more easily at home and abroad, visiting other houses, other cities, other cultures, and writing about them.  In this seminar we will learn to visualize with historical clarity the cottages, farmhouses, inns, and country seats, as well as the roads, cities, and seas, of eighteenth-century domesticity and exploration. We will read poems, plays, novels, travel narratives, country house guides, garden theory, and ship’s logs, by Jane Austen, James Boswell, Frances Burney, Captain James Cook, Oliver Goldsmith, Samuel Johnson, Alexander Pope, Caroline Lybbe Powys, Humphry Repton, and Gilbert White. Requirements: weekly analytical commentaries, a presentation, a short close-reading paper, a longer research paper, and, of course, profound discussion.

Nineteenth Century British Literature

ENNC 3110 - English Poetry and Prose of the Nineteenth Century I

Section 001 - Romanticism and Some of its Legacies
TR 1100-1215 (Bryan 328)
Instructor: Jerome McGann

The course starts with a close look at William Blake’s The Marriage of Heaven and Hell. It then moves to a series of “study units”:  “The Gothic”; the Romantic Poem of Meditation; Romantic Nature; Byronism.  Each unit will look at a series of works, both poetry and prose, selected from British, European, and American literature of the 19th century.

ENNC 3240 - Victorian Poetry

Section 001
MW 200-315 (Bryan 328)
Instructor: Andrew Stauffer

A survey of British poetry from the 1830s to the early 1900s, with attention to the work of Hemans, the Brownings, Tennyson, the Rossettis, Swinburne, Webster, Hopkins, Arnold, Housman, and Hardy. Two papers, a mid-term, and final exam.

ENNC 4500 - Advanced Studies in Nineteenth Century Literature I

Section 002 - Literature and Science in the Nineteenth Century
MW 330-445 (New Cabell 187)
Instructor: Paul Cantor

This course will study the impact of science on nineteenth-century literature and in particular the development of science fiction as a genre, with emphasis on the epoch-making works of H. G. Wells. We will examine the ways in which science posed a challenge to literature and called into question the very notion of artistic truth. But we will also consider the ways in which science served as a new form of inspiration for fiction writers, beginning with Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. One of the main subjects of the course will be Darwin and Darwinism, and we will read his Origin of Species complete. We will discuss the relation of science to the Victorian crisis of faith and also explore the interrelation of science and the British Empire. Other writers studied will include Browning, Tennyson, and Robert Louis Stevenson. One class presentation, one long paper, and class participation.

Section 003 - Jane Austen
TR 200-315 (New Cabell 291)
Instructor: Susan Fraiman

An intensive study of the work of Jane Austen.  Take this course if you’re new to Austen or already a fan.  Take it for Austen’s epigrammatic sentences and love stories, but also for her biting social commentary and (beneath the light, bright surface) her probing of the darker emotions.  How do the novels treat such topics as family conflict, first impressions, sexual jealousy, women’s property rights, New World slavery, and the Napoleonic Wars?  Why have Austen’s happy endings been accused of haste?  In addition to exploring Austen’s formal strategies, thematic concerns, and engagement with the issues of her time, we will touch on her reception in subsequent eras, including a cinematic interpretation or two.  Two papers and a final exam.

Modern and Contemporary Literature

ENMC 3500 - Studies in Modern and Contemporary Literature

Section 001 - The Vietnam War in Literature and Film (changing to ENMC 3630)
MW 200-315 (New Cabell 168)
Instructor: Sylvia Chong

It has been over 40  years since the Fall of Saigon in 1975, marking the end of a war that claimed the lives of an estimated 58,260 American troops and over 4 million Southeast Asians across Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia. In the U.S. today, “Vietnam” signifies not a country but a lasting syndrome that haunts American politics and society, from debates about foreign policy to popular culture. But what of the millions of Southeast Asian refugees the War created? What, in this moment of commemoration and reflection, are the lasting legacies of the Vietnam War / American War for Southeast Asian diasporic communities? We will examine literature and film (fictional and documentary) made by and about Americans and Southeast Asians (Vietnamese, Cambodians, Laotians, and Hmong) affected by the Vietnam War, spanning the entirety of this 40 year period. Texts may include Francis Ford Coppola, Apocalypse Now; Tim O'Brien, The Things They Carried; Peter Davis, Hearts and Minds; Yusek Komunyakaa, Dien Cia Dau; Tiana Alexander, From Hollywood to Hanoi; Viet Thanh Nguyen, The Sympathizer; Duong Thu Huong, Paradise of the Blind; Clint Eastwood, Gran Torino; Socheata Poeuv, New Years Baby.

Section 002 - Modern Poetry
TR 200-315 (New Cabell 332)
Instructor: Mark Edmundson

The early and middle twentieth century gave birth to some wonderful poetry in England and America.  We will read and discuss some of the best of it.  We’ll begin with W.B Yeats and from his rather astonishing work, the work of “the last Romantic,” we’ll move on. Possible authors: Robert Frost, H.D., T.S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, William Carlos Williams, W.H. Auden, Marianne Moore, Langston Hughes, Elizabeth Bishop. Short papers and quizzes, a longer essay at the close.

Section 003 - Contemporary Jewish Fiction
TR 200-315 (Bryan 328)
Instructor: Caroline Rody

Novels and short stories that reflect on Jewishness and modernity, history, memory, social and familial change, uses of the creative imagination, and the competing longings, loyalties, identities, affiliations, and possibilities current in the contemporary world. Authors may include Isaac Bashevis Singer, Grace Paley, Elie Wiesel, Alfred Kazin, Art Spiegelman, Lore Segal, Bruno Schulz, Cynthia Ozick, David Grossman, Jonathan Safran Foer, Philip Roth, Nicole Krauss, Michael Chabon.

Requirements will include several one-page responses to the reading, a short and a long paper, group leading of class discussion, and a final exam.

Section 004 - Musical Fictions (Combined Section with AAS 3500-001)
TR 1100-1215 (New Cabell 485)
Instructor: Njelle Hamilton

In this interdisciplinary course we will explore the genre of the contemporary musical novel as we read seminal blues, jazz, reggae, mambo, calypso and rock novels from writers such as James Baldwin, Ishmael Reed, Michael Thelwell, Oscar Hijuelos, Esi Edugyan, and Nick Hornby.  We will explore issues such as: How and why do contemporary writers record the sounds (instruments, rhythm, melody, tone), lyrics, structure, and personal and cultural valences of music, not on wax, but in novelistic prose, and what does it mean to simultaneously read and ‘listen to’ such novels? What kinds of cultural baggage and aesthetic conventions do particular music forms bring to the novel form? Why are writers and readers both so intrigued by the figure of the musician as a literary trope? Assignments include: listening and reading journals, oral presentations,  musical and literary reviews, and a final paper.

ENMC 4500 - Advanced Studies in Modern and Contemporary Literature

Section 001 - Modern Painters and Writers
TR 1230-145 (Bryan 330)
Instructor: Jessica Feldman

How do modern writers and painters interact?   Baudelaire, Delacroix, Manet, Mallarmé, Cézanne, Flaubert, Rimbaud, Apollinaire, Stein, and Picasso:  we’ll look at relations among them, both in their daily lives and across the paintings and literary texts they created.  When the poet and art critic Charles Baudelaire created a poetic manifesto of Modernism entitled The Painter of Modern Life, he imagined a kind of art, a mode of criticism, and an ideal artist which to this day illuminate efforts to make and appreciate literature and art. Taking this document and the questions it raises as our inspiration, we’ll consider a wealth of beautiful, fascinating, and disturbing works. This course does not require prior knowledge of either French literature or art history, although both will be welcomed and cultivated.

Section 003 - The Global City: New York, Los Angeles, London and more
TR 930-1045 (Bryan 334)
Instructor: Sandhya Shukla

This course explores the representation and social life of the global city.  We look at cities that have been made by flows -- of people, capital and ideas -- and that function more as global, rather than national, or regional spaces.  And we explore how key historical experiences, of war, colonialism, capitalism, and migration have shaped what we think of as modern (and postmodern) metropoles. We consider cultural exchange as a major theme of novels and films, and also interrogate class, racial and ethnic stratification that challenges any simple notion of community.  With a rigorous interdisciplinary approach, we ask questions about form, of both the texts and the cities themselves. Though we will center our semester’s discussions on three major global cities, New York, Los Angeles and London, we will also broaden our inquiry at times to consider other actual and imagined urban formations.  And to deepen our understanding of the global city, we will interrogate the constitutive terms through an engagement with critical theory on space, difference and encounter.  With so many different themes and sub-themes, ranging widely across regions and nations, our work this term of course only scratches the surface of the topic of the global city; and students will research and write final papers that take up any of a variety of approaches, and materials.  Readings may include works by authors such as: Teju Cole, William Gibson, Cynthia Kadohata, Chang-rae Lee, China Mieville, Geoff Nicholson, Joseph O’Neill, Salman Rushdie, Zadie Smith, Karen Tei Yamashita, Saskia Sassen, Marshall Berman, Michael Keith, and Michel de Certeau.

Section 004 - The Current American Novel
TR 330-445 (Minor 130)
Instructor: Christopher Tilghman

This course focuses on novels primarily by North American writers and published in the U.S. in the past five years.  We will read and discuss one novel a week.  The objective is to identify, as much as possible or reasonable, strong individual voices and the broad themes and trends in the work that is being published, reviewed, and read today. We'll investigate the kinds of political and social commentary that continue to thrive alongside the domestic and personal. We'll look at a range of aesthetics, and attempt to discern the influence of modernist and postmodernist thinking on mainstream contemporary realism. We'll try to gain some insight into book publishing as a cultural enterprise. Weekly written assignments will include short creative responses to the works, which will be used each week to frame a collaborative investigation into the contemporary literary scene.

ENMC 4530 - Seminar in Modern Literature and Culture

Section 001 - The Dystopian Novel
TR 1230-145 (Bryan 332)
Instructor: Mrinalini Chakravorty

“We live in difficult times, in times of monstrous chimeras and evil dreams and criminal follies,” Joseph Conrad wrote at the beginning of the 20th C.  This course will explore the emergence of dystopia as a genre for the modern novel.  If utopias are concerned with conjuring the perfect society—a ‘good place’ that is yet ‘no place’—dystopias imagine the opposite.  Celebrated dystopian novels such as Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World, George Orwell’s 1984, Margaret Atwood’s The Handsmaid’s Tale, Yevgeny Zamiantin’s We and more recent others distill the terrors of modern life onto a terribly estranged future.  Dystopias, in other words, offer apocalyptic visions; they summon an aesthetic of speculation, pessimism, horror, and dysfunction to caution against modern developments that are generally seen as benevolent. 

It is notable that dystopia often takes the form of political and science fiction.  In our study, we will seek to understand why that is the case.  What elements cohere the genre of dystopian fiction?  What dimensions are borrowed from other forms?  What invented anew?  And finally, what is peculiar to dystopia as a genre all its own?   It is commonly thought that a singular feature of dystopian fiction is that it interrogates the rise of various state forms, both totalitarian and democratic, in the post-industrial age.  What happens, dystopian works ask, if we distort modernity’s most exalted achievements to an extreme?  Do conditions of modern living such as of surveillance, conformity, comfort, milatarism, immunity, mechanization, mobilty, reproductive facility, incarceration, medicalization, and scientificity lead to better futures?  The bleak worlds that dystopias imagine starkly suggest that they do not.  Instead, dystopian novels ask that readers contemplate, and even critique, the ethical cost of our acceptance of modern social conditions.  They demand that we query the depletion of freedom, autonomy, and humanity in modern times.  It is this non-mimetic, socially responsive dimension of dystopian novels that this course will ultimately probe.

The seminar will survey major works of dystopian fiction from the late-19thC onward.  Alongside such classics as Wells’ The Time Machine, Huxley’s Brave New World, Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four, Atwood’s A Handmaid’s Tale, and Delaney’s Babel-17, we will also read work by Octavia Butler, Ursula Le Guin, Kazuo Ishiguro, Amitav Ghosh, Cormac McCarthy, Haruki Murakami, Indra Sinha, Han Kang, Peter Carey and others.   The syllabus will include brief philosophical and critical readings on utopia (Thomas More), science (Francis Bacon), satire (Jonathan Swift; John Dryden), feminism, race, capitalism, and modernity.  We will also view a few films (Blade Runner; Babadook) and analyze some graphic novelas (Adriane Tomine; Joe Sacco; Keiji Nakazawa). 

A Modern Literature and Culture seminar, this course is open to all others who are interested.  Course requirements include two short papers and a longer research project.

American Literature

ENAM 3500 - Studies in American Literature

Section 002 - The Civil Rights Movement
TR 330-445 (Monroe 118)
Instructor: Deborah McDowell

Section 300 - American Fictions
Lecture: MW 1000-1050 (Bryan 235)
Discussions: R 330-420 (New Cabell 364) OR R 430-520 (New Cabell 364)
Instructor: Stephen Railton

We'll read selected novels from at least three different generations of American novelists.  We'll talk about each novel on its own terms, and as part of a generation in American history, and as part of the larger story of American culture.  Writers will include: Mark Twain, Henry James, Kate Chopin, Charles Chesnutt, Stephen Crane, Theodore Dreiser, Willa Cather, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway and William Faulkner.

ENAM 3510 - Studies in African-American Literature and Culture

Section 001 - James Baldwin
TR 200-315 (Ruffner 177)
Instructor: Maurice Wallace

ENAM 4500 - Advanced Studies in American Literature

Section 001 - The American Renaissance (Combined with AMST 4500-001)
TR 930-1045 (Room TBA)
Instructor: Jennifer Greeson

This seminar surveys the audacious experiments in prose and poetry produced by authors in the United States in the decades before the American Civil War.  We will read the fiction of Poe, Hawthorne, Stowe, and Melville; the poetry of Whitman and Dickinson; the essays and orations of Emerson, Thoreau, Douglass, and Lincoln.  This is the period in which American literature became internationally recognized as an autonomous national tradition.  It is also the time when industrialization, the slavery question, sectionalism, and westward expansion tore the country apart.  We will attend to the intertwining of political crisis and artistic innovation that marks the American Renaissance as one of the great epochs in the history of literature written in English.

Satisfies the 1700-1900 historical distribution requirement for the major.

Section 002 - Mark Twain
MW 200-315 (Bryan 310)
Instructor: Stephen Railton

For over 150 years Mark Twain has been a great subject to talk about. Because this is a seminar, we'll create the conversation together.  But I will bring to the class my own long-standing but unresolved preoccupations with what Samuel Clemens' achievements as "Mark Twain" can reveal, about our society and ourselves.  Chief among these are: the project of defining American culture and American literature, and the drama of performing a self.

Section 003 - W. E. B. Du Bois (Cross-listed with AMST 4500)
TR 1100-1215 (Bryan 332)
Instructor: Marlon Ross

This course examines the work, career, and life of leading American and international intellectual  W.E.B. Du Bois by placing him historically in relation to the movements he led, the figures he allied himself with and fought against, and the transformations in thought, social activism, and literature he helped to bring about.  Because Du Bois’s intellectual and activist contributions range across history, sociology, education, fiction, philosophy, political theory, literary theory, biography, and autobiography, we’ll sample works by him in each of these fields. In addition to examining his major texts — including The Souls of Black Folk (philosophy), The Philadelphia Negro (sociology), Black Reconstruction in America (history), John Brown (biography), Dark Princess (novel), Dusk of Dawn (autobiography), The World and Africa (African studies)  — we’ll sample his influential essays from the journal he edited, The Crisis.  Du Bois’s impact will be further understood by examining the work of those he argued with, including Booker T. Washington, Ida B. Wells Barnett, Marcus Garvey, Langston Hughes, and A. Phillip Randolph. We’ll contextualize influential theories like the color-line, double consciousness, the Talented Tenth, art as propaganda, liberal education as uplift, Pan-Africanism, etc. in light of the movements he championed, including the Niagara Movement, the NAACP, the Pan-African Congresses, the anti-lynching campaign, the Harlem Renaissance, anti-World War II activism, the United Nations movement, anti-colonialism, and democratic socialism. How did a man whose fierce idealism over decades end in a decision to renounce his U.S. citizenship and retreat to Ghana in the final years of his life?

ENAM 5840 - Contemporary African-American Literature

Section 001
TR 930-1045 (Cocke 101)
Instructor: Lisa Woolfork

This seminar uses the concept of time as a foundation for exploring selected works of contemporary African American Literature. Time is a useful representational concept in so far as it allows for a wide-ranging assessment of literary and cultural tropes. Time is a noun and a verb; it is the basis for history. It can be on our side or we can lack what seems sufficient.  It can heal all wounds or it can be a wound itself. These are the types of questions that will be used as a beginning for larger and evolving conversations about the works listed below. The course is also committed to helping students develop their own research agenda through formation of a culminating seminar paper and cultivate pedagogic techniques using the discussion-leading portion.

Genre Studies

 

English Language Studies

 

Criticism

ENCR 3400 - Theories of Reading

Section 001
MW 330-445 (Bryan 235)
Instructor: Rita Felski

How and why do we read? And what is the relationship between academic reading and the kind of reading we do for pleasure? This course is divided into two parts. The first part, on critical reading, surveys influential forms of literary theory, including structuralism, Marxism, psychoanalysis, deconstruction, feminism, postcolonialism, and queer theory.  In the second half, we will explore everyday experiences of reading that are either ignored or treated with suspicion in literary theory:  identification and recognition; empathy; enchantment and self-loss; horror and shock; fandom and the pleasure of collective reading. The goal of the course is to explore the similarities and differences between reading inside and outside the classroom and to examine the emotional as well as intellectual dimensions of interpretation.

ENCR 4500 - Advanced Studies in Literary Criticism

Section 001 - Race, Space, and Culture (Cross-listed with AMST 4500)
T 630-900 (Bryan 312)
Instructor: Kenrick Grandison and Marlon Ross

Co-taught by K. Ian Grandison and Marlon Ross, this interdisciplinary seminar examines the spatial implications at work in the theories, practices, and experiences of race, as well as the cultural implications at stake in our apprehensions and conceptions of space.  Themes include: 1) the human/nature threshold; 2) public domains/private lives; 3) urban renewal, historic preservation, and the new urbanism; 4) defensible design and the spatial politics of fear; and 5) the cultural ideologies of sustainability.  The seminar foregrounds the multidimensionality of space as a physical, perceptual, social, ideological, and discursive phenomenon.  This means melding concepts and practices used in the design professions with theories affiliated with race, postcolonial, literary, and cultural studies.  We’ll investigate a variety of spaces, actual and discursive, through selected theoretical readings from diverse disciplines (e.g., William Cronon, Patricia Williams, Philip Deloria, Leslie Kanes Weisman, Gloria Anzaldua, Oscar Newman); through case studies (e.g., Indian reservations, burial grounds, suburban homes, gay bars, national monuments); and through local site visits.  Requirements include a midterm and final exam, one site visit response paper, and a major team research project and presentation.

ENCR 5650 - Books as Physical Objects

Section 001
MW 1100-1215 (Bryan 310)
Instructor: David Vander Meulen

We know the past chiefly through artifacts that survive, and books are among the most common of these objects. Besides conveying a text, each book also contains evidence of the circumstances of its manufacture, how its producers viewed it, and how its readers might have received it.  In considering what questions to ask of these mute objects, this course might be considered the "archaeology of printing"—that is, the identification, description, and interpretation of printed artifacts surviving from the past five centuries, as well as exploration of the critical theory that lies behind such an approach to texts. With attention to production processes, including the operation of the hand press, it will investigate ways of analyzing elements such as paper, typography, illustrations, binding, and organization of the constituent sections of a book.  The course will explore how a text is inevitably affected by the material conditions of its production and how an understanding of the physical processes by which it was formed can aid historical research in a variety of disciplines, not only those that treat verbal texts but also those that deal with printed music and works of visual art.  The class will draw extensively on the holdings of the University Library's Special Collections Department, as well as on its Hinman Collator (an early version of the one at the CIA).  Open to graduate students and advanced undergraduates.

Special Topics in Literature

ENSP 2610 - Point of View Journalism

Section 001 (Combined with AMST 2422-001)
TR 500-615 (Maury 110)
Instructor: Lisa Goff

ENSP 3559 - New Course in Special Topics in Literature

Section 001 - "Deafness in Literature and Film" (Combined section with ASL 3559-001)
MWF 1200-1250 (New Cabell 315)
Instructor: Christopher Krentz

What does deafness signify, especially in a western civilization centered upon speech? In this course we will study some of the contradictory ways that deaf people have been depicted over the last three centuries. Our approach will be contrapuntal; canonical texts or mainstream films will be juxtaposed with relatively unknown works by deaf artists. We will read fiction, short and long, by authors such as Defoe, Haywood, Dickens, Turgenev, Melville, Maupassant, Twain, Bierce, McCullers, Welty, O'Connor, and Thon, along with prose by such deaf writers as Laurent Clerc, Adele Jewel, Bernard Bragg, and Sotonwa Opeoluwa. We will also view films like Johnny Belinda, Immortal Beloved, and Beyond Silence and movies by deaf filmmakers like Charles Krauel. Finally, we will briefly consider selected poetry, drama, and storytelling in American Sign Language (in translation) by deaf performers.

No prerequisite.  Requirements will include active and informed participation, two papers, a midterm, and a final exam.

ENSP 4500 - Advanced Studies in Special Topics in Literature

Section 001 - Childhood
TR 1100-1215 (Bryan 330)
Instructor: Mark Edmundson

We’ll begin with the Romantic discovery (or was it an invention?) of childhood by way of Rousseau and Wordsworth and Blake. Then on to the great debunker of childhood innocence: Sigmund Freud.  After that we’ll consider different versions of childhood by way of Mark Twain, Malcolm X, Simone de Beauvoir and others.  Students will finish the course by writing a memoir about their own childhoods that makes use of some of the analytical methods they’ve learned in the course.

Section 002 - Writers in Paris
R 330-600 (Bryan 312)
Instructor: Sydney Blair

We will read – with an eye on craft -- selections of the fiction (and in some cases non-fiction) of Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Stein and others, in order to gain not only a greater understanding of their individual artistic sensibilities but also to distinguish -- if indeed it exists -- any defining characteristics of their work as they relate to the particular experience of living and writing in France between the World Wars. Requirements: weekly response papers, classroom presentation, final paper. Active classroom participation is a must. RESTRICTED TO FOURTH YEARS.

Section 003 - Plants and Empire
TR 200-315 (Bryan 332)
Instructor: Mary Kuhn & Vivian Thomson

This course examines how botanical projects and their cultural representations shaped the material and political landscapes of empire. Combining literary analysis with environmental history and the history of science, we'll explore the intertwined social and ecological impacts of imperialism. A wide range of sources, from poems and novels to seed catalogues, herbariums, and UVa’s botanical gardens, will help us to see how the workings of empire in the 18th and 19th centuries shaped today's ideas about the environment.

ENSP 5559 - New Course in Special Topics in Literature

Section 001 - Life Writing and Digital Humanities
TR 1230-145 (Bryan 310)
Instructor: Alison Booth

This course will combine theory and practice: the theories and practices of how to write a life (one’s own or someone else’s); and the theories and practices of online life writing and digital humanities (or humanities scholarship that uses intensive computation).  We will read examples of autobiography and biography and write short “lives” that can be read on paper.  But we will also consider the many media in which narratives about human lives can be expressed, and experiment in using some of them. Students will design a longer project of their own creative or research interest.  Assignments in addition to this project include moderate reading of life narratives since 1800 and critical essays since about 1980 as well as exploration of online texts and projects; collaboration and participation in scheduled sessions for work on digital editing of some biographical or autobiographical materials and an assignment to contribute to the narrative editing project of Collective Biographies of Women; several writing assignments; and one short and one longer essay (which may be creative nonfiction).

ENSP 5810 - Film Aesthetics

Section 001
TR 1100-1215 (Bryan 310)
Instructor: Walter Korte

Restricted to Fourth Years and Graduate Students.  Instructor Permission Required.

ENSP 5810 is a course in film theory, criticism and visual thinking, in which we consider such issues as the nature of film language, the relationship between film and other arts, the psychology of spectatorship. We undertake a formal analysis of selected works by such filmmakers as Hitchcock, Coppola, Antonioni and Cronenberg. We will focus this semester on the work of David Lynch, with special emphasis on the surrealist and expressionist aspects of his cinema, and how the films relate to his work in painting, still photography, music, and theatre.

Course requirements include discussion participation, a final exam and a final critical paper.

ENSP 5820 - The Culture of London Past and Present

Location and Time TBA
Instructors: Clare Kinney, Michael Levenson
Restricted to Instructor Permission

Contact crk4h@virginia.edu or michael.levenson@virginia.edu.  The Culture of London: Past and Present" offers an interdisciplinary approach to metropolitan culture, as an historically embedded object of inquiry.  Located in London, it runs for a month each year from early June to early July.  Faculty members from the University direct, teach and lead the class; they are complemented by London-based specialists in architecture, art history, religious studies and contemporary politics.

Related Courses in Other Departments

CPLT 2010 - History of European Literature I (4 Credits)

Lecture:
TR 330-445 (Claud Moore Nursing Education Building - G010)
Instructor: Walter Jost
Cross-listed with ENGL 2010

Discussion Sections:

Section 101
F 1000-1050 (Astronomy Building 265)
Instructor: Christian Howard

Section 102
R 500-550 (New Cabell 415)
Instructor: Christian Howard

Section 103
R 600-650 (Wilson 244)

Section 104
F 1100-1150 (New Cabell 066)

CPLT 4998 - Fourth Year Thesis

Location and Time TBA
Instructor: Paul Cantor